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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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211 - 225 of 282
Coming together for refugee education
Institution: UNHCR - United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
Published: September 2020
This report, the fifth annual education report from UNHCR, predicts that unless the international community takes immediate and bold steps against the catastrophic effects of COVID-19 on refugee education, the potential of millions of young refugees living in some of the world’s most vulnerable communities will be further threatened. It is based on 2019 data from twelve countries hosting more than half of the world’s refugee children.
Moving towards children as partners in child protection in COVID-19 guide: from participation to partnerships

AUTHOR(S)
Vanessa Currie; Laura H.V. Wright; Helen Veitch (et al.)

Published: September 2020
At the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, children and youth were facing unprecedented challenges caused by quarantine measures and school closure policies in nearly every country in the world. At the same time these challenges emerged, child-focused organizations found it harder than ever to communicate with children, needing to adapt their methods of hearing children’s voices and ensuring children’s participation to virtual and physically distanced realities. These adaptations are seemingly harder for adults and their organizations than for children, who are creative, innovative, and tech-savvy. Despite the COVID-19 challenges, children around the world have found meaningful ways to s upport and protect their peers, families, and communities. Children are on the frontlines of innovative responses and are working closely with their adult allies. The leadership demonstrated through these child-adult partnerships is the underlying inspiration for this guide.
Considerations for school-related public health measures in the context of COVID-19
Institution: *UNICEF, UNESCO, WHO - World Health Organization
Published: September 2020

This Annex is intended to help policy makers and educators with making decisions on running schools as safely as possible during the COVID-19 pandemic. At the forefront of all considerations and decisions should be the continuity of education for children for their  overall  well-being,  health  and  safety.  Nonetheless,  all  decisions  will  have  implications  for  children,  parents  or  caregivers,  teachers and other staff and more broadly, their communities and societies. This document was developed with input from the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of Experts on Educational Institutions and COVID-19 and experts from WHO, UNICEF, and UNESCO, who jointly reviewed the latest evidence to develop this interim guidance, which considers equity, resource implications, and feasibility.

Modeling reading ability gain in kindergarten children during COVID-19 school closures

AUTHOR(S)
Xue Bao; Hang Qu; Ruixiong Zhang

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
By 15 April 2020, more than 1.5 billion students worldwide experienced school closures in an effort to slow the spread of a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), during the worldwide coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. These interruptions in formal in-person educational experiences caused adverse consequences on school-age children’s academic outcomes. Using a pre-existing database, this paper calculates changes in children’s reading ability without formal education (i.e., the summer months).
Global education monitoring report, 2020, Latin America and the Caribbean: inclusion and education: all means all
Institution: UNESCO - Global Education Monitoring Report Team, SUMMA
Published: September 2020
This report drives home where change is most needed. If diversity and identity are inbuilt areas of study in most countries’ curricula, the report shows that not all groups are represented and the challenge of teaching children in their home language has yet to be effectively addressed. Practically all countries in the region collect data on ethnicity to guide policy decisions, but many still do not carry out household surveys to get granular data on disadvantage. The region has the highest share of teachers already trained on inclusion, but many are still trying to address inequality and cope with migratory impact without the pedagogies required. A particular case is made for tackling school segregation based on socio-economic and ethnic divides.
The hidden impact of COVID-19 on child education

AUTHOR(S)
Mya Gordon; Melissa Burgess; Munshi Sulaiman (et al.)

Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This report is one in a series presenting findings from the Global COVID-19 Research Study. The results presented in this study focus on implications for children’s education, drawing on data from our representative sample of 17,565 parents and caregivers and 8,069 children in our programme participants’ group. The research presents differences in impacts on and needs of children by region, age, gender, disability, minority group, indicators of poverty and more. The research was implemented in 46 countries and resulted in the largest and most comprehensive survey of children and families during the COVID-19 crisis to date, with 31,683 parents and caregivers and 13,477 children aged between 11 and 17 participating in the research.
Technology for educational purposes among low-income latino children living in a mobile park in Silicon Valley: a case study before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Claire Ji Hee Kim; Amado M. Padilla

Published: September 2020   Journal: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
This case study explores the role of technology in education among low-income Latino residents living in a mobile park in Silicon Valley. Through surveys and in-person interviews with parents and children, qualitative data on home Internet access and availability of technological devices utilized for school-related purposes are reported. The results of this study indicate that despite having a baseline level of access to technology as well as an understanding of its importance in the context of a child’s education, our study population currently faces significant barriers to having adequate access to technology at home due to socioeconomic barriers.
Analysis of learning activities for children using smart phone applications in private schools

