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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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5881 - 5895 of 6383
Creatively cope stress of children during lockdown: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Mansi Dwivedi; Vaibhav Srivastava

Published: September 2020   Journal: The International Journal of Indian Psychȯlogy
This paper aims to identify the signs of stress in children during lockdown in India and to help children coping with their psychological stress during lockdown in India.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 326-330 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, child well-being, lockdown, psychological distress | Countries: India
The review of the international voices on the responses of the worldwide school closures policy searching during Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sardjana Orba Manullang; Erwinsyah Satria

Published: September 2020   Journal: Jurnal Iqra'
This article was to determine the voice of the international community in responding to the challenges of school closure policies during the 2019 Covid-19 pandemic. In order to understand the impacts and challenges of school closure, a series of critical searches were under taken on various online sources, for instance news updates publications , practitioners, and school reactions to unplanned global policies to obligate students learning from home.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, school attendance
Reimagining parents' educational involvement during the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Doria Daniels

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This paper argues that under emergency conditions such as Covid-19, the strategies that the official educational establishment imposed to retain the formal curriculum are unjust. The abnormal educational circumstances require that education prioritise the well-being and safety of schoolchildren. Furthermore, the parental educational role needs to be reimagined for its value in advancing educational goals.
Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 134-147 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, parental guidance, parents education, remote learning | Countries: South Africa
School lessons from the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Taylor

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This article draws on recent literature spawned by the Covid-19 outbreak, together with related research studies and a survey of 16 South African families undertaken in April 2020 at the start of the national lockdown. A qualitative case study method was adopted and telephonic interviews conducted with the main caregiver and up to two children in each family in order to understand how learning at home might be promoted.
Every child is a national (playing) asset: a portrait of a Soweto boy's contradictory worlds of play and performance before and during the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Shafika Isaacs

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This paper deliberately places under a microscope, a township boychild named Kabelo, who is labelled in the formal education system as underperforming, learning-disabled and cognitively challenged. Kabelo epitomises the pattern of boy academic underperformance in South Africa and worldwide, particularly in reading and literacy. This pattern feeds a dominant narrative about systemic learning deficits that risks the stigmatisation of academically underperforming children whose lives intersect with stubborn structural inequality, and renders them invisible as capable, playful children.
Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 116-133 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, play, social inequality | Countries: South Africa
Pros and cons of e-learning by children in rural areas during lockdown situation and ways to empower it

AUTHOR(S)
Desam Sudhakar Reddy; L. S. R. C. V. Ramesh

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Innovative technology and Research
E-learning for children in rural and remote areas during lockdown is beyond reach for many where internet facilities are poor. Since, Primary Health care of rural students remains key concern, stress on e-learning becomes prerequisite during covid-19 lockdown.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 7-9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, e-learning, lockdown, rural families | Countries: India
The influence of classroom seating arrangement on children's cognitive processes in primary school: The role of individual variables

AUTHOR(S)
Valentina Tobia; Simona Sacchi; Veronica Cerina

Published: September 2020
To date, despite the great debate regarding the best seating arrangement for learning in classrooms, no empirical studies have examined the direct effects of different seating arrangements on children’s cognitive processes. This is particularly important nowadays that the COVID-19 measures include maintaining distance in the classroom. Aim of this study was experimentally investigating the effect of changing the seating arrangement (clusters vs. rows and columns), on logical reasoning, creativity and theory of mind, in children attending primary school. Furthermore, some individual characteristics (e.g., gender, loneliness, popularity) were analysed as potential moderators.
COVID-19 and violence against women and children: a second research round up

AUTHOR(S)
Amber Peterman; Megan O'Donnel

Institution: Center for Global Development
Published: September 2020

COVID-19 has raised the profile of violence against women and children (VAW/C) within the global discourse. Nine months after the emergence of COVID-19, global stakeholders continue to advocate for increased funding and action to mitigate against the risk of violence on vulnerable populations and support survivors. How much have we learned from research since the beginning of the crisis?

COVID-19 response measures and violence against children

AUTHOR(S)
Amiya Bhatia; Camilla Fabbri; Ilan Cerna-Turoff (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Bulletin of the World Health Organization
In the early stages of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response, children were described as invisible carriers who posed a risk of infection to others. Here we outline how responses to COVID-19 may increase children’s exposure to violence and neglect. We also highlight ongoing efforts to address violence against children and argue for continued action and research on violence prevention within the COVID-19 response.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 98 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 581-644 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: child protection measures, COVID-19 response, violence against children
Children, dying parents and COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Steve Marshall; Andrew Rowland; Susan Higgins (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: British Journal of Child Health
This paper evaluates the impact that COVID-19 pandemic had on children’s involvement when a parent is dying in the UK. Culturally competent, evidence-based services should be urgently commissioned to meet the holistic needs of children when a parent is dying with COVID-19 to reduce the risks of long-term harm.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 1 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, death | Countries: United Kingdom
Reimagining homelessness assistance for children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Duffield

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Children and Poverty

The homelessness response system in the United States is dominated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD’s definition of homelessness, program models, metrics, data, approaches, and goals have overshadowed those of other federal agencies. This policy brief argues that children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness have been poorly served by HUD’s dominance, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.The paper draws from research, policy analyses, and testimonies of parents, service providers, and educators to make the case for a reimagined homelessness response that is child-centered and oriented toward long-term goals of economic independence, health, and wellness.

From unnoticed to invisible: the impact of COVID‐19 on children and young people experiencing domestic violence and abuse

AUTHOR(S)
Ben Kieran Donagh

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

This paper provides an overview of the impact that COVID‐19 has had on specialist services delivering support to children and young people experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA). The target audience includes professionalsworking with young people in a range of settings including schools, youthclubs and statutory services. This understanding also contributes valuableinsight for those with a strategic or commissioning responsibility to providesupport services for children and young people.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 29 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: abused children, child care services, child protection measures | Countries: United Kingdom
Decrease of respiratory diseases in one social children welfare institute in Shanxi Province during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
B. Liu; Q. F. Han; W. P. Liang

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Public Health
This study surveyed and analyzed common diseases among children under the age of 14 in one social children welfare institute in Shanxi Province from January to May in 2018–2020 by the year-on-year method. In view of the above anti-epidemic measures, it indicates that the children gathering institutions should strengthen effective personal protection and public health management to reduce infectious disease among children.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, institutionalized children, respiratory diseases | Countries: China
Sensory influences in children due to online classes in the COVID  Era

AUTHOR(S)
Raghu Nandhan; Mohan Kameswaran

Published: September 2020   Journal: Otolaryngology: Open Access
School education has undergone a drastic change in recent timesdue to the Covid-19 Pandemic. The global choice today is delivering remote virtual learning thanks to the availability of internet technology and this has evolved into a 'New Normal'. Both teachers and students are slowly adapting to the art of online classes and are finding ways to engage in learning activity akin to the erstwhile schooling.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, school attendance | Countries: India
COVID-19 and children with diabetes-updates, unknowns, and next steps: first, do no extrapolation

AUTHOR(S)
Linda A. Di Meglio; Anastasia Albanese-O’Neill; Cynthia E. Muñoz (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Diabetes Care
This study is about how COVID-19 is affecting children with both new-onset and established diabete.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health | Countries: United States
5881 - 5895 of 6383

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Check our quarterly thematic digests on children and COVID-19

Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.