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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Relationship between parenting practices and children's screen time during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Aslihan Ozturk Eyimaya; Aylin Yalçin Irmak

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Nursing

This study investigates the relationship between parenting practices and children's screen time following the COVID-19 outbreak. The population of the present cross-sectional study was the parents of children studying in three randomly-selected schools in the western, eastern and central regions of Turkey. The study data were collected between May 15 and 31, 2020, using a descriptive questionnaire form and the Parenting Practices Scale applied to 1115 parents of children between 6 and 13 years of age. The data were analyzed using the SPSS 21.0 software package, and with descriptive, correlation and multiple regression analyses.

The great disconnect: how remote learning in Iraq is leaving the most vulnerable further behind editorial
Institution: Norwegian Refugee Council
Published: October 2020
Seven months after schools shut down due to Covid-19, re-opening dates in Iraq remain unclear and classes limited to certain grades. Millions of children are expected to start the new academic year exclusively through distance-learning programs, at least for the upcoming semester and with a few exceptions1 . Just as last year, many displacement-affected children and their families may find themselves struggling with self-learning and unable to access online platforms while also having to cope with the practical burden and psychosocial toll of homeschooling within the precarious context of displacement in and out of camps. An assessment conducted by Mercy Hands over the Spring found that 83% of the 6,305 children surveyed in camps for internally displaced Iraqis did not receive any type of schooling in April.
Holidays over: a review of actual COVID-19 school outbreaks up to September 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Victor Grech; Elizabeth Grech; Jeremy Borg Myatt

Published: October 2020   Journal: Early human development
In the absence of an effective vaccine and/or treatment, COVID-19 remains pandemic. It is only public health measures, such as social distancing (and these included school closures), that have prevented millions of infections and deaths. School closures followed a precautionary principle in that many previous epidemics (e.g. influenza) were mainly transmitted by children. This is supported by few studies and yet, these closures have significantly impacted parents and children. We are now in September 2020, with public health restrictions being lifted in an attempt to attenuate the negative economic impact of the pandemic. The easing of restrictions has led to a resurgence of COVID-19 in a second wave of infections. In the meantime, summer school holidays are coming to an end in the northern hemisphere and it is salutary to review the effects on viral surges due to school openings thus far. This review shows that as schools open, outbreaks that affect both pupils and staff occur probably due to failure to adhere to public health principles: hand washing, distancing etc.
COVID-19 and children: UNICEF data hub
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: October 2020

Children are not the face of this pandemic. But they risk being among its biggest victims, as children’s lives are nonetheless being changed in profound ways. All children, of all ages, and in all countries, are being affected, in particular by the socio-economic impacts and, in some cases, by mitigation measures that may inadvertently do more harm than good. Moreover, the harmful effects of this pandemic will not be distributed equally. They are expected to be most damaging for children in the poorest countries, and in the poorest neighbourhoods, and for those in already disadvantaged or vulnerable situations. The potential losses that may accrue in learning for today’s young generation, and for the development of their human capital, are hard to fathom. 188 countries imposed countrywide school closures during the pandemic, affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Even prior to the pandemic, however, children’s learning was in crisis, and the pandemic has only sharpened these inequities, hitting schoolchildren in poorer countries particularly hard. Globally, many schools lack the resources to invest in digital learning, and many children from poorer households do not have internet access.

The right to education and ICT during COVID-19: an international perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Luis Miguel Lázaro Lorente; Ana Ancheta Arrabal; Cristina Pulido-Montes

Published: October 2020   Journal: Sustainability
There is a lack of concluding evidence among epidemiologists and public health specialists about how school closures reduce the spread of COVID-19. Herein, we attend to the generalization of this action throughout the world, specifically in its quest to reduce mortality and avoid infections. Considering the impact on the right to education from a global perspective, this article discusses how COVID-19 has exacerbated inequalities and pre-existing problems in education systems around the world. Therefore, the institutional responses to guaranteeing remote continuity of the teaching–learning process during this educational crisis was compared regionally through international databases.
Sustainability analysis of the e-learning education system during pandemic period—COVID-19 in Romania

AUTHOR(S)
Constantin Aurelian Ionescu; Liliana Paschia; Nicoleta Luminita Gudanescu Nicolau (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Sustainability
The unprecedented situation of the COVID-19 pandemic has generated radical transformations of the Romanian education system, forcing teachers as well as students to adapt in a short time to new social conditions and to the online learning process. The paper analyzes the sustainability of the e-learning system implemented in Romania during the pandemic, and it is based on an opinion poll based on a questionnaire developed on three levels of schooling (middle school, high school, and university), analyzed from three perspectives, teachers–students–parents, and identifying the possible psychological effects on students, resulting from the corroboration of social isolation with the online continuation of the educational process. Although before the pandemic the e-learning system was rarely used by both students and teachers, the research results indicate that students have accepted online learning, even if they find it less attractive than the traditional education system.
Does the pandemic help us make education more equitable?

