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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1066 - 1080 of 1420
Mental health of pregnant and postpartum women in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah E. D. Perzow; Ella-Marie P. Hennessey; M. Camille Hoffman (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders Reportas
The COVID-19 pandemic has been uniquely challenging for pregnant and postpartum women. Uncontrollable stress amplifies risk for maternal depression and anxiety, which are linked to adverse mother and child outcomes. This study examined change in internalizing symptoms from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic among pregnant and postpartum women longitudinally, and investigated moderation by loneliness and other contextual risk factors.
Intentions to seek mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic among Chinese pregnant women with probable depression or anxiety: cross-sectional, web-based survey study

AUTHOR(S)
Qian Wang; Bo Song; Jiangli Di (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: JMIR Mental Health
Mental health problems are prevalent among pregnant women, and it is expected that their mental health will worsen during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, the underutilization of mental health services among pregnant women has been widely documented. This study aimed to identify factors that are associated with pregnant women’s intentions to seek mental health services, it specifically assessed pregnant women who were at risk of mental health problems in mainland China.
Impacts of COVID‐19 on caregivers of childhood cancer survivors

AUTHOR(S)
Courtney E.Wimberly Wimberly; Lisa Towry; Caroline Caudill (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Pediatric Blood & Cancer

This paper aims to assess the impact of disruptions due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) on caregivers of childhood cancer survivors. A 13‐question survey containing multiple‐choice, Likert‐type, and free‐text questions on experiences, behaviors, and attitudes during the COVID‐19 outbreak was sent to childhood cancer caregivers and completed between April 13 and May 17, 2020. Ordered logistic regression was used to investigate relationships between demographics, COVID‐related experiences, and caregiver well‐being.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 68 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: care work, child care services, COVID-19 response, lockdown
A prospective study of mental health during the COVID‐19 pandemic in childhood trauma–exposed individuals: social support matters

AUTHOR(S)
Katja I. Seitz; Katja Bertsch; Sabine C. Herpertz

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Traumatic Stress
The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic and its unprecedented social restrictions may have serious mental health implications, especially in individuals who have experienced childhood traumatic experiences (CTEs). This prospective study aimed to investigate whether general psychopathology and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity increased during the pandemic as compared to prepandemic baseline data collected approximately 1 year earlier.
The quality of life of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents during the Coronavirus disease 19 emergency in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Riyo Ueda; Takashi Okada; Yosuke Kita (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Scientific Reports
This study aimed to reveal how the COVID-19 stay-at-home period has afected the quality of life (QOL) of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents and to identify possible factors that enabled them to maintain their QOL. We enrolled 136 school-aged children (intellectual quotient ≥ 50) and their parents and administered QOL questionnaires to assess the maladaptive behavior of the children; depression, anxiety, and stress of the parents; and activities of their daily lives.
Treatment of eating disorders in adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: a case series

AUTHOR(S)
Yaffa Serur; Marit Joffe-Milstein; Itai Pessach

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Eating Disorders

Eating disorders (EDs) are among the most difficult psychiatric disorders to treat in normal conditions. They are likely even more difficult to manage in at-risk conditions such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently there is limited evidence about the particular needs and recommended treatment of adolescents with EDs during the COVID-19 outbreak, in particular regarding the use of telemedicine and the involvement of the family in long distance-treatment. We sought to discuss the advantages and problems associated with the use of multi-professional long-distance telemedicine treatment in the management of adolescents with EDs and their families during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The impact of positive youth development attributes on posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among Chinese adolescents under COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel T. L. Shek; Li Zhao; Diya Dou (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: The Journal of adolescent health
This study examined the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among adolescents in mainland China under COVID-19. The direct effects of the perceived threat of COVID-19 and positive youth development (PYD) qualities, as well as the moderating effect of PYD qualities on PTSD symptoms, were studied.
Physical and emotional sibling violence in the time of COVID -19

