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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 89
A predictable home environment may protect child mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Laura M. Glynn; Elysia Poggi Davis; Joan L. Luby (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Neurobiology of Stress

Information about the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescent and adult mental health is growing, yet the impacts on preschool children are only emerging. Importantly, environmental factors that augment or protect from the multidimensional and stressful influences of the pandemic on emotional development of young children are poorly understood. Depressive symptoms in 169 preschool children (mean age 4.1 years) were assessed with the Preschool Feelings Checklist during a state-wide stay-at-home order in Southern California. Mothers (46% Latinx) also reported on externalizing behaviors with the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire. To assess the role of environmental factors in child mental health we examined household income, food insecurity, parental essential worker status and loss of parental job, as well as preservation of the structure of children's daily experiences with the Family Routines Inventory.

The psychiatric sequelae of the COVID‐19 pandemic in adolescents, adults, and health care workers
Published: December 2020   Journal: Depression and Anxiety
The COVID‐19 pandemic is the most serious global public health crisis since the 1918 influenza pandemic. This study is the first to assess its mental health impact across the lifespan in the United States in adolescents, adults, and health care workers.
Racial and ethnic differences in parental attitudes and concerns about school reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic — United States, July 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Leah K. Gilbert; Tara W. Strine; Leigh E. Szucs (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Families and school districts face challenges balancing COVID-19 mitigation and school reopening. Among parents of school-aged children who participated in an Internet panel survey, racial and ethnic minority parents were more concerned about some aspects of school reopening, such as compliance with mitigation measures, safety, and their child contracting or bringing home COVID-19, than were non-Hispanic White parents. Understanding racial/ethnic differences in parental attitudes and concerns about school reopening can inform communication and mitigation strategies and highlights the importance of considering risks for severe COVID-19 and family resource needs when developing options for school attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Aligning dissemination and implementation science with health policies to improve children’s mental health

AUTHOR(S)
K. E. Hoagwood; J. Spandorfer; R. Peth-Pierce (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: American Psychologist
The prevalence of mental health problems among children (ages 0–21) in the United States remains unacceptably high and, post-COVID-19, is expected to increase dramatically. Decades of psychological knowledge about effective treatments should inform the delivery of better services. Dissemination and implementation (D&I) science has been heralded as a solution to the persistent problem of poor quality services and has, to some extent, improved our understanding of the contexts of delivery systems that implement effective practices. However, there are few studies demonstrating clear, population-level impacts of psychological interventions on children. Momentum is growing among communities, cities, states, and some federal agencies to build “health in all policies” to address broad familial, social, and economic factors known to affect children’s healthy development and mental health.
COVID-19 and parent intention to vaccinate their children against influenza

AUTHOR(S)
Rebeccah L. Sokol; Anna H. Grummon

Published: December 2020   Journal: Pediatrics
This article aims to evaluate if the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic influences parents’ intentions to have their children receive the 2020–2021 seasonal influenza vaccination. In May 2020, 2164 US parents and guardians of children ages 6 months to 5 years have been recruited to complete a brief online survey that examined parental behavior and decision making in response to experimental stimuli and real-world events.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: parents, vaccination, infectious disease, COVID-19 response | Countries: United States
Inaccessible media during the COVID-19 crisis intersects with the language deprivation crisis for young deaf children in the US

AUTHOR(S)
Kaitlin Stack Whitney; Kristoffer Whitney

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Children and Media

The COVID-19 crisis has revealed and deepened existing language and media gaps for deaf children. There was already an ongoing crisis for deaf children in the US: language deprivation. Language deprivation is caused by a lack of access to natural language during the critical period for language development, generally age 0–5 years. The COVID-19 pandemic is now intersecting with and amplifying language gaps for deaf children in the US. For kids whose school has moved online, the majority living with non-signing families are spending more time isolated at home. In virtual schooling, deaf children are using tools not built for them.

Equity, engagement, and health: school organisational issues and priorities during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
José Eos Trinidad

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Educational Administration and History
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted and posed great challenges for kindergarten-grade12 education systems. Initial studies on education and COVID-19 often focus on technology use, student learning, and school reopening plans. However, debates on the form of instruction become futile when stakeholders are unclear about what the competing values, issues, and priorities are. Using exploratory data analysis of a representative sample of US teachers and school leaders, this paper highlights key organisational issues and priorities in terms of addressing academic achievement gaps, students’ online engagement, and teachers’ and students’ health. More fundamentally, deeper issues are uncovered like equity for those doubly disadvantaged by the pandemic, student engagement in the face of more pressing concerns, and health both physical and mental. More theoretically, the research contributes to understanding schools’ responses to societal crises and the need to clarify competing values during decision-making in the face of such crises.
Integrating public health ethics into shared decision-making for children during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Angira Patel; Dalia M. Feltman; Erin Talati Paquette

