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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 654
An examination of bedtime media and excessive screen time by Canadian preschoolers during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
C. Fitzpatrick; M. L. Almeida; E. Harvey (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: BMC Pediatrics

Risky media use in terms of accumulating too much time in front of screens and usage before bedtime in early childhood is linked to developmental delays, reduced sleep quality, and unhealthy media use in later childhood and adulthood. For this reason, this study examines patterns of media use in pre-school children and the extent to which child and family characteristics contribute to media use during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study of digital media use by Canadian preschool-aged children (mean age = 3.45, N = 316) was conducted at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic between April and August of 2020. Parents completed a questionnaire and 24-h recall diary in the context of an ongoing study of child digital media.


Psychological symptom progression in school-aged children after COVID-19 home confinement: a longitudinal study

AUTHOR(S)
Xinyan Xie; Qi Liu; Kaiheng Zhu (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychiatry

The long-term mental health effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children are rarely reported. This study aimed to investigate the progression of depressive and anxiety symptoms among a cohort of children in the initial epicenter of COVID-19 in China. Two waves of surveys were conducted in the same two primary schools in Wuhan and Huangshi, Hubei province: Wave 1 from 28 February to 5 March, 2020 (children had been confined to home for 30–40 days) and Wave 2 from 27 November to 9 December, 2020 (schools had reopened for nearly 3 months). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were estimated using the Children's Depression Inventory – Short Form (CDI-S) and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), respectively. ΔCDI-S and ΔSCARED scores between Wave 2 and Wave 1 were calculated and further categorized into tertiles. Multivariable linear regression and multinomial logistic regression models were then applied.

Parental stress of children with autism spectrum disorder during the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19): experience from Serbia.

AUTHOR(S)
Aleksandra Djuric-Zdravkovic; Mirjana Japundza-Milisavljevic; Dijana Perovic (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Fortschritte der Neurologie · Psychiatrie
Taking care of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as of children with other developmental disorders, is associated with greater parental stress. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and impact of integrative and co-morbid ASD-related symptoms on parental stress levels during the COVID-19 pandemic at four time points. Testing was performed during significant changes related to the state of the COVID-19 pandemic in Serbia.
Depressive symptoms among children and adolescents in China during the Coronavirus disease-19 epidemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Jianghe Chen; Kun Yang; Yujia Cao (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychiatry

The Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacts mental health. Some published studies have investigated the prevalence of depression among children and adolescents in China during the pandemic. However, the results vary widely. This study aimed to systematically analyze and estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and attempted to reveal the reasons for prevalence variety in previous studies. Published studies were searched in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central, the Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP Database), China National Knowledge database (CNKI), and the WanFang database from December 2019 to May 2021. The quality of all included studies was assessed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) checklist and the American Agency for Health Care Quality and Research’s (AHRQ) cross-sectional study quality evaluation items. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects modeling.

What will the coronavirus do to our kids? Parents in Austria dealing with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on their children

AUTHOR(S)
Ulrike Zartler; Vera Dafert; Petra Dirnberger (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Research
This study investigates parents' experiences in dealing with the potential negative effects of the pandemic on their offspring, and seeks to explicate (1) how parents have assessed their children's situations during the pandemic; (2) what challenges parents have experienced in accompanying their offspring through the crisis; and (3) what strategies parents have developed for helping their children cope with the effects of the pandemic.
Children’s well-being and intra-household family relationships during the first COVID-19 lockdown in France

AUTHOR(S)
Ariane Pailhé; Lidia Panico; Anne Solaz

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Research

This article explores the consequences of the first COVID-19 lockdown in the spring of 2020 in France on intra-family relationships and 9-year-old children's socio-emotional well-being. On 17th March 2020, France began a strict lockdown to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, with school closures and limited outings permitted until early June. All family routines and work-life arrangements were impacted. A major concern relates to how these measures impacted family and child well-being.

Examination of PTSD and depression levels and demographic data of Syrian refugee children during the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Elif Erol; Dilara Demirpençe Seçinti

Published: April 2022   Journal: Psych
Background: The worldwide population of child refugees is estimated to be over 10 million. Refugee children and adolescents are among the most vulnerable groups in the world, and the pandemic created new challenges for them. Objective: This study aimed to examine the PTSD and depression levels of Syrian refugee children and adolescents, the difficulties they experienced in access to food and education, and the changes in their family income, and evaluate the effects of these factors on symptom severities of depression and PTSD. It used data obtained from 631 Syrian refugee children between the ages of 7 and 15. Assessment measures for exposure to PTSD and depression included a socio-demographic form, stressors related to COVID-19, the Child and Adolescent Trauma Survey (CATS), and the patient-rated Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI). ANCOVA is conducted to evaluate the differences between the symptoms of PTSD and depression. The regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the scales and the demographic data.
The association between screen time and attention in children: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Renata Maria Silva Santos; Camila Guimarães Mendes; Débora Marques (et al.)