AUTHOR(S)
Pasi Sahlberg

Published: October 2020   Journal: Educational Research for Policy and Practice
Everybody agrees that the COVID-19 pandemic is a big disruption in education. It questions many traditional rules and structures that have organised the work of schools in the past. But not everyone agrees that the pandemic will eventually change schools. This article tries to determine whether the pandemic will help us fix some of the preexisting inequalities that we were unable, and often unwilling, to improve. It also argues that as we think about how education should be reimagined, it is paramount to continue efforts to make education more inclusive, fairer and equitable for all. Two examples from two distinct education systems, Australia and Finland, are used to highlight how disrupted teaching caused by school closures has had different impacts on schools and teachers.
Aggregate and intergenerational implications of school closures: a quantitative assessment

AUTHOR(S)
Youngsoo Jang; Minchul Yum

Published: October 2020
A majority of governments around the world unprecedentedly closed schools in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper quantitatively investigates the macroeconomic and distributional consequences of school closures through intergenerational channels in the medium and long-term. The model economy is a dynastic overlapping generations general equilibrium model in which schools, in the form of public education investments, complement parental investments in producing children ís human capital.
Coping with more than COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kelley Swain

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Education, and its precarity for young women around the world, is a major theme in the UNICEF video essay series, “Coping with COVID-19”, which invited 16 adolescent girls from nine countries to film their lives under lockdown—“unfiltered, unscripted, 100% real”. These young women face complex interconnected challenges. Having access to safe, reliable, high-quality education can help them make choices that will benefit their goals relating to future work, relationships, and community involvement.
COVID-19 water, sanitation and hygiene in schools: a safe return to schools for refugee children and youth
Institution: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
Published: October 2020
This document presents the results of a survey assessing the WASH readiness of schools in UN-HCR-supported refugee camps and refugee settlements. UNHCR and partners are using the results to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) COVID-19 mitigation measures in schools and design targeted improvements to WASH facilities to allow for safe operation of schools.
Resultados del diagnóstico rápido de necesidades frentre a la pandemia COVID-19 Nicaragua
Institution: Save the Children
Published: October 2020
In May, Save the Children conducted a survey with 87 beneficiaries of projects that have been implemented in partnership with CESESMA, FUNARTE, Los Pipitos, MILAVF, and the City Hall of Cua. The survey was aimed at parents of children and adolescents to gain better knowledge of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results set the foundation for this document and will support the definition and adaptation of current and future Save the Children interventions.
The importance of investing in the wellbeing of children to avert the learning crisis
Institution: UNESCO, World Food Programme, *UNICEF, World Health Organisation
Published: October 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has created the largest disruption of education systems in history, affecting nearly 1.6 billion school-age children in more than 190 countries. Already last year, 250 million school-age children being out of school, the world was facing a “learning crisis”. But now with the COVID-19 pandemic, this crisis could turn into a generational catastrophe. While many children will continue with their education once schools reopen, others may never return to school. Current estimates indicate that 24 million children will never return to the classroom and among those, disproportional number of girls. To avert this crisis, we need to reimagine how we deliver good quality and inclusive education to the world children. Among other things, this calls for urgent investments in school health and nutrition programmes and create the conditions for children to lead healthy lives. This also includes health and nutrition literacy offered through the curriculum and through counselling in the school health services which provides young people with knowledge, skills, values, culture and behaviours they need to lead healthy, empowered lives.

Beijing+25: generation equality begins with adolescent girls' education
Institution: UNESCO
Published: October 2020

Adolescent girls' education contributes to a virtuous cycle that has proven positive impact on sustainable development. This report aims to examine progress and persistent gaps in our efforts to achieve gender equality in and through education since the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action in 1995, and to identify priority actions to be implemented within the Beijing+25 process, the Generation Equality Forum's Action Coalitions, and the Sustainable Development Goals. It shows the importance of adolescent girls' education and provides recommendations for collective action – in particular on three priority levers: Comprehensive sexuality education; the participation of adolescent girls in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); and the development of adolescent girls' leadership – drawing in particular on consultation processes among international organizations, civil society and adolescent girls in the run-up to the Forum. In all areas, specific levers, intersectoral approaches and multi-stakeholder partnerships are promoted.

Embracing a culture of lifelong learning: contribution to the futures of education initiative
Institution: UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning
Published: October 2020

This report presents a future-focused vision of education, which demands a major shift towards a culture of lifelong learning by 2050. It argues that the challenges humanity faces, those resulting from the climate crisis and from technological and demographic change, not to mention those posed by the COVID-19 pandemic and the inequalities it has exacerbated, call for societies that understand themselves as learning societies and people who identify themselves as learners throughout their lives.

UNESCO Creative Cities' response to COVID-19
Institution: UNESCO
Published: October 2020

The UNESCO Creative Cities Network (UCCN) joins together cities from across the world around the common objective of harnessing the potential of culture and creativity for a sustainable future. The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting people everywhere, and the culture sector has in many ways come to a standstill – cultural events, cinema, theatre and music performances have been cancelled, international tourism has largely ceased, restaurants and markets have closed, amongst others. This has not only impacted the sectors concerned, but also the public, which tends to turn to cultural products and services for education, entertainment, leisure, personal development, or social engagement. While this undoubtably has a serious impact on the economic viability of the cultural sector, the sector's fundamental creativity and ability to inspire social connection remains intact. The information submitted by over 90 Creative Cities from 44 UNESCO Member States shows how cities have come together to nurture new ideas and projects by connecting people to culture and creativity during the pandemic.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

The second digest discussed children and violence during the pandemic.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.