Published: December 2020   Journal: The Journal of Pediatrics
This commentary examines how values typically prioritized in public health ethics such as solidarity and justice can be integrated into SDM, where the individual child's best interest and caregiver preferences are often paramount. Additionally, it suggests a framework to integrate public health ethics into the traditional shared decision-making continuum using 4 scenarios that are examined for risks, benefits, settings, and appropriate levels of directiveness.
Feeding students during COVID-19—related school closures: a nationwide assessment of initial responses

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriella M. McLoughlin; Sheila Fleischhacker; Amelie A. Hecht (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

This study aims to conduct a nationwide assessment of child nutrition administrative agencies’ responses to meal service provision during coronavirus disease 2019–related school closures. Systematic coding of government websites (February–May 2020) regarding school meal provision in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia, 5 US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 52 | Issue: 12 | No. of pages: 1120-1130 | Language: English | Topics: Nutrition | Tags: child health, child nutrition, food policies, nutrition policy, school attendance, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: United States
Eating to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic and body weight change in young adults

AUTHOR(S)
Tyler B. Mason; Jessica Barrington-Trimis; Adam M. Leventhal

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Life disruptions caused by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic are particularly salient for young adults. Some young adults may engage in unhealthy eating practices to cope with social distancing and isolation during the pandemic, which could increase incidental weight gain. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of eating to cope with the pandemic with body weight change in young adults before versus after spread of COVID-19.
Considerations for educators in supporting student learning in the midst of COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Marlena L. Minkos; Nicholas W. Gelbar

Published: November 2020   Journal: Psychology in the Schools
COVID‐19 has presented a period of unprecedented challenge for schools in the United States. Thousands of school buildings across the country were closed in the spring of 2020 through the end of the school year to slow the spread of the global pandemic. Plans to reopen schools in many states remain uncertain as the virus continues to spread across communities. Current and future challenges are complex, with significant impacts on the global economy, health care system, and overall well‐being. When schools reopen, students will present with a wide variety of academic and social‐emotional needs, and schools will need to mindfully adjust systems and practices to meet the needs of their unique student population. This paper provides educators with suggestions on how to adapt existing multitiered systems of support using a trauma‐informed lens to support students during this unusual time.
Normalcy for children in foster care in the time of coronavirus

AUTHOR(S)
Mary Elizabeth Collins; Sarah Baldiga

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Children's Services
This paper aims to describe how a sense of normalcy for young people in foster care can be critical to their well-being. This paper reports on policy and practice efforts in the USA to promote normalcy for youth in care. The authors review policy that promotes normalcy and report on one organization's efforts to support these goals.
Cite this research | Vol.: 15 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 215-219 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection, Health | Tags: child welfare, foster care, foster children, COVID-19 response | Countries: United States
Essential services, risk, and child protection in the time of COVID-19: an opportunity to prioritize chronic need

AUTHOR(S)
Johanna Caldwell; Ashleigh Delaye; Tonino Esposito (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
In many North American jurisdictions, socioeconomically vulnerable families are more likely to be involved with child protection systems and experience ongoing challenges. The current public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic is having a disproportionate impact on these families via unemployment, “essential” work, isolation, and closures of childcare and schools, with negative implications for children’s developmental wellbeing. Experts warn that while child protection referrals have gone down, children who are at risk of maltreatment are less exposed to typical reporters (e.g., school professionals). At the same time, physical distancing measures are prompting many human service settings to shift toward virtual intervention with children and families. This commentary suggests that a focus on short-term risk in the response to COVID-19 may obscure support for children’s long-term outcomes.
Factors associated with caregiver preferences for children's return to school during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Christine A. Limbers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of School Health

Amid the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is a need to understand caregiver preferences for their children's instructional format for the start of the 2020 to 2021 academic year. The purpose of the current study was to assess caregiver preferences for on‐campus versus virtual learning at home during the fall and factors associated with these preferences. Participants were caregivers of 4436 children and adolescents who were enrolled in pre‐kindergarten through high school at a large, public school district in Texas. Caregivers were asked to complete an anonymous, online survey about their initial preferences for their student's back to the school learning environment.

SARS-CoV-2 transmission in an urban community: the role of children and household contacts

AUTHOR(S)
Chaya Pitman-Hunt; Jacqueline Leja; Zahra M. Jiwani

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
This is a single center US retrospective study of infection patterns among household sick contacts of children with confirmed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome – Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in an urban setting. A household sick contact (HHSC) was identified in fewer than half (42%) of patients and no child-to-adult transmission was identified.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.