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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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646 - 660 of 708
Using a rapid assessment methodology to identify and address immediate needs among low-income households with children during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Shreela V. Sharma; Amier Haidar; Jacqueline Noyola (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Plos One
Brighter Bites is a school-based health promotion program that delivers fresh produce and nutrition education to low-income children and families. Due to COVID-19-related school closures, states were under “shelter in place” orders, and Brighter Bites administered a rapid assessment survey to identify social needs among their families. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the methodology used to identify those with greatest social needs during this time (“high risk”), and to describe the response of Brighter Bites to these “high risk” families.
Social determinants of health–related needs during COVID-19 among low-income households with children

AUTHOR(S)
Shreela V. Sharma; Ru-Jye Chuang; Melinda Rushing (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Preventing Chronic Disease
Little is known about the social needs of low-income households with children during the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This rapid-response survey examines social needs, COVID-19–related concerns, and diet-related behaviors during the shelter-in-place phase of the US pandemic among low-income households with children enrolled in a nutrition program. Results show higher levels of financial instability; concerns about unemployment, food insecurity, and COVID-19; and reduced frequency of eating out and grocery shopping.
Leveraging implementation science in the public health response to COVID-19: child food insecurity and federal nutrition assistance programs
Published: October 2020   Journal: Public Health Reports

This commentary aims to examine the crucial role of dissemination and implementation (D&I) science—the study of methods to promote adoption and integration of evidence-based research in real-world policy or practice—to improve public health post–COVID-19. D&I science was created for this very situation, in which scientific knowledge is greatly needed but only if it holds practical relevance for the policy, environmental, and organizational systems that advance health. The paper discusses the application of D&I science to rapid evaluations of federal child nutrition assistance programs deployed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When adolescents are in school during COVID-19: coordination between school-based health centers and education is key

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Anderson; Simon Haeder; Kelli Caseman (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Schools and School-based Health Centers (SBHC) play complementary roles in adolescent’s lives. The intersection between health care, notably SBHCs, and education has never seemed as pronounced as during the COVID-19 pandemic. Amidst the rapidly changing landscapes for both education and healthcare lie ample opportunities for better alignment of strategies to ensure that, once children return to the classroom (whether in person or virtual), all have access to a comprehensive, culturally appropriate, affordable healthcare delivery systems. This study provides recommendations related to SBHCs that could benefit adolescent health during the return to school. 
The effect of the Coronavirus (Covid -19) pandemic on health-related quality of life in children

AUTHOR(S)
Derya Adıbelli; Adem Sümen

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The study was conducted to examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on health-related quality of life in children. The study was conducted with 597 children aged 7–13 and their parents using the online data collection tool via social media.
Parenting activities and the transition to home-based education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Shawna J. Lee; Kaitlin P. Ward; Olivia D. Chang (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
This study reports on parent-child dynamics following COVID-19 related school closures, based on cross-sectional analyses of a survey that utilized a convenience sampling approach. Data were collected approximately five weeks after the World Health Organization declared that the Coronavirus was a pandemic. Participants (N = 405) were adults recruited throughout the U.S. This study examines data from parents (69% mothers and 31% fathers) with at least one child 0-12 years of age.
Estimating the immediate impact of the COVID-19 shock on parental attachment to the labor market and the double bind of mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Misty L. Heggeness

Published: October 2020   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
This study examines the impact of the COVID-19 shock on parents’ labor supply during the initial stages of the pandemic. Using difference-in-difference estimation and monthly panel data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), I compare labor market attachment, non-work activity, hours worked, and earnings and wages of those in areas with early school closures and stay-in-place orders with those in areas with delayed or no pandemic closures. While there was no immediate impact on detachment or unemployment, mothers with jobs in early closure states were 68.8 percent more likely than mothers in late closure states to have a job but not be working as a result of early shutdowns. There was no effect on working fathers or working women without school age children. Mothers who continued working increased their work hours relative to comparable fathers; this effect, however, appears entirely driven by a reduction in fathers’ hours worked. Overall, the pandemic appears to have induced a unique immediate juggling act for working parents of school age children. Mothers took a week of leave from formal work; fathers working full time, for example, reduced their hours worked by 0.53 hours over the week. While experiences were different for mothers and fathers, each are vulnerable to scarring and stunted opportunities for career growth and advancement due to the pandemic.
Parenting stress and risk of child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: a family stress theory-informed perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Wu; Yanfeng Xu

Published: October 2020   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
The risk of child maltreatment is heightened during the pandemic due to multiple COVID-19 related stressors, such as physical and mental health concerns, economic stress, challenges in homeschooling, marital conflicts and intimate personal violence, and intensified child–parent relationships. Both parental internal (e.g., parenting styles) and external resources (e.g., social support), and parental perceptions toward stressors will affect how parents cope with these stressors, which may exacerbate or mitigate the risk of child maltreatment. Guided by family stress theory, this article identifies COVID-19 related stressors at the family level, and further elaborates on how these stressors are associated with child maltreatment via parents’ resources, perceptions, and coping strategies. Implications for future practice and research are discussed.
High levels of stress due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic among parents of children with and without chronic conditions across the USA

