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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2251 - 2265 of 2803
An analysis of child-care and school outbreak data and evidence-based recommendations for opening schools & keeping them open

AUTHOR(S)
Fiona Russell; Kathryn Snow; Margie Danchin (et al.)

Published: September 2020
This report is an analysis of the global literature and available Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) and school outbreak data, 25 January 2020 – 31 August 2020. It aims to explore the role of ECEC and schools in transmission of SARS-CoV-2.
Supplement to framework for reopening schools: emerging lessons from country experiences in managing the process of reopening schools
Institution: UNESCO, *UNICEF, The World Bank
Published: September 2020
Education systems around the world continue to grapple with the complex decisions of when and how to reopen schools for in-person learning following widespread closures due to the COVID 19 pandemic.1 Many countries closed schools along with other widespread restrictions as an immediate response to the increased spread of COVD-19. But school closures have had increasingly clear negative impacts on child health, education and development, family income and the overall economy.
Fiscal responses to education and training in the context of COVID-19
Institution: UNESCO
Published: September 2020
This paper aims to assess to what extent education has been addressed in massive governments' fiscal responses being taken since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and to make a case for sustained investment in education and training.
Moving beyond the numbers: what the COVID-19 pandemic means for the safety of women and girls
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: September 2020

This article illustrates some of the limitations of the statistics that have been widely publicized in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, provides additional contextual information to better understand the risks women and girls are facing, and outlines some priority recommendations to Governments, policy makers, donors and key humanitarian and development actors for addressing gender-based violence in the context of COVID-19.

COVID-19 pandemic: the impact on vulnerable children and young people in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Benjamin Jones; Susan Woolfenden; Sandra Pengilly (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
This article aims to present the reasons for vulnerability of children and young people (CYP) during the pandemic, and to focus on actions by health professionals that mitigate additional challenges to their health and well-being. Using a rapid review of the literature and team-based discussions, eight vulnerable groups were identified: CYP with disabilities, mental health conditions and chronic diseases; CYP facing financial hardship; within the child protection system; Aboriginal; migrant and refugee; in residential care; rural; and isolated CYP. Recommendations for action are required at the level of governments, health professionals and researchers and include enhancing access to health and social supports, prioritising vulnerable CYP in resuming health activity and elevating the voice of CYP in designing the response.
This
article aims to present the reasons for vulnerability of CYP during the pandemic, and to focus on actions by health professionals that mitigate
additional challenges to their health and well-being. Using a rapid review of the literature and team-based discussions, eight vulnerable groups
were identied: CYP with disabilities, mental health conditions and chronic diseases; CYP facing nancial hardship; within the child protection sys-
tem; Aboriginal; migrant and refugee; in residential care; rural; and isolated CYP.
Adapting an emotional regulation and social communication skills group programme to teletherapy, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Deirdre MacEvilly; Geraldine Brosnan

Published: September 2020   Journal: Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine
The Covid-19 pandemic created an unprecedented situation whereby essential services within child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) were suspended. This created a need to modify regular methods of treatment at a rapid pace, to avoid cessation of clinical intervention and prevent potential regression in mental health. Eighteen children with moderate-severe mental health disorders and their parents were attending weekly group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) based sessions (‘The Secret Agent Society’ (SAS) programme) when the Irish Department of Health suspended face-to-face intervention. This report describes how the group sessions were adapted to individualized, online therapeutic triads between each child, his/her parent and their clinician. Whilst internet technology has emerged as a promising solution to shortfalls in therapy services, in-depth exploration is needed to confirm the efficacy of telehealth for children attending CAMHS.
Building resilient societies after COVID-19: the case for investing in maternal, neonatal, and child health

AUTHOR(S)
Chandni Maria Jacob; Despina D. Briana; Gian Carlo Di Renzo (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Lancet Public Health
This study indicates clearly that a focus on maternal, neonatal, and child health (MNCH) will promote later resilience. This knowledge offers an unprecedented opportunity to disrupt entrenched strategies and to reinvest in MNCH in the post-COVID-19 so-called new normal. Furthermore, analysis of the short-term, medium-term, and longer-term consequences of previous socioeconomic shocks provides important insights into those domains of MNCH, such as neurocognitive development and nutrition, for which investment will generate the greatest benefit. Such considerations apply to high-income countries (HICs) and low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, implementing appropriate policies in the post-COVID-19 recovery period will be challenging and requires political commitment and public engagement.
A spatiotemporal analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on child abuse and neglect in the city of Los Angeles, California

