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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2506 - 2520 of 2543
Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
This article shows that support systems and safety nets that allow children to thrive have been stripped away during this pandemic. Family illness, and mental and financial stress have challenged the family unit. Social connections necessary for child development have been interrupted. Institutions that children depend on—schools, primary care, social services, and churches—are seriously disrupted. While there have been admirable efforts to cope, there is opportunity and urgency to develop and implement new connections, supports, and safety nets for children and families.
The impact of COVID-19 on children in Europe
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
This paper is divided into two parts. The first details the evidence from the ground, painting the picture of life for children during the pandemic in different European countries with statistics and examples, and giving a set of recommendations on measures that national governments across Europe can take to help protect children from the worst impacts of the crisis relating to the economic impacts on families, loss of services, access to education and targeted measures for children in migration. The second part focuses on recommendations to the EU institutions on how EU policy and funding can support and complement these national-level actions in these challenging times.
The neuropsychological impact of E-learning on children

AUTHOR(S)
Amrit Kumar Jha; lisha Arora

Published: July 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a massive upsurge in the demand for the e-learning platforms worldwide as children have been instructed to attend classes online from their homes to maintain continuity of formal learning. While neuroplasticity offers opportunity to adapt the sudden change in the modality of classroom transaction from face-to-face interaction to the technology-mediated learning, it may wreak havoc for the growing brain of children.
How is COVID-19 affecting the mental health of children with special educational needs and disabilities and their families?

AUTHOR(S)
Kathryn Asbury; Laura Fox; Emre Deniz (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Parents of children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in the UK (n = 241) were asked to describe the impact of COVID-19 on their own mental health and that of their child. An inductive content analysis of the data was undertaken. Both parents and children appear to be experiencing loss, worry and changes in mood and behaviour as a result of the rapid social changes that have occurred. Some parents reported feeling overwhelmed and described the impact of child understanding and awareness. Finally, a minority of parents reported that COVID-19 has had little impact on mental health in their family, or has even led to improvements. Implications for how to support these families in the immediate future are discussed.
Psychological burden of quarantine in children and adolescents: A rapid systematic review and proposed solutions

AUTHOR(S)
Nazish Imran; Irum Aamer; Muhammad Imran Sharif (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences
As COVID-19 grips the world, many people are quarantined or isolated resulting in adverse consequences for the mental health of youth. This rapid review takes into account the impact of quarantine on mental health of children and adolescents, and proposes measures to improve psychological outcomes of isolation. Three electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science were searched. Two independent reviewers performed title and abstract screening followed by full-text screening. This review article included 10 studies. The seven studies before onset of COVID 19 about psychological impact of quarantine in children have reported isolation, social exclusion stigma and fear among the children. The most common diagnoses were acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder, grief, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Three studies during the COVID-19 pandemic reported restlessness, irritability, anxiety, clinginess and inattention with increased screen time in children during quarantine. These adverse consequences can be tackled through carefully formulated multilevel interventions.
Gender Inequality and the COVID-19 Crisis: A Human Development Perspective
Institution: UNDP
Published: July 2020   Journal: UNDP Report
Across several social, economic, and political dimensions, women and girls are disproportionately affected by the crisis simply because of their sex. The immediate effects of COVID-19 on gender inequality are already showing themselves in health and education, on the burden of unpaid care work and gender-based violence.
While the COVID-19 crisis affects everyone, women and girls face specific and often disproportionate economic, health, and social risks due to deeply entrenched inequalities, social norms, and unequal power relations. Understanding the gender-differentiated impacts of the COVID-19 crisis through sex-disaggregated data is fundamental to designing policy responses that reduce vulnerable conditions and strengthen women's agency, placing gender equality at their centre. This is not just about rectifying long-standing inequalities but also about building a more just and resilient world.
An investigation of mental health status of children and adolescents in China during the outbreak of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Li Duan; Xiaojun Shao; Yuan Wang (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
This study investigates the psychological effects on children and adolescents associated with the epidemic in China. Findings indicate that the COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant psychosocial impact on children and adolescents. The presence of clinical depressive symptoms, resident in urban regions, implementation of the precaution and control measures, being female, having a family member or friend infected with coronavirus were associated with increased levels of anxiety.
Smartphone addiction, Internet addiction, family members or friends infected with coronavirus, graduation affected by the epidemic, levels of separation anxiety, physical injury fear, and tendency to adopt an emotion-focused coping style were associated with increased levels of respondents’ depressive symptoms.
Targeted intervention measures could be formulated based on the significant influencing factors on anxiety and clinical depressive symptoms.


Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 275 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: adolescents, children, COVID-19, mental health, pandemic | Countries: China
Effect of the COVID‐19 pandemic on anxiety among children with cystic fibrosis and their mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Burcu Pınar Senkalfa; Tugba Sismanlar Eyuboglu; Ayse T. Aslan (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology

This study aimed to evaluate anxiety among children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their mothers related to the COVID‐19 pandemic. A total of 45 patients with CF and their mothers were enrolled in the study together with 90 age‐matched healthy children and their mothers as a control group. The State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was administered by teleconference with children aged 13 to 18 years old and their mothers. The STAI for children was administered with children aged 9 to 12 years. Results were compared with age‐matched healthy children and their mothers. The relationship between anxiety scores of children with CF and their mothers was evaluated by comparing with clinical data of children with CF. At the conclusion of the teleconference, mothers were asked whether their anxiety had changed as a result of the interview.

Multisystem resilience for children and youth in disaster: reflections in the context of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ann S. Masten; Frosso Motti-Stefanid

Published: June 2020   Journal: Adversity and Resilience Science
In the context of rising disasters worldwide and the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, this commentary considers the implications of findings in resilience science on children and youth for disaster preparation and response. The multisystem challenges posed by disasters are illustrated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The significance of disasters in the history of resilience science and the emergence of a unifying systems definition of resilience are discussed. Principles of a multisystem perspective on resilience and major findings on what matters for young people in disasters are delineated with reference to the pandemic.
The intensive use of the internet by children and adolescents in the context of COVID-19 and the risks for self-inflicted violence

AUTHOR(S)
Suely Ferreira Deslandes; Tiago Coutinho

Published: June 2020   Journal: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
This essay aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. It briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a “global fear” that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. The debate has been centered on “recreational” practices, called “challenges” with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.
Parental burnout and child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Annette K. Griffith

Published: June 2020   Journal: Journal of Family Violence
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has spread across the United States, resulting in significant changes in almost all aspects daily life. These changes place parents at increased risk for parental burnout. Parental burnout is a chronic condition resulting from high levels of parenting-related stress due to a mismatch between the demands of parenting and the resources available for parents to meet those demands. Research on parental burnout has suggested that parents who experience burnout are more likely to engage in child abuse and neglect, placing children at risk for detrimental short- and long-term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review the concept of parental burnout, discuss parental burnout in the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, and focus specifically on the effects of child maltreatment. Implications for practitioners will be discussed.
Psychosocial and behavioral impact of COVID-19 in autism spectrum disorder: an online parent survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marco Colizzi ; Elena Sironi; Federico Antonini (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Brain Sciences
The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak could result in higher levels of psychological distress, especially among people suffering from pre-existing mental health conditions. Young individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are particularly at risk due to their vulnerability to unpredictable and complex changes. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on ASD individuals, whether any pre-pandemic sociodemographic or clinical characteristics would predict a negative outcome, and to narratively characterize their needs. Parents and guardians of ASD individuals filled out an online survey consisting of 40 questions investigating socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of their children, impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on their wellbeing and needs to deal with the emergency.
Impact of COVID -19 on children: special focus on the psychosocial aspect

AUTHOR(S)
Ritwik Ghosh; Mahua Dubey; Subhankar Chatterjee (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Minerva Pediatrica
Although medical literature shows that children are minimally susceptible to 2019-Corona virus disease (COVID-19), they are hit the hardest by psychosocial impact of this pandemic. Being quarantined in homes and institutions may impose greater psychological burden than the physical sufferings caused by the virus. School closure, lack of outdoor activity, aberrant dietary and sleeping habits are likely to disrupt children's usual lifestyle and can potentially promote monotony, distress, impatience, annoyance and varied neuropsychiatric manifestations. Incidences of domestic violence, child abuse, adulterated online contents are on the rise. Children of single parent and frontline workers suffer unique problems. The children from marginalized communities are particularly susceptible to the infection and may suffer from extended ill-consequences of this pandemic, such as child labor, child trafficking, child marriage, sexual exploitation and death etc.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 72 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 226-235 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection, Mental Health | Tags: child abuse and neglect, child mental health, COVID-19 response | Publisher: World Health Organisation
Handling children in COVID wards: a narrative experience and suggestions for providing psychological support

AUTHOR(S)
Swapnajeet Sahoo; Aseem Mehra; Vikas Suri (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Children cannot understand the need for isolation and hence, pose a clinical challenge in the COVID-19 ward. Some of these challenges are because of the environment of the COVID isolation wards, which are usually the makeshift wards or newly designed wards, which are isolated and far away from other ward areas, with restriction of movement.
Mental health burden for Chinese middle school students affected by the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Qiaohong Chen; Guohui Nie; Bin Yan (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
From January 2020 to May 2020, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused a huge impact on the Chinese people, especially young people in school.Starting from the end of February2020,many primary and middle school students were forced to take online courses at home due to long-term isolation.Because the college and high school entrance examination were particularly concerned in China, the pressure of preparing for the exams and the impact of the pandemic have brought a double psychological burden to the middle school students.
2506 - 2520 of 2543

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Check our quarterly thematic digests on children and COVID-19

Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.