AUTHOR(S)
Miranda A. L. van Tilburg; Emily Edlynn; Marina Maddaloni (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children
The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unprecedented levels of stress for parents, especially those of children with chronic conditions. Mental health effects are expected to continue for months/years and preparation is needed to meet an increasing demand for mental health care.
COVID-19 trends among school-aged children — United States, March 1–September 19, 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca T. Leeb; Sandy Price; Sarah Sliwa (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Children aged <10 years can transmit SARS-CoV-2 in school settings, but less is known about COVID-19 incidence, characteristics, and health outcomes among school-aged children (aged 5–17 years) with COVID-19. Since March, 277,285 COVID-19 cases in children have been reported. COVID-19 incidence among adolescents aged 12–17 years was approximately twice that in children aged 5–11 years. Underlying conditions were more common among school-aged children with severe outcomes related to COVID-19. Weekly incidence, SARS-CoV-2 test volume, and percentage of tests positive among school-aged children varied over time and by region of the United States. It is important for schools and communities to monitor multiple indicators of COVID-19 among school-aged children and layer prevention strategies to reduce COVID-19 disease risk for students, teachers, school staff, and families. These results can provide a baseline for monitoring trends and evaluating mitigation strategies.

Cite this research | Vol.: 69 | No. of pages: 1410-1415 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, disease control, disease transmission, schools | Countries: United States
Well-being of parents and children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Stephen W. Patrick; Laura E. Henkhaus; Joseph S. Zickafoose (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Pediatrics

This national survey examines how the pandemic and mitigation efforts affected the physical and emotional well-being of parents and children in the United States. Since March 2020, 27% of parents reported worsening mental health for themselves, and 14% reported worsening behavioral health for their children. The proportion of families with moderate or severe food insecurity increased from 6% before March 2020 to 8% after, employer-sponsored insurance coverage of children decreased from 63% to 60%, and 24% of parents reported a loss of regular child care. Worsening mental health for parents occurred alongside worsening behavioral health for children in nearly 1 in 10 families, among whom 48% reported loss of regular child care, 16% reported change in insurance status, and 11% reported worsening food security. The study concludes that coronavirus disease pandemic has had a substantial tandem impact on parents and children in the United States. As policy makers consider additional measures to mitigate the health and economic effects of the pandemic, they should consider the unique needs of families with children.

 

Neonatal management and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: an observation cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Christine M. Salvatore; Jin-Young Han; Karen P. Acker (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The risk of vertical and perinatal transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19), the most appropriate management, and the neonate's risk of developing COVID-19 during the perinatal period are unknown. This observational cohort study, conducted on neonates born to mothers positive for SARS-CoV-2 at delivery, aims to identify best practices in infection control within mother–newborn dyads, as well as potential risk factors associated with transmission. 
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 721-727 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child and maternal health, COVID-19, infectious disease | Countries: United States
The role of palliative care in caring for the families of patients with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Bakar; Elizabeth Capano; Melissa Patterson (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
This study examines the role of palliative care for families of patients with Covid-19 in hospital settings. Multicomponenet interdisciplinary interventions have been implemented to enhance the ability to create a therapeutic alliance with family members and facilitate the provision of goal concordant care to patients with COVID-19. Findings show that families and patients benefit from targeted psycho-social support through the difficult process of making complex medical and end-of-life decisions during this unprecedented time.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 37 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 866-868 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, family assistance | Countries: United States | Publisher: World Health Organisation
Food insecurity in households with young children: a test of contextual congruence

AUTHOR(S)
Justin T. Denney; Mackenzie Brewer; Rachel Tolbert Kimbro

Published: October 2020   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
Household food insecurity, an inability to provide adequate nutrition for a healthy, active lifestyle, affects nearly 1 in 7 households with children in the United States. Though rates of food insecurity declined to pre-recession levels just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, they are now once again increasing. As a result, in one of the wealthiest countries in the world, millions of young children continue to grow up in households that struggle daily with a problem that is often associated with the developing world. The result is both immediate and long- term health and development deficits for children.
Examining the impact of COVID-19 in ethnically diverse families with young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
C. Neece; L. L. McIntyre; R. Fenning

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
The present study sought to examine the impact of COVID-19 in 77 ethnically, linguistically and socioeconomically diverse families with young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) in California and Oregon, who were participating in larger intervention studies. Results suggest that parents of young children with IDD report significant challenges at home during the pandemic. Professional support, especially during the reopening phases, will be critical to support family well‐being and child developmental outcomes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 64 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 739-749 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, disadvantaged groups, ethnic minority children, impact, social inequality | Countries: United States
646 - 660 of 708

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.