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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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3736 - 3750 of 4458
Parenting-related exhaustion during the Italian COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Marchetti; Lilybeth Fontanesi; Cristina Mazza (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Worldwide, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has generated significant worry, uncertainty, anxiety, sadness, and loneliness. In Italy, these effects have been particularly pronounced. While research on the COVID-19 outbreak has mainly focused on the clinical features of infected patients and the psychological impact on the general population and health professionals, no investigation has yet assessed the psychological impact of the pandemic on parents. The present research is a web-based survey of Italian parents to examine the prevalence of parenting-related exhaustion—and to identify its associated risk and protective factors—4 weeks into the lockdown.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 45 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 1114-1123 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, lockdown, mental health, parent-child relationship, parents, psychological distress | Countries: Italy
Evaluating the preparedness of child health facilities and health care providers to COVID 19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Abideen Salako; Oluwatosin Odubela; Tomilola Musari-Martins (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: European Journal of Preventive Medicine
The challenges of diagnosis of SARS-CoV2 infection in the paediatric population includes not only the mild nature of the disease, but the similarity in the symptomatology of the COVID-19 disease to common childhood illness, and the possibility that the infected children could be “silent transmitters” to the family members and health care workers [HCW]. The challenge raises the doubt on the level of preparedness, awareness of the child health facilities [HCF], and HCW in adopting measures at combatting the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study evaluated the preparedness and response of HCF and HCW in paediatric settings to the 2019-novel coronavirus pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 5 | No. of pages: 91-96 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, health care facilities, health personnel
Pregnant women with COVID-19 and risk of adverse birth outcomes and maternal-fetal vertical transmission: a population-based cohort study in Wuhan, China

AUTHOR(S)
Rong Yang; Hui Mei; Tongzhang Zheng (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: BMC Medicine volume
This is a retrospective cohort study based on the Maternal and Child Health Information System (MCHIMS) of Wuhan, China. All pregnant women with singleton live birth recorded by the system between January 13 and March 18, 2020, were included. The adverse birth outcomes were preterm birth, low birth weight, neonatal asphyxia, premature rupture of membrane (PROM), and cesarean section delivery. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between maternal COVID-19 diagnosis and adverse birth outcomes.
Parenting stress and risk of child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: a family stress theory-informed perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Wu; Yanfeng Xu

Published: October 2020   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
The risk of child maltreatment is heightened during the pandemic due to multiple COVID-19 related stressors, such as physical and mental health concerns, economic stress, challenges in homeschooling, marital conflicts and intimate personal violence, and intensified child–parent relationships. Both parental internal (e.g., parenting styles) and external resources (e.g., social support), and parental perceptions toward stressors will affect how parents cope with these stressors, which may exacerbate or mitigate the risk of child maltreatment. Guided by family stress theory, this article identifies COVID-19 related stressors at the family level, and further elaborates on how these stressors are associated with child maltreatment via parents’ resources, perceptions, and coping strategies. Implications for future practice and research are discussed.
The impact of COVID-19 on children from poor families in Ghana and the role of welfare institutions

AUTHOR(S)
Lorretta Domfeh Owusu; Kwabena Frimpong-Manso

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Children's Services
This paper is focused on answering the following questions: How are poor families surviving in this era of COVID-19? What is life for children from poor families? What has become of their reality? To understand the realities of poor families and children during COVID-19, specifically in Ghana, this paper aims to analyze how COVID-19 has affected children from poor families in Ghana and how welfare institutions can work to provide rapid help to such families.
COVID-19: the effect of lockdown on children’s remote learning experience: parents’ perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Datonye Christopher Briggs

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science
This online survey was done to explore parents’ perspectives on education of their children affected by the stay-at-home measures still ongoing in the country (Nigeria). A non-probability sampling technique was used in the recruitment of participants. The study questionnaire on a Google Doc Form was administered through WhatsApp instant messaging. Chi-square was used to test for differences, and statistical significance was set at p-value less than 0.05.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 33 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 42-52 | Language: French | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, parents, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: Nigeria
High levels of stress due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic among parents of children with and without chronic conditions across the USA

AUTHOR(S)
Miranda A. L. van Tilburg; Emily Edlynn; Marina Maddaloni (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children
The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unprecedented levels of stress for parents, especially those of children with chronic conditions. Mental health effects are expected to continue for months/years and preparation is needed to meet an increasing demand for mental health care.
COVID-19 in children across three Asian cosmopolitan regions

