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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2761 - 2775 of 3702
Lessons from COVID-19 pandemic for the child survival agenda

AUTHOR(S)
S. V. Subramanian; Pritha Chatterjee; Omar Karlsson

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Global Health
The public discourse around the COVID-19 pandemic has been strikingly quantitative. Worldwide, the mainstream media has regularly informed the public of confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths, including projections of worst-case scenarios drawn from esoteric epidemiological models. The prominence and visibility of data, regardless of its completeness or quality, underscored the threat of COVID-19 to policy makers and lay individuals alike. It also prompted governments to swiftly lock down their societies, despite the socioeconomic disruptions and human suffering associated with such lockdowns. The widespread media coverage of COVID-19 data and swift response from governments highlight the potency of real-time data, and contain important lessons for public health policy, which when applied, could raise the profile of other health issues and spur action among key stakeholders.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 10 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 3 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: communication, COVID-19 response, data analysis, data collection, information
Gender-based violence during the COVID-19 pandemic response in Italy.

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca Lundin; Benedetta Armocida; Paola Sdao (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Global Health
Gender-based violence (GBV), with one out of three women worldwide experiencing violence in their lifetime, has been defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a “global public health problem of epidemic proportions”. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, the WHO and other international authorities have warned about the increased risk of GBV related to more time spent indoors, isolation from social and protective networks, and greater social and economic stress re-lated to both the epidemic and response measures. In fact, since the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak, reports from many countries including France, Ger-many, Spain, the United Kingdom, Cyprus, Argentina, Singapore, Canada, and the United States indicate that violence against women has increase.
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Children with disabilities: ensuring their inclusion in COVID-19 response strategies and evidence generation.
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: December 2020 UNICEF Publication
The COVID-19 crisis is disrupting life in every corner of the globe. But while its impacts are far-reaching, the virus and the measures implemented by governments to contain its spread are hitting the most vulnerable children and families the hardest. Even before the pandemic struck, children with disabilities were among the most disadvantaged, facing increased exposure to abuse and discrimination as well as reduced access to services in many parts of the world. This publication uses existing data to illustrate the vulnerabilities that place children with disabilities at higher risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. It documents what has happened to services for children and adults with disabilities across the world and includes examples of what has been done to address disruptions in services. It also discusses the challenges in generating disability-inclusive data during the pandemic.
Violence against Jordanian women during COVID‐19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Sawsan Abuhammad

Published: November 2020   Journal: The International Journal of Clinical Practice

Extraordinary steps have been taken to alleviate the current quick transmission of the Jordanian COVID‐19 pandemic. The obligatory lock‐down affects their obedience to measures to fight COVID‐19. This research aims to determine the prevalence rate of violence amongst women in Jordan and identify possible correlates of violence amongst women during the COVID‐19 outbreak.

Caregiver satisfaction and effectiveness of teleconsultation in children and adolescents with migraine during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Indar Kumar Sharawat; Prateek Kumar Panda

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Neurology
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown measures have forced clinicians across the world to look on telemedicine. Although migraine as such seems an ideal option for telemedicine, a systematic study reviewing feasibility, efficacy, and advantages of current advanced telecommunication technologies in children with migraine is lacking.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 296-303 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, health care, lockdown, social distance, teleworking | Countries: India
COVID-19 & immigration detention: what can governments and other stakeholders Do?
Institution: United Nations Network on Migration
Published: November 2020
The United Nations Network on Migration is committed to supporting all partners in pursuit of the implementation of the Global Compact for Migration, recognizing that this cooperative framework provides an invaluable tool for ensuring all in society can contribute to a collective response to COVID-19 and are protected equally against its impact. To that end this briefing is part of a series by the Network looking at different aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic and how they relate to migrants and their communities. The present document aims to provide practical guidance to States and other stakeholders in preventing and responding to COVID-19 in the context of immigration detention, highlighting instances of promising practices as useful models to draw from.
How to sustain and expand the use of alternatives to immigration detention in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Institution: United Nations Network on Migration
Published: November 2020
At a pivotal moment for immigration detention policies and practices, with many States making decisions that will determine whether or not the COVID-19 pandemic is a watershed moment in the use of detention for migration-related reasons, this online workshop brought together government peers from all regions to discuss how to build on the momentum created by the ongoing health crisis to sustain and expand the use of alternatives to immigration detention (ATDs).
COVID-19 protection needs identification and analysis in the State of Palestine

AUTHOR(S)
Zeudi Liew

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: November 2020
Prior to the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) outbreak in the State of Palestine, the country was already affected by a protracted humanitarian protection crisis due to the ongoing occupation of the West Bank and blockade of the Gaza Strip. The country level Child Protection Area of Responsibility (AoR) wished to explore the impact of COVID-19 on children’s health, education, well-being, safety and protection as well as on families’ socioeconomic situation.
No increase in psychosocial stress of Dutch children with cancer and their caregivers during the first months of the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Marloes van Gorp; Heleen Maurice‐Stam; Layla C. Teunissen (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
This study aimed to show the psychosocial impact of the start of the COVID‐19 pandemic on Dutch children with cancer in outpatient care and their caregivers (n = 799) using regular monitoring and screening outcomes. No differences were observed between the pre‐COVID‐19 and early‐COVID‐19 periods in health‐related quality of life and fatigue of children. Fewer caregivers were distressed during the COVID‐19 period than pre‐COVID‐19. In conclusion, the additional stress of COVID‐19 did not deteriorate psychosocial functioning of children with cancer and their caregivers.
Considerations for educators in supporting student learning in the midst of COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Marlena L. Minkos; Nicholas W. Gelbar

