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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1051 - 1065 of 1116
Clinical characteristics of children with COVID-19: a rapid review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Zijun Wang; Qi Zhou; Chenglin Wang (et al.)

Published: April 2020   Journal: Annals of Translational Medicine

Most guidelines on COVID-19 published so far include recommendations for patients regardless of age. Clinicians need a more accurate understanding of the clinical characteristics of children with COVID-19. This review searched studies reporting clinical characteristics in children with COVID-19 published until March 31, 2020. It screened the literature, extracted the data and evaluated the risk of bias and quality of evidence of the included studies. It combined some of the outcomes (symptoms) in a single-arm meta-analysis using a random-effects model.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, COVID-19
Clinical characteristics of COVID-19 infection in newborns and pediatrics: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Latif Panahi; Marzieh Amiri; Somaye Pouy

Published: April 2020   Journal: Archives of Academic Emergency Medicine.
World Health Organization has declared COVID-19 a pandemic and a global health emergency. Thus, it is necessary to clearly characterize clinical manifestations and management of COVID-19 infection in children to provide accurate information for healthcare workers. Accordingly, the present study was designed to review articles published on clinical manifestations and characteristics of children and infants with COVID-19.
Cite this research | Vol.: 8 | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, COVID-19
Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in children and adolescents: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Riccardo Castagnoli; Martina Votto; Amelia Licari

Published: April 2020   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics
This review aims to evaluate currently reported pediatric cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection. An extensive search strategy was designed to retrieve all articles published from December 1, 2019, to March 3, 2020, by combining the terms coronavirus and coronavirus infection in several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL), and following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Retrospective cross-sectional and case-control studies, case series and case reports, bulletins, and national reports about the pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection were included. The risk of bias for eligible observational studies was assessed according to the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology reporting guideline.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 882-889 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, COVID-19
Ensuring availability of food for child nutrition amidst the Covid–19 pandemic: challenges and way forward

AUTHOR(S)
Madhu Kumari Upadhyay; Somdatta Patra; Amir Maroof Khan

Published: April 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Community Health
Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic spread in India is steeply rising. A 21-day lockdown has been imposed by the Government of India, to curtail its spread. This has impacted all walks of life, including the availability of food, and nutrition related services. This will impact nutritional status of children throughout India. The two major schemes, i.e. the Integrated Child Development Scheme and the Mid-day meal services scheme have also been affected leading to a risk of worsening of child nutrition. Some states have evolved their own strategies to mitigate the effect of lockdown during this crisis period. Here we discuss the challenges and way forward related to ensuring availability of food for child nutrition during this health crisis.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 32 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 251-254 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Nutrition, Child Protection | Tags: child nutrition, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: India
CARE rapid gender analysis for COVID 19 East, Central and Southern Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Everjoy Mahuku; Kalkidan Lakew Yihun; Karl Deering (et al.)

Institution: CARE
Published: April 2020

Women and men, girls and boys, urban and rural populations in East, Central and Southern Africa are being impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Immediate impacts at the time of this research center around reduced income and access to basic needs due to government lockdowns, changing gender roles in households, and increased gender-based violence. The COVID-19 pandemic in East, Central and Southern Africa is currently exacerbating socio-economic issues, with women bearing the largest burden of caring for their families while also seeking to lead communities in prevention and adaptation. Gender-based inequality is extensive in the region. Women are at a higher risk for exposure to infection due to the fact that they are often the primary caregivers in the family and constitute most of frontline healthcare responders. Women and girls are at increased risk of violence during the COVID-19 period. Further, women are more likely to lose income as many are in the informal sector.

Mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on food and nutrition of schoolchildren
While cases of COVID-19 appear to be fewer among children (and symptoms generally milder), national responses to the pandemic can have important consequences for child nutrition and educational outcomes.
Investing in the early years during COVID-19
Institution: The World Bank
Published: April 2020
Young children need comprehensive nurturing care which includes good health, adequate nutrition, early learning opportunities, responsive caregiving, and safety and security. Severe, lifelong impacts can result from deprivations during the early years if children do not have these critical inputs to ensure optimal child development. The World Bank’s Investing in the Early Years framework lays out three pillars to ensure children reach their full potential: i. Children are healthy and well-nourished, especially in the first 1,000 days ii. Children receive early stimulation and learning opportunities and iii. Children are nurtured and protected from stress. In the following three pages, we set out specific risks that children face under each of these pillars due to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) crisis, together with response options, potential platforms and country examples. While health and nutrition are key elements of the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) emergency response and are more likely to be addressed immediately, empowering parents to provide warm and responsive caregiving and ensuring safety and security of young children and early learning opportunities for young children is essential and risks falling through the cracks.
Gender dimensions of the COVID-19 pandemic
Institution: The World Bank
Published: April 2020
Experiences from previous pandemics and large-scale shocks show that these crises often affect men and women differently. Specifically, the effectiveness of policy actions and the prevention of costly reversals in the progress achieved towards greater gender equality will crucially depend on how gender considerations are reflected in the examination of potential impacts of and responses to COVID-19. Not only women and girls can be expected to be impacted differently, but they can also play different roles in the response vis-à-vis men and boys that could enhance the likelihood of success.
15 ways to support young children and their families in the COVID-19 response
Institution: The World Bank
Published: April 2020
As the global COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic continues to unfold, young children will be especially vulnerable. World Bank teams can work with client countries to support early childhood development (ECD) by leveraging a range of interventions and mechanisms that will be part of the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) response in every country. The report has three key messages : The early years are a critical period to build human capital. Young children are disproportionately at risk and must be prioritized in COVID-19 (Coronavirus) responses. We will reach young children by supporting parents and caregivers.
Promoting positive gender roles in marketing and advertising during COVID-19 : key considerations for business
Institution: *UNICEF, UN Women
Published: April 2020 UNICEF Publication
In an effort to address the impacts of COVID-19, companies are making a number of socially beneficial communications to the public. It is essential that these communications avoid harmful stereotypes and seek to depict positive and progressive gender portrayals. This document provides considerations for corporate entities currently creating socially beneficial communications.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: communication, gender roles, social inequality
The implications of COVID-19 for the children of Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Fatima Mustafa; Robin J. Green

Published: April 2020   Journal: The South African Medical Journal
COVID-19 is an emerging problem that can potentially put intolerable strain on a health system that is fragile and likely to collapse, such as those that exist in Africa. Extraordinary times like these require ingenious statesmanship and astutely calculated plans to see a nation emerge through the crisis. And in such a crisis, special attention needs to be directed to the healthcare system, where medical attention, equipment and interventions need to be carefully rationed.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 110 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 1 (447) | Language: English | Topics: Health, Social Protection, Well-being and Equity | Tags: health care facilities, health services | Countries: South Africa
COVID-19: Reducing the risk of infection might increase the risk of intimate partner violence

AUTHOR(S)
N. van Gelder; Amber Peterman; Alina Potts

Published: April 2020   Journal: The Lancet E Clinical Medicine
The ongoing pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2, the causal agent of the acute respiratory distress syndrome COVID-19, is placing unprecedented stress on healthcare systems and societies as a whole. The rapid spread of the virus in the absence of targeted therapies or a vaccine, is forcing countries to respond with strong preventative measures ranging from mitigation to containment. In extreme cases, quarantines are being imposed, limiting mobility to varying degrees.
While quarantines are an effective measure of infection control, they can lead to significant social, economic and psychological consequences. Social distancing fosters isolation; exposes personal and collective vulnerabilities while limiting accessible and familiar support options. The inability to work has immediate economic repercussions and deprives many individuals of essential livelihoods and health care benefits. Psychological consequences may range from stress, frustration and anger to severe depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A recent review drawing on lessons from past pandemics shows the length of quarantine increases the risk for serious psychological consequences.

Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Family Planning and Ending Gender-based Violence, Female Genital Mutilation and Child Marriage
Institution: UNFPA - United Nations Population Fund
Published: April 2020   Journal: UNFPA Brief
UNFPA aims to achieve three world-changing results by 2030, the deadline for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. These are: Ending unmet need for family planning, ending gender-based violence including harmful practices such as female genital mutilation and child marriage, and ending all preventable maternal deaths. COVID-19 pandemic could critically undermine progress made towards achieving these goals.
A UN framework for the immediate socio-economic response to COVID-19
Institution: United Nations
Published: April 2020
This report sets out the framework for the United Nations’ urgent socio-economic support to countries and societies in the face of COVID-19, putting in practice the UN Secretary-General’s Shared Responsibility, Global Solidarity report on the same subject. It is one of three critical components of the UN’s efforts to save lives, protect people, and rebuild better, alongside the health response, led by the World Health Organization (WHO), and the humanitarian response, as detailed in the UN-led COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan.
A violência contra mulheres, crianças e adolescentes em tempos de pandemia pela COVID-19: panorama, motivações e formas de enfrentamento

AUTHOR(S)
Emanuele Souza Marques; Claudia Leite de Moraes; Maria Elena Hasselmann (et al.)

Published: April 2020   Journal: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
This article reviews the repercussions of social distance in interpersonal relationships, especially between intimate partners and between parents and children. Based on previous situations of social distancing and the sudden increase in the record of cases of violence in the context of a pandemic, international organizations researchers and media  are concerned with the signs of increased domestic violence and abuse.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 36 | Issue: 4 | Language: Portuguese
1051 - 1065 of 1116

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.