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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 2315
The views of children in residential care on the COVID-19 lockdown: implications for and their well-being and psychosocial intervention

AUTHOR(S)
Carme Montserrat; Marta Garcia-Molsosa; Joan Llosada-Gistau (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

Recent international research has warned of the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on vulnerable children. However, little is known regarding the in-care population. This cross-sectional study aims too find out how children in residential care perceived the influence of the COVID-19 lockdown in their everyday life, relationships and subjective well-being. 856 children from 10 to 17 years old (Mage = 15.5, males = 71.2%, females = 28.8%) living in residential centres in Catalonia responded to an on-line questionnaire administered between June and July 2020. Bivariate analysis and multiple linear regression were used comparing the answers by sex.

Intentions of public school teachers in British Columbia, Canada to receive a COVID-19 vaccine

AUTHOR(S)
C. Sarai Racey; Robine Donken; Imogen Porter (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Vaccine X
To control the COVID-19 pandemic high vaccine acceptability and uptake will be needed. Teachers represent a priority population to minimize social disruption and ensure continuity in education, which is vital for the well-being and healthy development of youth during the pandemic. The objective of this analysis was to measure public school teachers’ intentions to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in British Columbia (BC), Canada.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, infectious disease, teachers, vaccination, vaccination policies | Countries: Canada
Understanding English teachers’ non-volitional use of online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic: a Chinese study

AUTHOR(S)
Fang Huang; Timothy Teo; Jiayi Guo

Published: July 2021   Journal: System
This study investigated factors influenced Chinese English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' non-volitional online teaching intentions based on an extended technology acceptance model (TAM). Facilitating conditions, technology complexity, and perceived anxiety were added to the original TAM as extended variables to examine their influence on Chinese EFL teachers' online teaching. Quantitative data were obtained from 158 teachers in Chinese primary and secondary schools and universities. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), and the extended TAM was found to be valid in explaining Chinese EFL teachers' online teaching intentions during quarantine. Teachers' behavioral intentions were significantly associated with their attitudes and perceived usefulness of online teaching.
Social isolation and anxiety disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in China

AUTHOR(S)
Shiyou Wu; Mengni Yao; Chunxia Deng (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
The COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown measures have had a profound impact on the emotions, anxiety, and mental health of affected communities. Despite this, there is a lack of knowledge about the possible generational and geographical differences in the effects on the mental health of individuals. This study examines the impact of COVID-19 related quarantine on symptoms of generalized anxiety disorders (GAD) among parents and children (N = 4503). It also compares the outcomes of residents from the initial COVID-19 epicenter of Wuhan to those in surrounding areas.
Parents’ intentions to vaccinate their children against COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kristine M. Ruggiero; John Wong; Casey Fryer Sweeney (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Health Care

With the COVID-19 vaccine rollout is well underway now beginning in children ages 12 and over, it is unknown what percent of parents plan to vaccinate their children against COVID-19. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine parents’ attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in administering a COVID-19 vaccine.

Promoting physical activity participation and nutrition education through a telehealth intervention for children on the autism spectrum and their caregivers

AUTHOR(S)
Leah R. Ketcheson; E. Andrew Pitchford

Published: July 2021   Journal: Contemporary Clinical Trials
There is growing empirical support which suggests children on the autism spectrum, as well as their caregivers experience significant health disparities. The global COVID-19 pandemic has only magnified the need to address health among vulnerable populations. While there has been a growing trend in the delivery of telehealth interventions, the delivery of such methods for children on the autism spectrum, and their caregivers remains relatively under examined. The primary goal of PLANE (Physical Literacy And Nutrition Education) is to promote positive trajectories of health for children on the autism spectrum and their primary caregivers through the delivery of a telehealth physical activity and nutrition education program. The study is a pre-experimental analysis of PLANE across 12 months.
Effects of COVID-19 imposed school closure on school feeding program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

AUTHOR(S)
Tefera Darge Delbis; Messay Gebremariam Kotecho; Fekadu Mulugeta Asfaw

Published: July 2021   Journal: Social Sciences & Humanities Open
The school feeding program in government schools in Addis Ababa was interrupted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The study employed a qualitative research to explore the effects of the interruption on students' well-being. The study participants were recruited from seven primary schools within six sub-cities of Addis Ababa using convenience sampling. Fifty-three in-depth interviews were conducted with students, parents, teachers, school principals, and school feeding agency officials. Thematic analysis was then conducted.
COVID-19 and the mental health of children with respiratory illness

