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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 36
What will the long-lasting effect of the COVID-19 pandemic be on children's health and wellbeing?

AUTHOR(S)
Tobias Alfvén

Published: September 2020   Journal: Acta Paediatrica
This editorial is about the long lasting effects of the COVID-19 pandemic  on children's health and well-being.
Rapid return of children in residential care to family as a result of COVID-19: scope, challenges, and recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Philip Goldman

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, some governments have mandated that residential care providers rapidly return children and youth to family. The goal of the present study was to better understand the scope and characteristics of rapid return, and to provide data-informed recommendations for service providers working with this population.

Is the COVID-19 regulation that prohibits parental visits to their children who are patients in hospital invalid in terms of the Constitution? What should hospitals do?

AUTHOR(S)
D. J. McQuoid-Mason

Published: September 2020   Journal: South African Medical Journal
This article deals with whether the COVID-19 regulation that prohibits parental visits to their children who are patients in hospital is
invalid in terms of the Constitution of South Africa. The article contends that the ban on visits by parents to their children in hospital is
a violation of the children’s rights provisions of the Constitution regarding the ‘best interests of the child’, and the ‘best interests standard’
in the Children’s Act 38 of 2005. The article also points out that the regulations are not saved by the limitations clause of the Constitution,
because the restriction is not ‘reasonable and justifiable’ and a ‘less restrictive means’ can be used to achieve the same purpose of preventing
the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The article concludes that the relevant regulation is legally invalid, and hospitals would be fully justified
in allowing parental visits to child patients provided proper precautions are taken to contain the virus.
Youth experiences and future needs in learning and working during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Tammy Chang; Marika Waselewski; Melissa DeJonckheere (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Adolescents and young adults have experienced significant impact as a result of COVID-19 with many schools and work places transitioning to online formats, altering procedures or closing completely. Notably, many youths are in a unique position as both employees and students. Our team was interested in understanding what has been difficult for youth in making these changes, what has worked well, and what would help them learn or work better.
Parental perceptions of COVID-19 pandemic: adherence to laid down containment measures

AUTHOR(S)
Ezeonwu Bertilla; Joseph Ajanwaenyi; Uwadia Omozele (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: American Journal of Pediatrics
This article aims to ascertain, the perceptions of caregivers of children on covid-19 containment measures, the need for adherence to the measures to understand the reasons for poor compliance. The interviewees expressed their difficulties and frustrations in maintaining the rigors of application of these measures but would that government should expedite action towards the discovery of Protective vaccines because of the effect these measures had on their economic means of livelihoods.
Cite this research | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 357-361 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection, Social Protection, Well-being and Equity | Tags: community participation, poverty, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: Nigeria
Reimagining homelessness assistance for children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Duffield

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Children and Poverty

The homelessness response system in the United States is dominated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD’s definition of homelessness, program models, metrics, data, approaches, and goals have overshadowed those of other federal agencies. This policy brief argues that children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness have been poorly served by HUD’s dominance, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.The paper draws from research, policy analyses, and testimonies of parents, service providers, and educators to make the case for a reimagined homelessness response that is child-centered and oriented toward long-term goals of economic independence, health, and wellness.

The social safety net in the wake of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Marianne Bitler; Hilary W. Hoynes; Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

Published: September 2020
The COVID-19 crisis has led to spiking unemployment rates with disproportionate impacts on low-incomefamilies. School and child-care center closures have also meant lost free- and reduced-price schoolmeals. Food prices have increased sharply leading to reduced purchasing power for families’ limited income. Real time data show significant distress – notably food insecurity rates have increased almost three times overthe pre-COVID rates and food pantry use has also spiked. In this paper, we explore why there is so much unmet need despite a robust policy response.
Rapid return of children in residential care to family as a result of COVID-19: scope, challenges, and recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Philip Goldman

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

The goal of the study is to provide data-informed guidance and recommendations for public and private service providers working in nations in which children outside of parental care, especially those in residential care, have been rapidly returned to households due to COVID-19. This knowledge will allow for a better understanding of the situation of the rapid return of children due to COVID-19, its impact on children and families, and how service providers can best support them following this transition.