AUTHOR(S)
Nathan H. Perkins; Abha Rai; Susan F. Grossman

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Family Violence
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted families in a variety of ways with much being written on the potential impact of sheltering in place and quarantining on intimate partner violence and parent-to-child abuse. One area that has received scant attention is that of physical and emotional sibling violence. While physical and emotional sibling violence is a predominant form of family violence, discussion of violence between siblings in the time of COVID-19 has not received the attention it warrants. This article examines the potential for family stress to place siblings at risk for engaging in physical and emotional sibling violence and how this is exacerbated in the time of COVID-19. Also discussed is the the connection between physical and emotional sibling violence and other forms of family violence including intimate partner violence and parent-to-child abuse and neglect which underwrites the need to place physical and emotional sibling violence on the radar of practitioners, policy makers, and researchers. Finally, implications for practice, policy, and research on physical and emotional sibling violence in the context of COVID-19 are discussed.
Changes in sleep patterns and disturbances in children and adolescents in Italy during the Covid-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Oliviero Bruni; Emanuela Malorgio; Mattia Doria (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Sleep Medicine
Participants completed an anonymous online survey, shared via social media and targeting children and adolescents aged 1–18 years, subdivided into age groups: 1–3, 4–5, 6–12, and 13–18 years. Caregivers completed a modified version of the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC), along with demographic information. This study demonstrates that confinement due to COVID-19 determined a big delay in sleep/wake schedule of children in all age groups as well as an increase of sleep disturbances in all groups but adolescents.
Transformative learning in early-career child and adolescent psychiatry in the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sowmyashree Mayur Kaku; Ana Moscoso; Jordan Sibeoni (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: The Lancet Psychiatry
The COVID-19 pandemic has globally affected the practice of child and adolescent psychiatry, as well as the daily lives of early-career child and adolescent psychiatrists. There have been changes in continuity of care (eg, postponed, cancelled, or online consultations, and few functioning inpatient units, with others becoming COVID-19 units) and the usual work frame (eg, facemasks, physical distancing, and not offering toys). Work shifted to creating standard operating procedures for care with safety precautions; disseminating advice and information about mental health; offering mental health support to frontline workers; and helping with duties outside of child and adolescent psychiatry. As early-career clinicians in child and adolescent psychiatry, we feared potential problems, such as increased risk of child abuse, domestic violence; behavioural crisis or suicide in adolescents who rely mostly on peer support and their social life; diagnostic delays (eg, for neurodevelopmental disorders); and parental burn-out (as the only caregivers). The fear of infection reduced emergency visits, but probably made these at-risk families inaccessible to clinicians.
Refugee children and families during the COVID-19 crisis: a resilience framework for mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Dillon Thomas Browne; Jackson Andrew Smith; Jean de Dieu Basabose

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Refugee Studies
Children and families are undergoing unprecedented stress as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, in part, due to the disruption of daily life arising from mandated social distancing protocols. As such, the purpose of the present report is to raise awareness surrounding resilience-challenging and resilience-promoting factors for refugee children and families during the COVID-19 crisis. Issues surrounding family life, parenting, and potential for family conflict are described. Also, cultural and linguistic factors are discussed, which may limit access to information about the pandemic and, accordingly, uptake of public health recommendations.
The impact of COVID-19 on the adaptive functioning, behavioral problems, and repetitive behaviors of Italian children with autism spectrum disorder: an observational study

AUTHOR(S)
Martina Siracusano; Eugenia Segatori; Assia Riccioni

Published: February 2021   Journal: Children
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families have represented a fragile population on which the extreme circumstances of the COVID-19 outbreak may have doubly impaired. Interruption of therapeutical interventions delivered in-person and routine disruption constituted some of the main challenges they had to face. This study investigated the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on adaptive functioning, behavioral problems, and repetitive behaviors of children with ASD.
Assessing the impact of changes in household socioeconomic status on the health of children and adolescents: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Alexander Ryan Levesque; Sarah MacDonald; · Selinda Adelle Berg (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Adolescent Research Review
Understanding how child and adolescent health is influenced by fluctuations in socioeconomic status has important public health and policy implications, as children are often subjected to both micro and macro-level socioeconomic events. This study provides the first systematic review to date on the relationship between changes in household or parental socioeconomic status and subsequent child and adolescent health outcomes.
Psychiatric morbidity and dietary habits during COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study among Egyptian youth (14–24 years)

AUTHOR(S)
Roa Gamal Alamrawy; Noha Fadl; Asmaa Khaled

Published: February 2021   Journal: Middle East Current Psychiatry volume
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is influencing all segments of society, including youth. Although the physical complaints in the time of COVID-19 are broadly-studied, a paucity of research targeted psychological ones on the precious youth population. This study aimed to describe the real-time state of Egyptian youth’s psychiatric morbidity, dietary changes, and coping methods during this pandemic and explore probable factors influencing them. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using an online survey among 447 Egyptian participants aged 14–24 years. Sociodemographic data, dietary habits, and coping methods during COVID19 were collected. The Arabic versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) were used to assess depression, anxiety and insomnia, respectively.
Psychological impact and social support in pregnant women during lockdown due to SARS‐CoV2 pandemic: a cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Maia Brik; Miguel Angel Sandonis; Sara Fernández (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Anxiety and depression during pregnancy can lead to adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. The SARS CoV‐2 pandemic, and the complete lockdown required during the first wave in most countries are stressors for pregnant women and can lead to anxiety and depression during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to explore depression and anxiety symptoms, and social support in pregnant women during the SARS CoV‐2 lockdown, as well as to explore demographic risk factors.
1066 - 1080 of 1420

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.