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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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151 - 165 of 182
Brazilian child protection professionals' resilient behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sidnei Rinaldo Priolo Filho; Deborah Goldfarb; Murilo R. Zibetti

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Within the unique and understudied context of a developing economy facing the strain of an international pandemic, this study sought to expand our theoretical understanding of the individual and socio-ecological predictors of whether child protective services professionals engage in resilient behaviors. Child protection professionals' resilience must be fostered by socio-ecological contexts, such as their workplace and employers, and additional supports are needed during the trying times of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Child protection and resilience in the face of COVID-19 in South Africa: a rapid review of C-19 legislation

AUTHOR(S)
Ansie Fouché; Daniël F. Fouché; Linda C. Theron Simba

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
In response to the COVID-19 (C-19) pandemic, the South African government instituted strict lockdown and related legislation. Although this response was well intended, many believed it advanced children’s vulnerability to abuse and neglect. This article interrogates these concerns. It investigates how C-19 legislation enabled, or constrained, South African children’s protection from abuse and neglect and appraises the findings from a social-ecological resilience perspective with the aim of advancing child protection in times of emergency.
Child welfare and COVID-19: an unexpected opportunity for systemic change

AUTHOR(S)
Jane M. Spinak

Published: September 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has already wrecked greater havoc in poor neighborhoods of color, where pre-existing conditions exacerbate the disease’s spread. Crowded housing and homelessness, less access to health care and insurance, and underlying health conditions are all factors that worsen the chances of remaining healthy.Workers desperate for income continue to work without sufficient protective measures, moving in and out of these neighborhoods, putting themselves and their families at risk. During periods of greater disruption, tensions are heightened and violence more prevalent. Already some experts are warning of an onslaught of child maltreatment cases, citing earlier examples of spikes in foster care during drug epidemics and economic recessions. Instead of panicking, thinking creatively and thoughtfully about appropriate responses and using the information and resources we already have may help to diminish such fears and improve the safeguards that are needed to protect the integrity of families and keep children safe.

Child abuse and neglect prevention by public health nurses during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Chikako Honda; Kyoko Yoshioka‐Maeda; Riho Iwasaki‐Motegi (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Child abuse and neglect are high‐priority public health issues around the world, but it is known that early care for families with parenting anxiety and stress is essential for preventing abuse (World Health Organization, 2006). In Japan, the country has created a national campaign plan called The Second Term of Healthy Parents and Children 21 (2015‐2024) to address two prioritized agenda: (1) supporting parents with difficulties raising their children; and (2) preventing child abuse from pregnancy. Public health nurses (PHNs) play a crucial role in preventing child abuse and neglect by providing family healthcare in each municipality. In Japan, more than 70% of PHNs work for municipalities or prefectures covering people at various health stages from birth to old age, identifying health issues for infants and their parents before preschool through a variety of health checkups and home visits.
La juventud opina sobre violencia durante la pandemia de la COVID-19 (U-Report)
Published: August 2020

Results of a survey recently carried out by UNICEF show that thousands of young people in Latin America and the Caribbean believe that tensions at home have increased because of COVID-19. Opinions were collected through U-Report, UNICEF's secure, free and confidential mobile empowerment platform that gives young people a voice on the big issues that affect them.

Youth speak up about violence during COVID-19 (U-Report)
Published: August 2020

Results of a survey recently carried out by UNICEF show that thousands of young people in Latin America and the Caribbean believe that tensions at home have increased because of COVID-19. Opinions were collected through U-Report, UNICEF's secure, free and confidential mobile empowerment platform that gives young people a voice on the big issues that affect them.

The COVID‐19 pandemic and its impact on children in domestic violence refuges (Norway)

AUTHOR(S)
Carolina Øverlien

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

The COVID‐19 pandemic has resulted in negative consequences for children exposed to violence and abuse. Domestic violence refuge staff were greatly concerned about children both living outside and inside refuges. Domestic violence refuges have played a pivotal role during the COVID‐19 pandemic and should receive wider acknowledgement and greater support for their work.

