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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 4458
Adapting parent-focused interventions for diverse caregivers of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities: Lessons learned during global crises

AUTHOR(S)
Sandra B. Vanegas; Ana D. Dueñas; Megan Kunze (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
Parent-focused interventions have been designed to provide training and support to caregivers who are essential in achieving positive outcomes for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). In 2020, significant crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic and continued racial tensions, profoundly impacted the livelihood of children with IDD and their families. Many ongoing efforts to address disparities among this population were halted temporarily and required further adaptations. Researchers adapted interventions and support to address the disparities impacting children with IDD and their families with limited guidance. This study provides a descriptive case analysis of four parent-focused interventions that responded to the global crises to continue serving children with IDD and their families.
Change in weight category among youth early in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ihuoma Eneli; Jinyu Xu; Keeley Pratt

Published: April 2022   Journal: Clinical Obesity
Remote learning and shelter-in-place orders during the COVID-19 pandemic are associated with obesity risk factors such as decreased physical activity, altered routines and sleep schedules, increased screen time, and non-nutritious food choices. The objective of this brief report is to describe change in weight category 3–6 months after the onset of the pandemic in a cohort of 4509 low-income youth. Inclusion criteria were youth aged 2–17 years with weight and height measure in a large primary care network between 1 January and 30 March 2020 (Q1), designated as pre-COVID period; and 1 June–30 September 2020, (Q3), as early-COVID period. Change in weight category was assessed between Q1 and Q3. Adjusting for visit type and time lapse, logistic regression was conducted to examine the association between weight category change and age, sex, and race/ethnicity.
Alienated and unsafe: Experiences of the first national UK COVID-19 lockdown for vulnerable young people (aged 11–24 years) as revealed in Web-based therapeutic sessions with mental health professionals

AUTHOR(S)
Charlotte Mindel; Louisa Salhi; Crystal Oppong (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Counselling and Psychotherapy Research

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have disproportionately affected young people, and those who are vulnerable are disadvantaged further. Here, we seek to understand the experiences of vulnerable young people accessing Web-based therapeutic support during the pandemic and early lockdown, as revealed through the observations of mental health professionals. Four focus groups with 12 professionals from a digital mental health service were conducted to understand the experiences of vulnerable young people during the pandemic lockdown. Workshops with young people with diverse experiences resulted in the co-design of the focus group topic guide and the interpretation and validation of analysis. The experiential inductive–deductive framework of thematic analysis was used to analyse the workshop transcripts.

Effects of remote education during the COVID-19 pandemic on young children's learning and academic behavior in Georgia: perceptions of parents and school administrators

AUTHOR(S)
Jill V. Klosky; Julie A. Gazmararian; Olivia Casimir (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of School Health

In Spring 2020, Georgia public schools implemented remote learning to manage the spread of COVID-19. This study explores the effects of remote schooling on the learning of young children in Georgia during the early COVID-19 pandemic from the perspectives of school administrators and essential working parents. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted with eight school administrators and 26 essential working parents of children in kindergarten through third grades of two rural and two urban schools in Georgia. Data collection included online surveys, virtual interviews and focus groups. Descriptive analyses of the demographics provided context to emerging themes from qualitative data.

The impact of the COVID-19 school closures on families with children with disabilities: a qualitative analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Molly Lipkin; Franci Crepeau-Hobson

Published: April 2022   Journal: Psychology in the Schools
The unprecedented school closures in response to COVID-19 have been associated with a number of negative impacts on students and their families. In addition to these difficulties, parents of students with disabilities are faced with prepandemic stresses and challenges that may be exacerbated by the school closures. This qualitative study aimed to investigate the experiences and struggles of parents of children identified with a disability during the COVID-19 school closures. The 15 participants were parents of children with a range of disabilities, including Autism, Down Syndrome, ADHD, and learning disabilities.
COVID-19 among Chinese high school graduates: Psychological distress, growth, meaning in life and resilience

AUTHOR(S)
Yongju Yu; Yongjuan Yu; Jiangxia Hu

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Health Psychology
This study examined perceived impact of COVID-19 (PIC) on mental health outcomes (anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic growth) and roles of resilience and meaning in life. In October 2020, 430 Chinese high school graduates completed self-report measures. Results showed that 4.4% and 5.8% participants had anxiety and depression symptoms (⩾10), respectively, while 13.3% developed posttraumatic growth (⩾37.5). Resilience and meaning in life mediated the relationships between PIC and mental health outcomes. These findings underline psychological distress and growth coexisted in COVID-19, while resilience and meaning in life served as important protective factors of mental health.
Did children in single-parent households have a higher probability of emotional instability during the COVID-19 pandemic? A nationwide cross-sectional study in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Takuto Naito; Yasutake Tomata; Tatsui Otsuka (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The influence of public health measures against COVID-19 in Japan on child mental health by household type is unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether COVID-19 and the declaration of a state of emergency in Japan affected children’s mental health between single-parent and two-parent households disproportionately. A large cross-sectional online survey was conducted from August to September 2020. The study included 3365 parents with children aged 0–14 years old who reported their children’s mental status during the declared state of emergency. Emotional instability was reported dichotomously by parents. As the primary result, the probability of emotional instability was higher in single-parent households compared with that in two-parent households after adjustments for potential covariates; the adjusted prevalence ratio (95% CI) was 1.26 (1.07–1.49).
Family resilience during COVID-19 pandemic: a literature review

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Gayatri; Dian Kristiani Irawaty