Screening for economic hardship for child welfare-involved families during the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid partnership response

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Fallon; Rachael Lefebvre; Delphine Collin-Vézina (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Given the range of negative consequences related to the pandemic and the evolving supports available to families, child protection workers needed a clinical tool to guide and support work with families informed by an understanding of economic hardship. The objective of this paper is to report on the development and implementation strategy of a tool to be used for practice intervention during the pandemic.
Child protection and resilience in the face of COVID-19 in South Africa: a rapid review of C-19 legislation

AUTHOR(S)
Ansie Fouché; Daniël F. Fouché; Linda C. Theron Simba

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
In response to the COVID-19 (C-19) pandemic, the South African government instituted strict lockdown and related legislation. Although this response was well intended, many believed it advanced children’s vulnerability to abuse and neglect. This article interrogates these concerns. It investigates how C-19 legislation enabled, or constrained, South African children’s protection from abuse and neglect and appraises the findings from a social-ecological resilience perspective with the aim of advancing child protection in times of emergency.
Child welfare and COVID-19: an unexpected opportunity for systemic change

AUTHOR(S)
Jane M. Spinak

Published: September 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has already wrecked greater havoc in poor neighborhoods of color, where pre-existing conditions exacerbate the disease’s spread. Crowded housing and homelessness, less access to health care and insurance, and underlying health conditions are all factors that worsen the chances of remaining healthy.Workers desperate for income continue to work without sufficient protective measures, moving in and out of these neighborhoods, putting themselves and their families at risk. During periods of greater disruption, tensions are heightened and violence more prevalent. Already some experts are warning of an onslaught of child maltreatment cases, citing earlier examples of spikes in foster care during drug epidemics and economic recessions. Instead of panicking, thinking creatively and thoughtfully about appropriate responses and using the information and resources we already have may help to diminish such fears and improve the safeguards that are needed to protect the integrity of families and keep children safe.

Women's and men's work, housework and childcare, before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Del Boca; Noemi Oggero; Paola Profeta (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
The current COVID-19 crisis further increased the workload of women, resulting from both their occupation and the housework. In contrast with men, there is no difference in the increase of housework between women who telecommute and those who do not work because of the emergency. This study shed light on a specific and crucial component of childcare: home schooling. The closure of schools has imposed a massive burden on parents, and especially on working parents. Results show that working women with young children, especially those aged 0–5, are those particularly affected, by bearing the excess burden to a higher extent. For women, the work–life balance is especially difficult to achieve when their partners keep working outside of the home during the emergency. These results may have long-term implications, and implications that are potentially negative for women, especially if both the labour market crisis and school closures persist. However, there are also some positive implications, if it means that couples are taking the opportunity of the crisis to share the burden of childcare more equally.
COVID-19 created a gender gap in perceived work productivity and job satisfaction: implications for dual-career parents working from home

AUTHOR(S)
Zhiyu Feng; Krishna Savani

Published: September 2020   Journal: Gender in management
This paper aims to examine gender gaps in work-related outcomes in the context of Covid-19. The authors hypothesized that the Covid-19 pandemic would create a gender gap in perceived work productivity and job satisfaction. This is because when couples are working from home the whole day and when schools are closed, women are expected to devote more time to housework and childcare.
Adolescents' health in times of COVID-19: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Wanderlei Abadio de Oliveira; Jorge Luiz da Silva ; André Luiz Monezi Andrade (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
This is a scoping literature review based on the following databases: Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, and PUBCOVID19. This scoping review addressed an emerging theme in relation to a population that has received little attention in studies on COVID-19. The results suggest that the pandemic can be considered a determinant that affects different dimensions of adolescents’ lives.
Child health, remote work and the female wage penalty

AUTHOR(S)
Amairisa Kouki; Robert M. Sauer

Published: August 2020
Using data on American women and the health status of their children, this paper studies the effect of remote work on female earnings. Instrumental variables estimates, which exploit a temporary child health shock as exogenous variation in the propensity to work at home, yield an hourly wage penalty of 77.1 percent. Earnings losses together with positive selection, and alternative first stage regressions, suggest that task re-assignment or lack of social interaction are likely mechanisms. The estimates also have implications for the costs of social distancing during a pandemic and may be especially applicable when children must be temporarily quarantined.
Cite this research | Issue: IZA DP No. 13648 | No. of pages: 24 | Language: English | Topics: Social Protection, Well-being and Equity, Health | Tags: child health, women's employment, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: United States
1 - 15 of 36

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.