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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2806 - 2820 of 3263
Fertility intentions among couples in Shanghai under COVID‐19: a cross‐sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Chenfeng Zhu; Jiahao Wu; Yan Liang (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology
This study aims to evaluate fertility intentions among couples in Shanghai under the novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19) pandemic against the backdrop of persistently low fertility.
Cite this research | Open access | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: fertility, government policy | Countries: China
Contextualizing parental/familial influence on physical activity in adolescents before and during COVID-19 pandemic: a prospective analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Gilic; Ljerka Ostojic; Marin Corluka (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Children
Parental and familial factors influence numerous aspects of adolescents’ lives, including their physical activity level (PAL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in PAL which occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to evaluate influence of sociodemographic and parental/familial factors on PAL levels before and during pandemic in adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 24 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Bosnia And Herzegovina
Specifics of COVID-19 in pregnant women and their children-a review

AUTHOR(S)
Paweł Stanicki; Julita Szarpak; Małgorzata Wieteska

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Education, Health and Sport
The course of coronavirus disease in pregnant women is similar to that of other infected women. While most studies do exclude the presence of a vertical infection, there are reports of severe course of the disease and possible vertical infection. Patients with COVID-19 may be more prone to premature delivery, however, to confirm this thesis, it is necessary to examine a larger number of pregnant women.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 103-110 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, pregnant women, women's health
Pregnant women's health-related behavior changes and psychological status after the peak of COVID-19 outbreak in China: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Ruixue Tian; Xu Zhang; Xiaoli Chen (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Little is known about the relationship between health-related behavior and psychologicalstatus of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak. This paper aims to describe the health-related behavior changes and psychological status of Chinese pregnant women, and to explore the relationship between pregnant women’s characteristics, health-related behavior and different psychological status following the peak of COVID-19 outbreak.
The social safety net in the wake of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Marianne Bitler; Hilary W. Hoynes; Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

Published: September 2020
The COVID-19 crisis has led to spiking unemployment rates with disproportionate impacts on low-incomefamilies. School and child-care center closures have also meant lost free- and reduced-price schoolmeals. Food prices have increased sharply leading to reduced purchasing power for families’ limited income. Real time data show significant distress – notably food insecurity rates have increased almost three times overthe pre-COVID rates and food pantry use has also spiked. In this paper, we explore why there is so much unmet need despite a robust policy response.
Child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: consequences of parental job loss on psychological and physical abuse towards children

AUTHOR(S)
Monica Lawson; Megan H. Piel; Michaela Simon

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The current study investigated factors associated with child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, including parental job loss, and whether cognitive reframing moderated associations between job loss and child maltreatment.
Early effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity and sedentary behavior in children living in the US

AUTHOR(S)
Genevieve F. Dunton; Bridgette Do; Shirlene D. Wang

Published: September 2020   Journal: BMC Public Health
COVID-19 restrictions such as the closure of schools and parks, and the cancellation of youth sports and activity classes around the United States may prevent children from achieving recommended levels of physical activity (PA). This study examined the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on PA and sedentary behavior (SB) in U.S. children.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, child well-being, lockdown | Countries: United States
The mental health of children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: a narrative review

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Maria Duarte Wigg; Isabella Maria Félix de Almeida Coutinho; Isabelle Cristine da Silva

Published: September 2020   Journal: Research, Society and Development
The study was a narrative review on the mental health of children and adolescents during a COVID-19 pandemic. A search was performed in the PubMed, BVS and Google Scholar databases, between April and June 2020. The studies revealed greater psychological distress due to social isolation, increased family conflicts and violence between parents and children. The closure of schools, lack of social interaction, feelings of uncertainty and fear in the face of a pandemic also contribute to the emergence of anxiety and stress symptoms in families.
Brazilian child protection professionals' resilient behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sidnei Rinaldo Priolo Filho; Deborah Goldfarb; Murilo R. Zibetti