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Family Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic has spread rapidly in many countries. This pandemic has led to short-term as well as long-term psychosocial and mental health implications for all family members. The magnitude of family resilience is determined by many vulnerability factors like developmental age, educational status, preexisting mental health condition, being economically underprivileged or being quarantined due to infection or fear of infection. PubMed, SCOPUS, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane, and ProQuest were searched from the inception of the pandemic to December 31, 2020. Articles were screened for inclusion by Authors.
Youth vaping during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic period: adjusted annual changes in vaping between the pre-COVID and initial COVID-lockdown waves of the COMPASS study

AUTHOR(S)
Scott T. Leatherdale; Richard E. Bélanger; Rabi Joël Gansaonré (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Nicotine & Tobacco Research

Adolescence is a critical period for vaping onset. The purpose of this article was to examine the effect of the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic period on youth vaping. We used 3-year linked data from the COMPASS study, including 7585 Canadian (Quebec, Ontario) adolescents from which 1949 completed all three survey waves (pre-COVID-19 [2018, 2019] and online [2020] during the early pandemic period [May–July 2020]) and provided vaping data. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and difference-in-difference (DD) models were used to estimate pre-COVID-19 to initial COVID-19 pandemic period change (2019–2020) in vaping (monthly, weekly, daily) compared with 2018–2019 change to adjust for age-related effects. Models were adjusted for age of entry into the cohort and sociodemographic characteristics.

What is the burnout of mothers with infants and toddlers during the COVID-19 pandemic? In relation to parenting stress, depression, and parenting efficacy

AUTHOR(S)
Jeong-Hyo Seo; Hee-Kyung Kim

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmrntal Research and Public Health
The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors influencing burnout of mothers with infants or toddlers in the COVID-19 pandemic. The subjects of this study were 105 mothers who sent their children to daycare centers or kindergartens located in S and G cities. They were women who have experienced caring for children entirely at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Man–Whitney U test, Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and a stepwise multiple regression using the SPSS Window 25.0 program.
Effect of orange almond potato cookies supplementation on the nutritional status of underweight preschool-aged children during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Fatma Fatmah; Nur Asiah; Etty Rekawati (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Plos One
Most undernourished preschool-aged children have low hemoglobin and albumin levels, which leads to a higher risk of infections, including COVID-19. This study was designed to determine whether potato almond orange cookies increase weight, hemoglobin, and albumin) in undernourished preschool-aged children during the COVID-19 pandemic. A pre-post intervention study was conducted with 30 subjects during 8 weeks in which hemoglobin and albumin levels were recorded at the beginning and end. Education on balanced nutrition was provided to mothers using leaflets, flipcharts, and videos.
Changes in type 2 diabetes trends in children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Schmitt; Ambika P. Ashraf; David J. Becker (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism

There is concern that the growing incidence of pediatric type 2 diabetes (T2D) may have been further exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. To examine whether trends in new-onset pediatric T2D—inclusive of patients requiring hospitalization and patients managed as outpatients—were impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to compare patient characteristics prior to and during COVID-19. A retrospective single-center medical record review was conducted in a hospital which cares for 90% of Alabama’s pediatric T2D patients. Patients with new-onset T2D referred from March 2017 to March 2021 were included. Counts of patients presenting per month (“monthly rates”) were computed. Linear regression models were estimated for the full sample and stratified by Medicaid and non-Medicaid insurance status. Patient characteristics prior to vs during COVID-19 were compared.

Experiences of children with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden: a qualitative interview study

AUTHOR(S)
Anna Erica Fäldt; Filippa Klint; Georgina Warner (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with disabilities has been described as a ‘triple jeopardy’. Not only have they experienced the negative social impacts of disease control measures, but access to required health services has been affected, and, not least, they are at increased risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19. This study aimed to determine how children with disabilities have experienced the pandemic in Sweden and its impact on their lives.Six children (5–13 years) were interviewed via video conferencing. An interview guide was adapted based on the children’s communicative abilities and included augmentative and alternative communication support. Reflective field notes were included in the analysis. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Use of telehealth in the management of adolescent eating disorders: patient perspectives and future directions suggested from the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sasha Gorrell; Erin E. Reilly; Leigh Brosof (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics
Efforts to increase accessibility of eating disorder (ED) treatment via telemedicine have been ongoing for the past decades. However, there has been a recent surge in research focused on remote delivery of interventions since the onset of the novel coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) in 2020, the related lockdowns, and an exponential increase in ED symptoms in youth secondary to the pandemic worldwide. The current review provides a focused summary of existing literature regarding telehealth for the treatment of EDs in adolescents using a frame of past, present, and future work. Specifically, it begins with a brief overview of research in remote delivery for EDs in youth prior to 2020. Then, it details more recent studies in this domain, with a focus on research conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. It closes by outlining limitations of the existing data and future steps necessary to expand the rigor and impact of this work.
Child development and distance learning in the age of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Hugues Champeaux; Lucia Mangiavacchi; Francesca Marchetta (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
School closures, forcibly brought about by the COVID-19 crisis in many countries, have impacted children’s lives and their learning processes. The heterogeneous implementation of distance learning solutions is likely to bring a substantial increase in education inequality, with long term consequences. The present study uses data from a survey collected during Spring 2020 lockdown in France and Italy to analyze parents’ evaluations of their children’s home schooling process and emotional well-being at time of school closure, and the role played by different distance learning methods in shaping these perceptions.
31 - 45 of 4458

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.