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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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46 - 60 of 207
Telemedicine in the COVID-19 era: taking care of children with obesity and diabetes mellitus

AUTHOR(S)
Giuseppina Rosaria Umano; Anna Di Sessa; Stefano Guarino (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: World Journal of Diabetes
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection was declared a pandemic in January 2020. Since then, several measures to limit virus transmission have been imposed; among them, home confinement has been the most severe, with drastic changes in the daily routines of the general population. The “stay at home” rule has impaired healthcare service access, and patients with chronic conditions were the most exposed to the negative effects of this limitation. There is strong evidence of the worsening of obesity and diabetes mellitus in children during this period. To overcome these issues, healthcare providers have changed their clinical practice to ensure follow-up visits and medical consultation though the use of telemedicine. Telemedicine, including telephone calls, videocalls, data platforms of shared telemedicine data platforms mitigated the negative effect of pandemic restrictions. Published evidence has documented good metabolic control and weight management outcomes in centers that performed extensive telemedicine services last year during the pandemic. This review discusses studies that investigated the use of telemedicine tools for the management of pediatric obesity and diabetes.
Could COVID-19 reverse the modest gains made in newborn health in Ethiopia?

AUTHOR(S)
Abiy Seifu Estifanos; Kescha Kazmi; Shaun K. Morris

Published: May 2021   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal

Ethiopia has made remarkable progress in reducing childhood and neonatal mortality in the last two decades. However, with the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ethiopia, disruptions in routine health care pose a significant risk in reversing the gains made in neonatal mortality reduction. Using the World Health Organization’s health systems building blocks framework we examined the mechanisms by which the pandemic may impact neonatal health.

Trends in geographic and temporal distribution of US children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ermias D. Belay; Joseph Abrams; Matthew E. Oster (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics

Multiple inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) occurs in association with the COVID-19 pandemic. To describe the clinical characteristics and geographic and temporal distribution of the largest cohort of patients with MIS-C in the United States to date. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted on clinical and laboratory data collected from patients with MIS-C. The analysis included patients with illness onset from March 2020 to January 2021 and met MIS-C case definition.

What happened to the prevention of child maltreatment during COVID-19? A yearlong into the pandemic reflection

AUTHOR(S)
Carmit Katz

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal on Child Maltreatment: Research, Policy and Practice

In March 2020, when COVID-19 was acknowledged as a worldwide pandemic, many countries dedicated their efforts to mitigate the virus and its negative health outcomes. One of the most frequent solutions was forced lockdowns, which was found to be beneficial in decreasing the spread of the virus. Today, after a year of international efforts to diminish the virus, we are at a stage where we can see the impact of these measures on children during COVID-19. Specifically, we now need to reflect on what happened to the prevention of child maltreatment (CM) during this time.There is an accumulation of knowledge with respect to the dramatic decrease of CM reports to formal systems worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, researchers have been stressing that this decrease should not be attributed to an increase in the safety of children but rather due to the adverse impact of the lockdown on the system’s ability to see and protect children (e.g., Baron et al., 2020; Katz & Cohen, 2020). In addition, there is growing evidence that during COVID-19, various CM risk factors significantly increased (Conrad-Hiebner & Byram, 2020; Proulx et al., 2021; Rodriguez et al., 2020; Wu & Xu, 2020), such as parental job loss (Lawson et al., 2020), parental social isolation (Lee et al., 2021), and mental health issues (Russell et al., 2020). Adding to this, parental stress was found to be a major CM risk factor that increased during COVID-19 and an increase in self-reported child abuse was found for parents experiencing heightened stressors (Lawson et al., 2020).

Impact of COVID-19 on early childhood educator’s perspectives and practices in nutrition and physical activity: a qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Lynne Lafave; Alexis D. Webster; Ceilidh McConnell

Published: April 2021   Journal: Early Childhood Education Journal
Government guidelines for relaunching early childhood education and care (ECEC) programs during the COVID-19 pandemic have required the implementation of various practices to minimize the risk of infection transmission. These directives include recommendations regarding serving and handling food, shared spaces, and physical distancing which have a direct impact on the health and development of children in care. The purpose of this study was to explore early childhood educators’ perspectives on how COVID-19 guidelines have impacted the nutrition and physical activity practices within their ECEC environment. A qualitative description approach was used to explore a purposive sample of 17 educators working full time in ECEC centres during the pandemic between July and August 2020.
Comparison of clinical features on admission between coronavirus disease 2019 and influenza a among children: a retrospective study in China

AUTHOR(S)
Feng Liang; Xianfeng Wang; Jianbo Shao (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: BMC Infectious Diseases

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) share similar symptoms with influenza A (IA), but it is more worthwhile to understand the disparities of the two infections regarding their clinical characteristics on admission. A total of 71 age-matched pediatric IA and COVID-19 patient pairs were formed and their clinical data on admission were compared.

