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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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3016 - 3030 of 3316
Daring to ask, listen, and act: a snapshot of the impacts of COVID-19 on women and girls' rights and sexual and reproductive health
Published: July 2020
The overall purpose of this rapid assessment is to measure the impact of COVID-19 on gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health and rights among adolescent girls (defined as girls ages(10-17) and young women aged (18-24) in Jordan, including persons with disabili es (PwD).
The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for policy in relation to children and young people: a research review

AUTHOR(S)
Merike Darmody; Emer Smyth; Helen Russell

Institution: Economic and Social Research Institute
Published: July 2020
The report draws on existing and emerging Irish and international research on the effects of the pandemic restrictions on children and young people. In particular, the report reviews research evidence in the areas of family and peer relationships, health and wellbeing, education (from early childhood to third-level) and post-school transitions to provide insights into the potential consequences of the current crisis from infancy to early adulthood.
The effects of digital contact on children’s well-being: evidence from public and private law contexts

AUTHOR(S)
Padmini Iyer; Muslihah Albakri; Helen Burridge (et al.)

Institution: National Centre for Social Research
Published: July 2020

While the UK government has announced some relaxation of statutory regulations for children in care, advice at the time of writing indicates that local authorities in England and Wales remain obligated to allow looked-after children ‘reasonable contact’ with their birth families during the current COVID-19 lockdown. In light of this advice, it is crucial to understand how digital technologies can be managed to maintain contact while prioritising children’s best interests. This briefing paper highlights the key findings of a rapid evidence review that examines what is known about the implications of digital contact for the well-being of children who have been separated from their birth relatives in public law contexts. It also reviews relevant literature on digital contact in private law contexts, such as separation and divorce, and draws out key lessons for managing digital contact between birth relatives and children in public law placements.

Remote mental health interventions for young people

AUTHOR(S)
Karen James

Institution: Youth Access
Published: July 2020
A new report on remote mental health interventions for young people argues that remote services can improve access and lead to positive mental health outcomes, but that replacing face-to-face services with remote support could pose problems. The report analyses evidence from 50 academic studies on remote mental health interventions carried out across 9 countries.
Hidden violence: how COVID-19 school closures reduced the reporting of child maltreatment

AUTHOR(S)
Francisco Cabrera-Hernandez; Maria Padilla-Romo

Published: July 2020   Journal: University of Tennessee, Department of Economics Working Papers
This study examines how school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic affected the reporting of child maltreatment in Mexico City. This study uses a rich panel dataset on incident-level crime reports and victim characteristics and exploits the differential effects between school-age children and older individuals. While financial and mental distress due to the COVID-19 pandemic may result in additional cases of child maltreatment, synthetic control and difference-in-differences estimations document an average reduction in child maltreatment reports of 21% and 30%, respectively, with larger reductions among females and in higher-poverty municipalities. These results highlight the important role education professionals in school settings play in the early detection and reporting of domestic violence against school-age children.
COVID-19: How are Countries Preparing to Mitigate the Learning Loss as Schools Reopen? Trends and emerging good practices to support the most vulnerable children

AUTHOR(S)
Dita Nugroho; Chiara Pasquini; Nicolas Reuge; Diogo Amaro

Some countries are starting to reopen schools as others develop plans to do so following widespread and extended closures due to COVID-19. Using data from two surveys and 164 countries, this research brief describes the educational strategies countries are putting into place, or plan to, in order to mitigate learning impacts of extended school closures, particularly for the most vulnerable children. In addition, it highlights emerging good practices.

COVID‐19 pandemic‐related psychopathology in children and adolescents with mental illness

AUTHOR(S)
Oskar Hougaard Jefsen; Christopher Rohde; Bettina Nørremark (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease (COVID‐19) pandemic is likely to have negative health consequences way beyond those caused by the virus per se – including significant psychological distress. Children and adolescents who already live with a mental illness may be particularly vulnerable to the distress associated with the pandemic – due to, for example, fear of the virus as well as the significant societal changes launched to minimize spread of the virus (social distancing and quarantine). In this editorial perspective, this study (a) provides data on COVID‐19 pandemic‐related psychopathology in children and adolescents from a large psychiatric treatment setting in Denmark, (b) gives advice on how the likely harmful effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health of children and adolescents may be minimized, and (c) proposes six lines of research into pandemic‐related psychopathology with emphasis on children and adolescents.
How should our testing behavior change with time in children in current COVID‐19 pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Zhang; Jilei Lin; Hongmei Xu (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: European Journal of Clinical Investigation