Telemental health for child trauma treatment during and post-COVID-19: limitations and considerations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Racine; Cailey Hartwick; Delphine Collin-V´ezina (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented disruptions and stress in the lives of children and families internationally. Heightened family stress and turmoil can increase risk for, and exacerbate, child maltreatment. As a result, child maltreatment experts are concerned that there will be an influx of children requiring trauma assessment and treatment during and after COVID-19. As physical distancing measures have been implemented and will likely persist into 2021, organizations providing trauma treatment to children and their families have had to rapidly pivot to telemental health to maintain service delivery with clients. While the benefits of telemental health have been identified, including reduced barriers to access, increased cost effectiveness, and broad availability of services, there are unique limitations to its implementation within a child maltreatment population, such as challenges with attention and emotion regulation skills, difficulties identifying dissociative symptoms, and increased time with perpetrators of abuse due to shelter in place orders. These limitations are exacerbated for children and families who are most marginalized and facing the highest levels of social and economic barriers. Lack of access to reliable technology, lack of a private or confidential space for sessions, and reluctance to process trauma in the absence of a safe environment, are all barriers to conducting effective trauma treatment over telemental health. This article discusses both the benefits and barriers to telemental health in a child maltreatment population and offers considerations for child trauma service provision, program development, and policy during and post the COVID-19 pandemic.
Assessment of child wellbeing during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Bishnu B. Khatri

Institution: World Vision, Consortium Nepal
Published: August 2020
While children so far have not faced direct health effects of COVID-19- the crisis is having a profound effect on their wellbeing. During the lockdown, children are more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation while their schooling is seriously disturbed. Therefore, with the objective to collect, analyze and disseminate authentic information on the situation of children in Nepal during the pandemic, Consortium Nepal conducted a research titled ‘Assessment of Child Wellbeing during COVID-19’. This assessment is accompanied by collecting responses of children, parents and local government representatives/officials from selected districts across Nepal. For the purpose, separate questionnaires were developed for all these stakeholders. Being a descriptive study, questions were developed so as to collect qualitative data as per the need and availability.
Family‎ violence‎ and‎ its ‎impact‎ on‎ children’s ‎mental‎ health during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Zinab M. Shokair; Eid G. Abo Hamza

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of Instructional Technology and Educational Studies
This research aims to identify the types and prevalence rates of family violence against children during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. It also aims to identify the mental health problems those child victims of family violence develop, and the differences between children who experience high and low family violence rates.
Ascending child sexual abuse statistics in India during COVID-19 lockdown: a darker reality and alarming mental health concerns

AUTHOR(S)
Shuvabrata Poddar; Urbi Mukherjee

Published: August 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine
This short commentary is about the need for proper circulation of information and services for protection of children from violence, abuse, and neglect during COVID-19 in India.
The impact of COVID-19 on migrant children in Trinidad and Tobago
Institution: *UNICEF, USAID
Published: August 2020
This analysis focuses on the following COVID-19-related impacts that could affect the well-being of children: disruption to education, rising unemployment, mental health and safety, and risks to nutrition.
Suffering in silence: how COVID-19 school closures inhibit the reporting of child maltreatment

AUTHOR(S)
E. Jason Baron; Ezra G. Goldstein; Cullen T. Wallace

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Public Economics
This study examines an unexplored consequence of COVID-19 school closures: the broken link between child maltreatment victims and the number one source of reported maltreatment allegations---school personnel.
The COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on children in domestic violence refuges

AUTHOR(S)
Carolina Øverlien

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

The COVID‐19 pandemic has resulted in negative consequences for children exposed to violence and abuse. Domestic violence refuge staff were greatly concerned about children both living outside and inside refuges. Domestic violence refuges have played a pivotal role during the COVID‐19 pandemic and should receive wider acknowledgement and greater support for their work.

Vulnerability of children in Botswana during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Thabile A. Samboma

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Social Work
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Botswana is at a time of economic uncertainty which is linked to increased child sexual abuse. Although Botswana is among the least hit by COVID-19 in Africa, evidence from Botswana police suggests that the government’s move to apply strict measures such as lockdown, extreme social distancing and movement restriction has led to an increase in the number of child sexual abuse cases in Botswana. Evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on children needs urgent attention.
151 - 165 of 182

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.