AUTHOR(S)
Gia E. Barboza; Lawrence B. Schiamberg; Layne Pachl

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
This study aims to provide unique insights into the spatial and temporal distribution of child abuse and neglect (CAN) in relation to COVID-19 outcomes and identify areas where CAN has increased or decreased during the pandemic.
Hidden scars: the impact of violence and the COVID-19 pandemic on children’s mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Najat Maalla M’jid

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
This article outlines how the risk of children experiencing violence has increased and how the pandemic has weakened the capacity of child protection and mental health services to respond. The article argues for child protection, mental health and other core services to be prioritized during and after the pandemic. Despite commitments made by the international community to end violence against children and support their mental health, there has been a serious lack of investment and capacity to provide quality, rights-based, culturally appropriate mental health care globally. The arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified these challenges. 
A national consensus management pathway for paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS): results of a national Delphi process

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Harwood; Benjamin Allin; Christine E. Jones (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS) is a novel condition that was first reported in April, 2020. This study aims to develop a national consensus management pathway for the UK to provide guidance for clinicians caring for children with PIMS-TS.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, infectious disease, medical care | Countries: United Kingdom
Tracking the situation of children during COVID-19
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: September 2020 UNICEF Publication
This dashboard is based on quarterly updates of recent data collection efforts from UNICEF country offices drawing on best available sources in each country, including administrative data or representative survey data collected in the last 3 months; or where necessary, extrapolations from reliable localized quantitative and/or qualitative reports. Estimates may not accurately represent the full national response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the challenges of traditional data collection efforts during the pandemic, this dashboard offers relevant early indication of impacts on the disruption of essential services.
The hidden impact of Covid-19
Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This global research series by Save the Children is the largest and most comprehensive study on the impact of COVID-19 on children. 13.5 thousand children and 31.5 thousand caregivers from 46 countries shared their experiences, fears, hopes and messages for leaders in this study. The extensive study includes the voices of the most marginalised children and general public - with our in-depth analysis focussing on a representative random sample of 25,000 Save the Children program participants across 37 countries globally. The global study reveals the hidden impacts of pandemic response measures which are impacting children’s health, nutrition, education, learning, protection, wellbeing, family finances and poverty. For the most marginalised and deprived children, those impacts have the potential to be life-altering and potentially devastating. The poorest households, households with disabilities, female headed-households and girls, are the hardest hit. The recommendations guided by views & voices of children provide guidance on the next steps needed to build back better for a post COVID-19 future which respects, protects and fulfils the rights of all children, in all contexts.
Guidance for Alternative Care Provision during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jess Edwards

Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This document provides practical guidance to actors in humanitarian and development contexts on the adaptations and considerations needed to support children who are either currently in alternative care or are going into an alternative care placement during the COVID-19 pandemic. It expands on the guidance provided in the Interagency Technical Note on Children and Alternative Care Immediate Response Measures by providing more detailed guidance for the medium and long-term response, recognising that the current pandemic and measures to address it are likely to continue over prolonged periods of time, and also to be reoccurring in phases. It should be read alongside the Technical Note: Adaptation of Child Protection Case Management to the COVID-19 Pandemic. International standards and guidelines on children’s rights and alternative car.
Protect a generation: the impact of COVID-19 on children's lives
Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This report shows that the most marginalised and deprived children have been hit the hardest, and existing inequalities have been exacerbated. Progress that had been made against the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for children is at risk of being disrupted, or even lost. For many children, the impacts of the pandemic will be catastrophic.
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Supplement to Framework for reopening schools: emerging lessons from country experiences in managing the process of reopening schools
Institution: UNESCO, *UNICEF, The World Bank, World Food Programme, UNHCHR
Published: September 2020
Education systems around the world continue to grapple with the complex decisions of when and how to reopen schools for in-person learning following widespread closures due to the COVID 19 pandemic. Experiences in most high-income countries show no measurable impact of school reopening on increasing community transmission rates, while within primary school settings in particular there has been limited transmission among children or between children and adults. Emerging evidence drawn from Eastern and Southern Africa also suggests that schools have not been associated with significant increases in community transmission. As more countries are re-opening schools, lessons are emerging on what is working. These lessons are shared in this supplement piece covering the same areas that were covered in the Framework for Re-opening Schools.
2251 - 2265 of 2803

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.