More paediatric‐confirmed cases have been reported with the global pandemic of COVID‐19. This study aims to summarize the key points and supply suggestions on screening paediatric COVID‐19 patients more appropriately. We retrospectively included paediatric patients who have accepted SARS‐CoV‐2 RT‐PCR testing in Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (30 January 2020 to 13 February 2020) and compared them with paediatric‐confirmed COVID‐19 cases. Besides, a review was carried out by analysing all current literature about laboratory‐confirmed paediatric cases with COVID‐19.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, hospitalization, infectious disease | Countries: China
Parents' stress and children's psychological problems in families facing the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Spinelli; Francesca Lionetti; Massimiliano Pastore (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The present study aimed to explore the effect of risk factors associated with the COVID-19 outbreak experience on parents’ and children’s well-being. Parents of children aged between 2- and 14-years-old completed an online survey reporting their home environment conditions, any relation they had to the pandemic consequences, their difficulties experienced due to the quarantine, their perception of individual and parent-child dyadic stress, and their children’s emotional and behavioral problems.
Building trust within and across communities for health emergency preparedness: community engagement for behavioural and social change
Published: July 2020
Public trust in institutions in all parts of society is critical for health emergency preparedness. Leaders in government, science,public health,the private sector, international organizations, civil society,and the media are charged with identifying potential health risks and developing measures that will minimize their impact. But often, the threats are theoretical, something that may occur in the future, and difficult for many people to grasp as they address their very real day to day needs. It is only through empathy, accurate communications, community partnership, and effective actions that leaders generate the societal investments in resources and energy required to mitigate the effects of potential health hazards.Understanding the importance of public trust in institutions is especially critical during the COVID-19 outbreak,whose containment relies on the cooperative actions of business, NGOs,governments, communities and individuals.
Role of social determinants of health in widening maternal and child health disparities in the era of Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Deepa Dongarwar; Veronica B. Ajewole; Emmanuella Oduguwa (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: International Journal of MCH and AIDS
This article presents a conceptual model that describes the social determinants of health pathways contributing to worse outcomes in minority maternal and child health populations due to the current COVID-19 pandemic.
Containing the anxieties of children, parents and families from a distance during the Coronavirus pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jordan Bate; Norka Malberg

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

The coronavirus pandemic and the move to teletherapy has created uncertainty among both clinicians and patients. This paper will describe how the Mentalization-Based Treatment for Children (MBT-C) model offers a framework for an integrative approach that can inform treatment via teletherapy, so that clinicians can continue supporting young people and their families through this period.

Distance learning in the Arab World: report on the response of Arab countries to educational needs during the COVID-19 pandemic
Published: July 2020

The education systems in many countries have faced ample of challenges that emerged due to the COVID-19 pandemic as of the beginning of March 2020, which led to lockdown and closure of schools and universities. As a result, 86 million learner in Arab countries schooling were interrupted. As such, Arab countries found themselves forced to choose between two options, either to use distance learning or don’t provide education at all. Majority of countries have headed towards distance learning, to ensure the continuity and management of the teaching and learning. After three months of distance learning, it was necessary to evaluate this experience in its various aspects and to identify the most critical challenges faced, in addition to providing solutions that would advance the process of distance learning and its outcomes. In this regard, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in the Arab States in Beirut was keen on benefiting from the opinions of all targeted educational stakeholders who have not participated before in similar questionnaires.

Youth mental health in the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
E. Power; S. Hughes; D. Cotter (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine

Youth mental health is a rapidly developing field with a focus on prevention, early identification, treatment innovation and service development. In this perspective piece, the effects of COVID-19 on young people’s mental health is discussed. The psychosocial effects of COVID-19 disproportionately affect young people. Both immediate and longer-term factors through which young people are affected include social isolation, changes to the delivery of therapeutic services and almost complete loss of all structured occupations (school, work and training) within this population group. Longer-term mechanisms include the effects of the predicted recession on young people’s mental health. Opportunities within this crisis exist for service providers to scale up telehealth and digital services that may benefit service provision for young people’s mental health in the future.


COVID-19 aftershocks: out of time
Institution: World Vision
Published: July 2020

As families' incomes plummet, millions more children go hungry and are forced to work and beg. Millions of parents and caregivers have lost incomes and jobs due to COVID-19, forcing them to expose their children to harmful and dangerous circumstances, such as begging or child marriage. World Vision has conducted rapid assessments in 24 countries across Latin AmericaSub-Saharan Africa, and Asia confirming alarming predictions of increased child hunger, violence, and poverty due to the economic impact of COVID-19. These assessment results give further evidence that the most vulnerable families and their children are hardest hit in such crises. Those living in fragile countries already suffering from conflict, climate change, instability or displacement as well as those already receiving humanitarian assistance are suffering even greater injustices because of the pandemic.

3016 - 3030 of 3316

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Read the latest quarterly digest on violence against children and women during COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.