Published: November 2020   Journal: Psychology in the Schools
COVID‐19 has presented a period of unprecedented challenge for schools in the United States. Thousands of school buildings across the country were closed in the spring of 2020 through the end of the school year to slow the spread of the global pandemic. Plans to reopen schools in many states remain uncertain as the virus continues to spread across communities. Current and future challenges are complex, with significant impacts on the global economy, health care system, and overall well‐being. When schools reopen, students will present with a wide variety of academic and social‐emotional needs, and schools will need to mindfully adjust systems and practices to meet the needs of their unique student population. This paper provides educators with suggestions on how to adapt existing multitiered systems of support using a trauma‐informed lens to support students during this unusual time.
COVID‐19 and children with cancer: parents’ experiences, anxieties and support needs

AUTHOR(S)
Anne‐Sophie E. Darlington; Jessica E. Morgan; Richard Wagland (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Blood & Cancer

Children with cancer were designated as clinically extremely vulnerable if they were to contract SARS‐CoV‐2 due to immune suppression in the early phase of the COVID‐19 pandemic. Our aim was to explore experiences, information and support needs, and decision making of parents with a child with cancer in response to this phase in the United Kingdom. Parents of a child with cancer completed a survey at a time when the UK moved into a period of ‘lockdown’. An online survey was developed by the research team to capture parents’ experiences, information and support needs, and decision making, using closed statements and open text boxes. Descriptive quantitative analyses and qualitative thematic content analysis were undertaken.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 68 | Issue: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, diseases, lockdown, parents | Countries: United Kingdom
Bangladesh: Covid-19 knowledge, attitudes, practices & needs: responses from three rounds of data collection among adolescent girls in districts with high rates of child marriage

AUTHOR(S)
Amin Sajeda; Rob Ubaidur; Ainul Sigma (et al.)

Institution: Population Council, *UNICEF
Published: November 2020
From April 20–30, 2020, during a nationwide lockdown, the Population Council Bangladesh conducted the first round of a rapid phone-based survey on COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP). The survey randomly selected girls who had provided phone numbers during enrollment in a skills-building program that began before the pandemic. The survey’s objective was to assess the impact of COVID-19 on adolescent lives and to design programs that would contribute to protecting girls and meet social distancing guidelines imposed by the government. Phone interviews were conducted with 479 girls living in the districts of Chapainawabganj, Kushtia, and Sherpur who were participants in a program focused on reducing child marriage by increasing school attendance and grade progression among girls ages 12 to 15.1 A follow-up survey was conducted from June 12–22, 2020, prior to the introduction of virtual skills sessions as school closure and social distancing protocols were in effect. The nationwide lockdown had been withdrawn by that time. A third round of remote data collection took place from September 5–11, 2020. This brief presents the findings and comparisons from the three rounds of phone surveys.
COVID-19: a catastrophe for children in sub-Saharan Africa
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: November 2020

This report investigates how COVID-19 and other shocks have impacted child well-being in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) during 2020 and the potential role of cash transfers and external resources to help children and economies. It reviews the latest social, economic and financial information from a range of global databases and modelling exercises, draws on emerging country-level reporting and carries out projections where recent data are unavailable. Although information remains incomplete and things are quickly evolving, the outlook is alarming.



Epidemiology and transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in two Indian states

AUTHOR(S)
Ramanan Laxminarayan; Shankar Reddy Dudala Dudala; Brian Wahl (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Science
Although most cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have occurred in low-resource countries, little is known about the epidemiology of the disease in such contexts. Data from the Indian states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh provide a detailed view into severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission pathways and mortality in a high-incidence setting. Reported cases and deaths have been concentrated in younger cohorts than would be expected from observations in higher-income countries, even after accounting for demographic differences across settings. Among 575,071 individuals exposed to 84,965 confirmed cases, infection probabilities ranged from 4.7 to 10.7% for low-risk and high-risk contact types, respectively. Same-age contacts were associated with the greatest infection risk. Case fatality ratios spanned 0.05% at ages of 5 to 17 years to 16.6% at ages of 85 years or more. Primary data from low-resource countries are urgently needed to guide control measures.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 370 | Issue: 6517 | No. of pages: 691-697 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, data collection, disease control, disease transmission, epidemiology, low-income countries | Countries: India
Distinct antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in children and adults across the COVID-19 clinical spectrum

AUTHOR(S)
Stuart P. Weisberg; Thomas J. Connors; Yun Zhu (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Nature Immunology
Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are associated with age. Adults develop respiratory symptoms, which can progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the most severe form, while children are largely spared from respiratory illness but can develop a life-threatening multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Here, we show distinct antibody responses in children and adults after SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.