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Within the unique and understudied context of a developing economy facing the strain of an international pandemic, this study sought to expand our theoretical understanding of the individual and socio-ecological predictors of whether child protective services professionals engage in resilient behaviors. Child protection professionals' resilience must be fostered by socio-ecological contexts, such as their workplace and employers, and additional supports are needed during the trying times of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Rapid return of children in residential care to family as a result of COVID-19: scope, challenges, and recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Philip Goldman

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

The goal of the study is to provide data-informed guidance and recommendations for public and private service providers working in nations in which children outside of parental care, especially those in residential care, have been rapidly returned to households due to COVID-19. This knowledge will allow for a better understanding of the situation of the rapid return of children due to COVID-19, its impact on children and families, and how service providers can best support them following this transition.

Screening for economic hardship for child welfare-involved families during the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid partnership response

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Fallon; Rachael Lefebvre; Delphine Collin-Vézina (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Given the range of negative consequences related to the pandemic and the evolving supports available to families, child protection workers needed a clinical tool to guide and support work with families informed by an understanding of economic hardship. The objective of this paper is to report on the development and implementation strategy of a tool to be used for practice intervention during the pandemic.
Child protection and resilience in the face of COVID-19 in South Africa: a rapid review of C-19 legislation

AUTHOR(S)
Ansie Fouché; Daniël F. Fouché; Linda C. Theron Simba

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
In response to the COVID-19 (C-19) pandemic, the South African government instituted strict lockdown and related legislation. Although this response was well intended, many believed it advanced children’s vulnerability to abuse and neglect. This article interrogates these concerns. It investigates how C-19 legislation enabled, or constrained, South African children’s protection from abuse and neglect and appraises the findings from a social-ecological resilience perspective with the aim of advancing child protection in times of emergency.
COVID-19 and schools: guidelines of the French pediatric society

AUTHOR(S)
R. Cohen; C. Delacourt; C. Gras-Le Guen (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Archives de Pédiatrie
The educational and social benefits provided by school far outweigh the risks of a possible COVID-19 contamination of children in school environments or in daycare centers. Following summer break, the back-to-school period in France is taking place in the context of an increasing viral spread and requires strict adherence to health measures to limit the risk of outbreaks in communities. Based on a critical update of the role of children in the transmission of the infection, and of children's susceptibility to infection, the French Pediatric Society published practical guidelines for school re-entry and the management of COVID-19 infections in schools.
Child welfare and COVID-19: an unexpected opportunity for systemic change

AUTHOR(S)
Jane M. Spinak

Published: September 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has already wrecked greater havoc in poor neighborhoods of color, where pre-existing conditions exacerbate the disease’s spread. Crowded housing and homelessness, less access to health care and insurance, and underlying health conditions are all factors that worsen the chances of remaining healthy.Workers desperate for income continue to work without sufficient protective measures, moving in and out of these neighborhoods, putting themselves and their families at risk. During periods of greater disruption, tensions are heightened and violence more prevalent. Already some experts are warning of an onslaught of child maltreatment cases, citing earlier examples of spikes in foster care during drug epidemics and economic recessions. Instead of panicking, thinking creatively and thoughtfully about appropriate responses and using the information and resources we already have may help to diminish such fears and improve the safeguards that are needed to protect the integrity of families and keep children safe.

The forgotten students: COVID-19 response for youth and young adults aging out of foster care

AUTHOR(S)
Mauriell H. Amechi

Published: September 2020
As the COVID-19 epidemic surges on, studies suggest that people under the age of 40 account for a disproportionate number of new coronavirus cases. Unlike their counterparts, youth and young adults aging out of foster care typically have fewer support networks or safety nets to depend on in a crisis. Inaccessible medical insurance often compounds their situation further, which ultimately places them at an increased risk of experiencing the worst effects of COVID-19.
Cite this research | No. of pages: - | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: foster care, youth services | Countries: United States
2806 - 2820 of 3263

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.