AUTHOR(S)
Ian P. Sinha; Ruth Murphy; Holly Biffin (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine
Children and young people have been deeply affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Lockdowns and new ways of living have necessitated massive adjustments. Despite heroic efforts from teachers, there has been a huge impact on education, and children lost the psychosocial benefits of being in school. News coverage is incessant, and polarised narratives and opinions are amplified in social media echo-chambers. In this report, co-authored with an adolescent from our clinic, we discuss the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and young people with respiratory problems.
Family-friendly policies for workers in the informal economy
The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented, disastrous impact on the ability of people to balance work and care for their children and families. This policy brief is an outcome of a collaboration between Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO), UNICEF and the International Labour Organization (ILO) in advocating for family-friendly policies to protect and ensure social protection and care systems that are good for children, good for women and good for the economy. The policy brief features an increased focus on the well-being and working conditions of caregivers in the informal economy and their children’s development in low- and middle-income countries. The brief highlights the need to consider sustainable policy and protection responses instead of quick, short-term measures for more gender-transformative and equitable solutions. This represents a critical gap which, if not addressed, will make our goals to tackle child poverty, hunger and gender inequality – and fulfil the SDGs – impossible to achieve. 
Violence and abuse experiences and associated risk factors during the COVID-19 outbreak in a population-based sample of Norwegian adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Else-Marie Augusti; Sjur Skjørshammer Sætren; Gertrud S. Hafstad

Published: July 2021   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

The lockdowns occurring across society because of the COVID-19 pandemic have had far-reaching consequences for children and adolescents. One immediate concern was what the impact of the comprehensive disease control measures on rates of violence and abuse against children and adolescents would be. This study aimed to establish rates of child abuse and degree of family conflict during the first COVID-19 lockdown spring 2020. Additionally, we aimed to investigate associations between preexisting and concurrent risk factors and abuse during these unique times.

Unequal experience of COVID-induced remote schooling in four developing countries

AUTHOR(S)
Mobarak Hossain

Institution: Young Lives
Published: July 2021   Journal: International Journal of Educational Development
Lockdown measures during the pandemic have resulted in school closure worldwide affecting nearly 9 out of 10 students. Consequently, remote schooling has become a growing phenomenon. However, due to a lack of infrastructural capacity and widespread poverty, the experience of remote learning in developing countries may have been unequal by pupils’ socioeconomic status, gender and location. This study draws evidence from a phone survey conducted by Young Lives (YL) in Ethiopia, two states of India, Peru and Vietnam enquiring which sociodemographic groups are benefiting more from remote schooling.
The role of a mentorship program on the relationship between neglect and depression among adolescents in low-income families

AUTHOR(S)
Jaewon Lee; Jennifer Allen; Hyejung Lim (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
This study examines the moderating effect of a mentorship program on the relationship between parental neglect and depression among adolescents from low-income households since COVID-19. A total of 264 participants from all provinces in South Korea were registered for a mentorship program provided by the Korea Development Bank [KDB] Foundation, which is a charitable and non-profit organization. Two-hundred fifty-five middle and high school students from low-income families were included in the final sample.
Determinant of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccine among school teachers in Gondar City, Northwest Ethiopia

AUTHOR(S)
Simegnew Handebo; Maereg Wolde; Kegnie Shitu

Published: June 2021   Journal: Plos One

Scientists across the world are working on innovating a successful vaccine that will save lives and end COVID-19 pandemic. World Health Organization (WHO) is working to make sure COVID-19 vaccines can be safely delivered to all those who need them. Indeed, the successful deployment and a sufficient uptake of vaccines is equally important. Acceptance and accessibility of such vaccine is a key indicator of vaccination coverage. This study aimed to assess the determinants of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccine among school teachers in Gondar City.

Challenges in maternal and child health services delivery and access during pandemics or public health disasters in low-and middle-income countries: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Krushna Chandra Sahoo; Sapna Negi; Kripalini Patel (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Healthcare
Maternal and child health (MCH) has been a global priority for many decades and is an essential public health service. Ensuring seamless delivery is vital for desirable MCH outcomes. This systematic review outlined the challenges in accessing and continuing MCH services during public health emergencies—pandemics and disasters. A comprehensive search approach was built based on keywords and MeSH terms relevant to ‘MCH services’ and ‘pandemics/disasters’. The online repositories Medline, CINAHL, Psyc INFO, and Epistemonikos were searched for studies. We included twenty studies—seven were on the Ebola outbreak, two on the Zika virus, five related to COVID-19, five on disasters, and one related to conflict situations. The findings indicate the potential impact of emergencies on MCH services. Low utilization and access to services have been described as common challenges. The unavailability of personal safety equipment and fear of infection were primary factors that affected service delivery. The available evidence, though limited, indicates the significant effect of disasters and pandemics on MCH. However, more primary in-depth studies are needed to understand better the overall impact of emergencies, especially the COVID-19 pandemic, on MCH.
Student engagement in K12 online education during the pandemic: the case of Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Gökçe Kurt; Derin Atay; Huriye Arzu Öztürk

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Research on Technology in Education
Student engagement has become a challenge for K-12 students and teachers in online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study explored the factors underlying student engagement and the strategies teachers developed to engage students. Thematically analyzed interview data coming from 22 teachers and 20 students of public high schools revealed teachers’ and students’ similar perceptions of the factors affecting student engagement. The four themes identified were instructional and student related factors along with those related to the learning environment and policies. The teacher strategies for the facilitation of student engagement were instructional, managerial, and affective. Teachers also discussed which of these strategies were helpful in fostering student engagement.
31 - 45 of 2315

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.