AUTHOR(S)
Gilbert T. Chua; Xiaoli Xiong; Eun Hwa Choi (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Emerging Microbes & Infections
As another wave of COVID-19 outbreak has approached in July 2020, a larger scale COVID-19 pediatric Asian cohort summarizing the clinical observations is warranted. Children confirmed with COVID-19 infection from the Republic of Korea, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and Wuhan, China, during their first waves of local outbreaks were included. Their clinical characteristics and the temporal sequences of the first waves of local paediatric outbreaks were compared.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 29 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, child mental health, multi-country
Parental burnout: moving the focus from children to parents

AUTHOR(S)
Moïra Mikolajczak; Isabelle Roskam

Published: October 2020
Parental burnout (PB)—a condition characterized by intense exhaustion related to parenting, emotional distancing from one's children, and a loss of parental fulfillment—has received increasing attention in recent years, even more since the worldwide COVID‐19 crisis and the confinement of parents with their children. This crisis put the spotlight on parents’ suffering, and the need to better understand parental burnout and how to best assess and treat it emerged as a priority. This brief article introduces the Thematic Issue of New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development focused on the measurement of parental burnout across various regions of the world. It briefly reviews the concept of parental burnout, its phenomenological experience, its etiology and consequences, and its measurement.
Cover
Gender Alert on COVID-19 Afghanistan
Institution: UN Women, *UNICEF, Human Rights Watch
Published: October 2020
Families already living in poverty, many of whom are internally displaced persons or returnees, have little ability to weather a new crisis. They will be most under pressure to relieve financial crises through child labor or child marriage. In addition to dropping out of school, education disruption puts girls and young women at increased risk of numerous abuses: child marriage, exploitation, child labor, early pregnancy, and gender-based violence. An increase in reported cases of child marriage within the first few weeks/months of the pandemic has been documented.

Girl-driven change: meeting the needs of adolescent girls during COVID-19 and beyond
Institution: CARE
Published: October 2020
As a result of the circumstances brought on by COVID-19, adolescent girls face a myriad of risks—ranging from an increased likelihood of exposure to violence and early marriage, to catastrophic learning, health and economic losses. This report draws upon available country data from CARE’s work as well as external sources, in order to highlight the initial impact of the pandemic on the health, well-being and safety of adolescent girls as well as their access to, and involvement in, essential services. It further provides examples of program adaptations developed during the pandemic to highlight the ways in which projects have continued to respond in targeted ways across sectors to the unique needs of girls.
COVID-19: Impact on Gender Dynamics in the Livelihoods Sector Within Crisis-Affected Countries
Institution: ACAPS
Published: October 2020
This report is an overview of the gendered impact of COVID-19 on the livelihoods, income and employment of women, men, girls, and boys in different countries affected by humanitarian crises. Children can be victims of economic violence during the pandemic. If they are involved in child labor, subjected to child marriage, and/or are withdrawn from school as their parents try to get some economic relief and further income through any of these measures, children’s livelihood chances and long-term economic prospects are deeply impacted, limiting their access to decent jobs and wages and endangering their mental and physical fitness for work for years to come.
COVID-19 secondary impacts on health- and protection-related issues
Institution: ACAPS
Published: October 2020

This thematic report provides global analysis on the gendered impact of the pandemic in key areas of humanitarian programming such as livelihood, income and employment or health and protection. Children who are exposed to the secondary impacts of the pandemic, such as reduced household income or closed schools, and who live in areas with reduced oversight mechanisms may face increased likelihood of child marriage, forced labor, or female genital mutilation.

A double-edged sword: protection risks facing Venezuelan children during the COVID-19 pandemic
Institution: World Vision
Published: October 2020
The problems that place children at greater risk during the pandemic are associated with the scarcity of food, an increase in child labor, child marriage, domestic violence and abandonment. 49 per cent report that child marriages have increased since March in a survey with 420 households.
Strengthening livelihoods and preventing child marriage in times of COVID-19
Institution: World Vision
Published: October 2020

UNFPA estimates that in addition to the 150 million girls at risk of child marriage pre-pandemic, the socio-economic impacts of COVID-19 will put an additional 13 million more girls at risk over the next 10 years. Out of that number, up to four million girls may be in danger of child marriage in the next two years alone, with most child marriages taking place in the immediate aftermath of a crisis.

3736 - 3750 of 4458

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

The second digest discussed children and violence during the pandemic.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.