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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 33
Food insecurity in households with young children: a test of contextual congruence

AUTHOR(S)
Justin T. Denney; Mackenzie Brewer; Rachel Tolbert Kimbro

Published: October 2020   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
Household food insecurity, an inability to provide adequate nutrition for a healthy, active lifestyle, affects nearly 1 in 7 households with children in the United States. Though rates of food insecurity declined to pre-recession levels just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, they are now once again increasing. As a result, in one of the wealthiest countries in the world, millions of young children continue to grow up in households that struggle daily with a problem that is often associated with the developing world. The result is both immediate and long- term health and development deficits for children.
Examining the impact of COVID-19 in ethnically diverse families with young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
C. Neece; L. L. McIntyre; R. Fenning

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
The present study sought to examine the impact of COVID-19 in 77 ethnically, linguistically and socioeconomically diverse families with young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) in California and Oregon, who were participating in larger intervention studies.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 64 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 739-749 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: disadvantaged groups, ethnic minority children, social inequality, COVID-19, impact | Countries: United States
COVID-19 and school return: The need and necessity

AUTHOR(S)
Cecily L. Betz

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
This paper discusses children and youth safely returning to schools in the midst of this Pandemic and the roles and responsibilities of pediatric nurses in supporting their school return. As evidence accumulates to inform treatment and public health preventive practices, questions arise as to the current and long-term psychosocial concerns and risk factors affecting the health and wellbeing of children that are the indirect yet problematic effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Child health experts, educators and families themselves, are calling attention to the actual and potential consequences of the necessary preventive practices of social distancing and stay at home directives. 
Child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: consequences of parental job loss on psychological and physical abuse towards children

AUTHOR(S)
Monica Lawson; Megan H. Piel; Michaela Simon

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The current study investigated factors associated with child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, including parental job loss, and whether cognitive reframing moderated associations between job loss and child maltreatment.
Reporting of child maltreatment during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in New York City from March to May 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Eli Rapoport; Hailey Reisert; Emily Schoeman (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
This study aims to assess associations between the pandemic public health response and the number of allegations of child abuse or neglect. It analyzed monthly data from New York City of the number of child maltreatment allegations, stratified by reporter type (e.g., mandated reporter, education personnel, healthcare personnel), as well as the number of Child Protective Services(CPS)investigations warranting child welfare preventative services.
Social distancing for COVID-19 and diagnoses of other infectious diseases in children

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan Hatoun; Emily Trudell Correa; Sara Mary Alice Donahue (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatrics
Social distancing (SD) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has largely removed children from school, day care, and other contact with peers. In addition to reducing transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, these changes would be expected to reduce the transmission of other infectious diseases among children. This study aims to determine the effect of SD on 12 infectious diseases commonly diagnosed in pediatric primary care that are contagious to various extents.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 146 | Issue: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, infectious disease | Countries: United States
The COVID-19 impact on childcare in agricultural populations

AUTHOR(S)
Marsha Salzwedel; Amy Liebman; Kate Kruse (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Agromedicine
The corona virus pandemic pulled back the curtain on rural America’s already fragile childcare system and shed light on the critical role that quality, affordable, accessible childcare plays in the lives of workers and families, as well as in the success of agricultural businesses. This commentary aims to describe how existing childcare problems were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, potentially impacting both the health and economics of farm households and farmworker families. For solutions to be successful, efforts will need to be collaborative, with federal interventions spurred on by childcare stakeholders. Successful collaborations will result in a better childcare system that nurtures children while their parents contribute to our nation’s production of agricultural products.
Should we mandate a COVID-19 vaccine for children?