Child maltreatment reports and Child Protection Service responses during COVID-19: Knowledge exchange among Australia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Germany, Israel, and South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Ilan Katz; Carmit Katz; Sabine Andresen (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

COVID-19 has become a worldwide pandemic impacting child protection services (CPSs) in many countries. With quarantine and social distancing restrictions, school closures, and recreational venues suspended or providing reduced access, the social safety net for violence prevention has been disrupted significantly. Impacts include the concerns of underreporting and increased risk of child abuse and neglect, as well as challenges in operating CPSs and keeping their workforce safe. The current discussion paper explored the impact of COVID-19 on child maltreatment reports and CPS responses by comparing countries using available population data.

Speech-language teletherapy services for school-aged children in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sherine R. Tambyraja; Kelly Farquharson; Jaumeiko Coleman

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk
The purpose of this study was to examine how school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) maintained clinical services via teletherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic closures. School-based SLPs in the United States were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Questions relevant to this study gathered information regarding a) provision of teletherapy following COVID-19 school closures, b) the types of technologies used to deliver teletherapy and supports offered from school districts, and c) challenges to providing consistent therapy.
Speech pathology telepractice intervention during the COVID-19 pandemic for Spanish-speaking children with cleft palate: A systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Mirta Palomares-Aguilera; Felipe Inostroza-Allende; Loreley Riquelme Solar

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Due to the lockdown and quarantines caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the need to study and use telepractice for providing speech pathology interventions for children with cleft palate has arisen. This paper aims to carry out a systematic review of the use of telepractice during the COVID-19 pandemic for providing speech pathology interventions for Spanish-speaking children with cleft palate.
Child care and COVID-19: support children by investing in early educators and program sustainability

AUTHOR(S)
Rebekah Levine Coley; Kathryn Tout

Institution: Society for Research in Child Development
Published: March 2021
The COVID-19 pandemic exposed the longstanding vulnerability of early care and education programs and inequities in the health and financial security of early educators. Addressing new and ongoing needs in the early care and education system (including schools, centers, and homes) is critical to supporting the well-being of children who rely on child care. Prior to March 2020, over 7.75 million children under 6 were cared for in regulated child care programs by one million early educators in center-based programs and one million paid home-based early educators.1 While deemed an essential service, child care programs suffered volatile impacts of the pandemic without the support and existing infrastructure available to other businesses. Policy strategies for recovery and rebuilding must address the short- and long-term needs of child care programs and the early educators who work in them. Attention is needed to address disparities in the experiences of early educators who are Black and Hispanic. Actions to support programs and the workforce can ultimately benefit children and families served in child care.
Changes in children’s surgical services during the COVID-19 pandemic at a tertiary-level government hospital in a lower middle-income country

AUTHOR(S)
Md. Abdullah Al Farooq; S M Humayun Kabir; Tanvir Kabir Chowdhury (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The aim of this study was to quantify the changes that occurred in the surgical services of children during the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of a low/middle-income country. Design A case–control study was conducted at a large referral centre in Bangladesh among patients aged ≤12 years. Comparisons were made between cases admitted during a period of ‘April to September 2020’ (Pandemic period) and controls during a similar period in 2019 (Reference period). The number of admissions and outpatient department (OPD) attendances, age and sex distribution, diagnosis, number and types of surgeries performed (elective vs emergency), variations in treatment of acute appendicitis, types of anaesthesia and mortality were compared
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, hospitalization, low-income countries | Countries: Bangladesh
Model-based projections for COVID-19 outbreak size and student-days lost to closure in Ontario childcare centres and primary schools

AUTHOR(S)
Brendon Phillips; Dillon T. Browne; Madhur Anand (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Scientific Reports volume
There is a pressing need for evidence-based scrutiny of plans to re-open childcare centres during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study developed an agent-based model of SARS-CoV-2 transmission within a childcare centre and households. Scenarios varied the student-to-educator ratio (15:2, 8:2, 7:3), family clustering (siblings together versus random assignment) and time spent in class.
Childhood in the time of COVID-19
Institution: Save the Children
Published: March 2021
A generation of children in America are experiencing multiple hardships brought on by the coronavirus. Many millions more children are now hungry, missing out on school, and worried about their family’s economic future. For children who were struggling before COVID-19, things have gotten worse.
Impact of outpatient SARS-CoV-2 infections in minority children

AUTHOR(S)
Vanessa Denny; Niva Shah; Karolina Petro (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Medicine
Data regarding COVID-19 in the adult population and hospitalized children is rapidly evolving, but little is known about children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 who do not require hospitalization. This observational, retrospective study analyzed risk factors, demographics and clinical course of non-hospitalized patients  21 years of age with COVID-19 infection.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 100 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: 3 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19, hospitalization, infectious disease
Crisis brings innovative strategies: collaborative empathic teleintervention for children with disabilities during the COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Verónica Schiariti; Robin A. McWilliam

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
While coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to spread across the globe, public health strategies—including the social distancing measures that many countries have implemented— have caused disruptions to daily routines. For children with disabilities and their families, such measures mean a lack of access to the resources they usually have through schools and habilitation or rehabilitation services. Health emergencies, like the current COVID-19 pandemic, require innovative strategies to ensure continuity of care. The objective of this perspective paper is to propose the adoption of two innovative strategies for teleintervention.
46 - 60 of 207

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.