AUTHOR(S)
Sanaullah Memon; Hidayatullah Shaikh; Qadir Bux Rind (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Science and Technology
Smart phone applications are the debatable and burning issue of different organizations during Covid-19, which is focusing on learning activities of students. This paper aims to implement the Smart phone applications towards the learning activities of both primary and secondary level education. Primary data was collected by firsthand (Primary source of information) producing the set of questions in English language consisting of two factors of variables using five point measuring scale (strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, and strongly disagree). Whereas, Secondary data has also been used for literature review that justifies our research work; in the light of numerous academic articles of various authors.
COVID-19 disease pandemic lockdown: schools closure and students e-learning options in Tanzania

AUTHOR(S)
Fabian G. Mahundu

Published: September 2020
The purpose of this paper is to explore the learning options adopted by students during the closure of schools due to the COVID-19 disease pandemic in Tanzania. It examines the way learners harness the advantage of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and the role played by parents and guardians at home in supporting their children during the COVID-19 lockdown.
Education in times of COVID-19 pandemic: academic stress and its psychosocial impact on children and adolescents in India

AUTHOR(S)
Ananya Mahapatra; Prerna Sharma

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Social Psychiatry
The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been declared by the World Health Organisation as an international public health emergency. Owing to its high infectivity, countries all over the world implemented nationwide lockdowns with the hope of flattening the epidemic curve. Around the world, this has led to the closure of schools in over 150 countries affecting the education of nearly 1 billion children. India faced total lockdown from 24th March 2020 to May 2020 and even though a phased re-opening of public services has since then been attempted, most educational institutions including schools and colleges remain closed without a clear view regarding their re-opening. This paper discusses the various psychosocial issues that have emerged leading to academic stress amongst children and adolescent students and its potential to lead to short and long-term psychological morbidity.
Supplement to framework for reopening schools: emerging lessons from country experiences in managing the process of reopening schools
Institution: UNESCO, *UNICEF, The World Bank
Published: September 2020
Education systems around the world continue to grapple with the complex decisions of when and how to reopen schools for in-person learning following widespread closures due to the COVID 19 pandemic.1 Many countries closed schools along with other widespread restrictions as an immediate response to the increased spread of COVD-19. But school closures have had increasingly clear negative impacts on child health, education and development, family income and the overall economy.
Guidance for Alternative Care Provision during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jess Edwards

Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This document provides practical guidance to actors in humanitarian and development contexts on the adaptations and considerations needed to support children who are either currently in alternative care or are going into an alternative care placement during the COVID-19 pandemic. It expands on the guidance provided in the Interagency Technical Note on Children and Alternative Care Immediate Response Measures by providing more detailed guidance for the medium and long-term response, recognising that the current pandemic and measures to address it are likely to continue over prolonged periods of time, and also to be reoccurring in phases. It should be read alongside the Technical Note: Adaptation of Child Protection Case Management to the COVID-19 Pandemic. International standards and guidelines on children’s rights and alternative car.
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Supplement to Framework for reopening schools: emerging lessons from country experiences in managing the process of reopening schools
Institution: UNESCO, *UNICEF, The World Bank, World Food Programme, UNHCHR
Published: September 2020
Education systems around the world continue to grapple with the complex decisions of when and how to reopen schools for in-person learning following widespread closures due to the COVID 19 pandemic. Experiences in most high-income countries show no measurable impact of school reopening on increasing community transmission rates, while within primary school settings in particular there has been limited transmission among children or between children and adults. Emerging evidence drawn from Eastern and Southern Africa also suggests that schools have not been associated with significant increases in community transmission. As more countries are re-opening schools, lessons are emerging on what is working. These lessons are shared in this supplement piece covering the same areas that were covered in the Framework for Re-opening Schools.
Global education monitoring report, 2020: inclusion and education: all means all
Institution: UNESCO - Global Education Monitoring Report Team
Published: September 2020
This Report identifies different forms of exclusion, how they are caused and what we can do about them. As such, it is a call to action we should heed as we seek to pave the way for more resilient and equal societies in the future. A call to collect better data, without which we cannot understand or measure the true scope ofthe problem. A call to make public policies far more inclusive, based on examples of effective policies currently in force, and by working together to address intersecting disadvantages, just as we saw Ministries and government departments are capable of when addressing Covid-19.
The effects of online homeschooling on children, parents, and teachers of grades 1-9 during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ying Zhao; Yong Guo; Yu Xiao (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Medical Science Monitor
Beginning in the 2020 spring semester, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all school-age children in China were homeschooled via live/recorded broadcasts, online group communication, and software-based homework submission. This study assessed the effects of and proper preparation for this educational approach.
211 - 225 of 282

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.