AUTHOR(S)
Douglas J. Opel; Douglas S. Diekema; Lainie Friedman Ross (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics

The zeal to develop and implement a vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection has been exceptional. Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration's proposal, seeks to produce hundreds of millions of doses of a vaccine by January 2021. Recent polls show as many as 70% of adults in the United States plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. And thousands of adults have registered to participate as volunteers in human challenge trills to speed up the development of a new vaccine. We anticipate that this fervor will eventually lead to discussions about making a COVID-19 vaccine mandatory. An obvious group to target for mandatory vaccination is children. Not only do we already mandate several vaccines for them to attend school, but strategies to reopen schools or keep them open may be predicated on it.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: health care, vaccination policies, COVID-19 response | Countries: United States
Vulnerability and resilience to pandemic-related stress among U.S. women pregnant at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Heidi Preis; Brittain Mahaffey; Cassandra Heiselman (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
Women pregnant during the  COVID-19 pandemic are  experiencing moderate to  high levels of emotional distress, which has  previously been shown to  be  attributable to  two  types of  pandemic-related pregnancy stress: stress associated with feeling unprepared for  birth due  to  the  pandemic (Preparedness Stress) and stress related to fears of perinatal COVID-19 infection (Perinatal Infection Stress). Objective. Given the well-documented harms associated with elevated prenatal stress and  the  critical importance of  developing appropriately targeted interventions, we investigated factors predictive of pandemic-related pregnancy stress.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 266 | No. of pages: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: pregnant women, psychological distress, resiliency, women's health | Countries: United States
Sleep and screen time among adolescents during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kelly Janssens

Published: September 2020
The purpose of this study was to understand how both sleeping habits and smartphone use changed among adolescents between January 2020 to July 2020.
Youth experiences and future needs in learning and working during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Tammy Chang; Marika Waselewski; Melissa DeJonckheere (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Adolescents and young adults have experienced significant impact as a result of COVID-19 with many schools and work places transitioning to online formats, altering procedures or closing completely. Notably, many youths are in a unique position as both employees and students. Our team was interested in understanding what has been difficult for youth in making these changes, what has worked well, and what would help them learn or work better.
Advancing health equity by translating lessons learned from NICU family visitations during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Emily M. Pang; Rachelle Sey; Theodore De Beritto

Published: September 2020   Journal: NeoReviews
Since its emergence in December 2019, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), also referred to as the novel coronavirus 2019 or COVID-19, has created a global pandemic. To date, there are over 15 million confirmed cases worldwide and over 4 million confirmed cases in the United States. (1) Although many questions remain unanswered regarding children affected by the virus, the pandemic has highlighted inequities in the US health care system and has demonstrated the potential of advocacy to influence policy changes. Although the pandemic remains a tremendous challenge, we present a perspective on how lessons we have learned during this pandemic may translate to further advocacy for equity in neonatal care.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 22 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 11 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health care, health policy, social inequality | Countries: United States
Reimagining homelessness assistance for children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Duffield

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Children and Poverty

The homelessness response system in the United States is dominated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD’s definition of homelessness, program models, metrics, data, approaches, and goals have overshadowed those of other federal agencies. This policy brief argues that children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness have been poorly served by HUD’s dominance, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.The paper draws from research, policy analyses, and testimonies of parents, service providers, and educators to make the case for a reimagined homelessness response that is child-centered and oriented toward long-term goals of economic independence, health, and wellness.

COVID-19 and children with diabetes-updates, unknowns, and next steps: first, do no extrapolation

AUTHOR(S)
Linda A. Di Meglio; Anastasia Albanese-O’Neill; Cynthia E. Muñoz (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Diabetes Care
This study is about how COVID-19 is affecting children with both new-onset and established diabete.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health | Countries: United States
The social safety net in the wake of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Marianne Bitler; Hilary W. Hoynes; Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

Published: September 2020
The COVID-19 crisis has led to spiking unemployment rates with disproportionate impacts on low-incomefamilies. School and child-care center closures have also meant lost free- and reduced-price schoolmeals. Food prices have increased sharply leading to reduced purchasing power for families’ limited income. Real time data show significant distress – notably food insecurity rates have increased almost three times overthe pre-COVID rates and food pantry use has also spiked. In this paper, we explore why there is so much unmet need despite a robust policy response.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.