Published: April 2022
Electronic media pervade modern life. Childhood is a crucial period for attentional development and the screen exposure time is increasing. This review aimed to understand the association between screen time and attention of children with typical development. A systematic review was conducted in compliance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyzes PRISMA being registered at Prospero under number CRD42021228721. A search was performed in January 2021 with the following keywords: “screen time,” “children,” and “attention,” combined with the operator AND, on databases PubMed, and PsycINFO. Four hundred and ninety-eight articles were identified, and 41 papers were fully read, of which 11 were included in this review.
Food insecurity and mental well-being among low-income families during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jiying Ling; Paige Duren; Lorraine B. Robbins (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: U.S. flagAn official website of the United States government Here's how you know NIH NLM LogoLog in Access keysNCBI HomepageMyNCBI HomepageMain ContentMain Navigation NLM Catalog Search database NLM Catalog Search term "Am J Health Promot"[Title Abbrevia

This paper aimed to examine the interaction effects of adult and child food insecurity on parents’ and children’s mental well-being. An online survey study was conducted. Four hundred and eight parents under poverty level and having a child aged 3–5 years participated. Food insecurity was assessed by the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module. Parents’ stress, anxiety and depression; and children’s sadness, fear, anger, and positive affect were measured using instruments from HealthMeasures.


One school’s management of students with intellectual disabilities during the COVID-19 outbreak in Japan: a study based on interviews with teachers

AUTHOR(S)
Yusuke Kusumi; Mitsuaki Tominaga; Hironobu Nagasawa (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of intellectual disabilities : JOID
This study aimed to elucidate how school employees caring for students with intellectual disabilities managed emergencies caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. It attended to decision-making by school managers as well as the engagement of local teachers in the outcome resolution process. A total of 10 teachers employed in different positions were purposefully selected from a school for students with intellectual disabilities in Osaka, Japan, and interviews were conducted with them via Zoom. The thematic analysis identified six significant premises: sensemaking, emergency responsive organization, high morale, planning through prioritization, risk management, and recovery from adverse incidents. The findings suggest distributed leadership functions to successfully sustain security in educational practices. Additionally, the empirical study consisting of interviews with staff in multiple positions reveals that all of the staff's proactive participation in decision-making and the communication process enabled the school to cope with the pandemic crisis as a united organization.
Mental health symptoms in children and adolescents during COVID-19 in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Gemma Sicouri; Sonja Marc; Elizabeth Pellicano (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry

COVID-19 has led to disruptions to the lives of Australian families through social distancing, school closures, a temporary move to home-based online learning, and effective lockdown. Understanding the effects on child and adolescent mental health is important to inform policies to support communities as they continue to face the pandemic and future crises. This paper sought to report on mental health symptoms in Australian children and adolescents during the initial stages of the pandemic (May to November 2020) and to examine their association with child/family characteristics and exposure to the broad COVID-19 environment. An online baseline survey was completed by 1327 parents and carers of Australian children aged 4 to 17 years. Parents/carers reported on their child’s mental health using five measures, including emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity/inattention, anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. Child/family characteristics and COVID-related variables were measured.

Supporting children on the autism spectrum as they experience the challenges of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Obst; Megan Roesler; Patricia Fato (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: NASN school nurse
The response to the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified stress and social isolation for many children, but those children living with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been disproportionately affected. Prior to the pandemic, children with ASD often faced social isolation due to struggles with their social communication and social development. Planning for children with ASD to return to community experiences, including school, appointments, and even recreational activities, will require an understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on the child and their family. As the child and family are working to adjust to changes like new routines, sleep patterns, and sensory issues as a result of the pandemic, the pediatric nursing community should be knowledgeable and prepared to develop creative opportunities to meet the needs of this vulnerable population.
The impact of death and dying education for undergraduate students during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Robert S. Weisskirch; Kimberly A. Crossman

Published: April 2022   Journal: OMEGA - Journal of Death and Dying
Fear of COVID-19 may make the imminence of death prescient for undergraduate students, increasing death anxiety and worsening mental health. Formal death education may provide benefits such as reduced fear of COVID-19 and death anxiety, and improved mental health. In this study, 86 undergraduate students completed a pre- and post-semester online questionnaire on fear of COVID-19, death anxiety, and mental health outcomes. Findings indicate indirect effects of death anxiety on fear of COVID-19 to anxiety. Moreover, fear of COVID-19, individual concerns about death, and death anxiety were reduced over the semester for undergraduate students in formal death education.
Did children in single-parent households have a higher probability of emotional instability during the COVID-19 pandemic? A nationwide cross-sectional study in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Takuto Naito; Yasutake Tomata; Tatsui Otsuka (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The influence of public health measures against COVID-19 in Japan on child mental health by household type is unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether COVID-19 and the declaration of a state of emergency in Japan affected children’s mental health between single-parent and two-parent households disproportionately. A large cross-sectional online survey was conducted from August to September 2020. The study included 3365 parents with children aged 0–14 years old who reported their children’s mental status during the declared state of emergency. Emotional instability was reported dichotomously by parents. As the primary result, the probability of emotional instability was higher in single-parent households compared with that in two-parent households after adjustments for potential covariates; the adjusted prevalence ratio (95% CI) was 1.26 (1.07–1.49).
Family resilience during COVID-19 pandemic: a literature review

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Gayatri; Dian Kristiani Irawaty

Published: April 2022   Journal: The Family Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic has spread rapidly in many countries. This pandemic has led to short-term as well as long-term psychosocial and mental health implications for all family members. The magnitude of family resilience is determined by many vulnerability factors like developmental age, educational status, preexisting mental health condition, being economically underprivileged or being quarantined due to infection or fear of infection. PubMed, SCOPUS, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane, and ProQuest were searched from the inception of the pandemic to December 31, 2020. Articles were screened for inclusion by Authors.
1 - 15 of 654

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.