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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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271 - 285 of 301
School closure, COVID-19 and lunch programme: Unprecedented undernutrition crisis in low-middle income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Korapat Mayurasakorn; Bonggochpass Pinsawas; Pichanun Mongkolsucharitkul (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Based on the current data indicating that children are less likely to be main vectors of SAR‐CoV‐2, This article argues that the benefits of school reopening and continuing education far outweigh the risks.
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has affected nearly 70% of children and teenagers around the world due to school closure policies.
School closure is implemented widely in order to prevent viral transmission and its impact on the broader community, based on preliminary rec-
ommendations and evidence from inuenza. However, there is debate with regard to the effectiveness of school closures. Growing evidence sug-
gests that a childs SARS-CoV-2 infection is often mild or asymptomatic and that children may not be major SARS-CoV-2 transmitters; thus, it is
questionable if school closures prevent transmission signicantly. This question is important as a majority of children in low- and middle-income
countries depend on free school meals; unexpected long-term school closure may adversely impact nutrition and educational outcomes. Food
insecurity is expected to be higher during the pandemic. In this viewpoint, we argue for a more thorough exploration of potential adverse
impacts of school closures in low- and middle-income countries and recommend actions to ensure that the health and learning needs of vulnera-
ble populations are met in this time of crisis.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 56 | Issue: 7 | No. of pages: 1013-1017 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, child nutrition, child protection measures, COVID-19 response, school attendance | Countries: Thailand
The impact of COVID-19 on children in Europe
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
This paper is divided into two parts. The first details the evidence from the ground, painting the picture of life for children during the pandemic in different European countries with statistics and examples, and giving a set of recommendations on measures that national governments across Europe can take to help protect children from the worst impacts of the crisis relating to the economic impacts on families, loss of services, access to education and targeted measures for children in migration. The second part focuses on recommendations to the EU institutions on how EU policy and funding can support and complement these national-level actions in these challenging times.
"Everything has Changed": children’s reflections on the impact of COVID-19 in Afghanistan
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
Between 20-21 May, Save the Children undertook a remote scoping exercise to assess the sentiments of children aged 6-15 across seven provinces of the country. A total of 74 responses, including 32 boys and 42 girls, were collected via phone calls by Save the Children ’s Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning (MEAL) staff. The questions posed to the children were open-ended, simply asking about what they knew about COVID-19 and how it has impacted their lives and those of their families and communities. This approach was employed in order to better ensure objective responses/reflections from children.
Save our education in West and Central Africa: protect every child's right to learn in the COVID-19 response and recovery
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
In early April, an estimated 128 million children in West and Central Africa were out of school as one of the collateral consequences of governments’ response to halt the spread of the COVID 19’ virus. Over this period, some countries have been demonstrating great leadership in providing continuous learning for children while schools remained closed. This pandemic has come on top of an existing learning crisis. In this context, COVID-19 further compounds these challenges and will result in millions more children being denied their basic right to learn.The poorest and most marginalized groups are at risk of never returning to school, with children instead at risk of forced child labour and/or child marriage. The price they will pay on their future will be long lasting. This is the biggest education emergency of our lifetime
Knowledge, attitudes and impact of COVID-19 on children in non-formal schools in Dadaab
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
Kenya reported the first coronavirus case March 13th and since then the numbers have continued to increase mainly in the capital and the coastal towns of Mombasa and Kilifi but also in other parts of the country. Women and youth bear the largest impact especially because most of them are in vulnerable employment in the informal sectors, which has been hardest hit by the measures that government has proposed to try to curb the spread of the virus, and in turn, children are affected. This study seeks to understand if and how children in Dadaab continue to learn; and their level of knowledge and awareness towards COVID-19 so that appropriate measures can be taken to support them.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 17 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, impact, outbreak, pandemic | Countries: Kenya | Publisher: Save the Children
Lives upended: how COVID-19 threatens the futures of 600 million South Asian children

AUTHOR(S)
Simon Ingram

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: June 2020

The lives and futures of children across South Asia are being torn apart by the Covid-19 crisis. While they may be less susceptible to the virus itself, children are being profoundly affected by the fallout, including the economic and social consequences of the lockdown and other measures taken to counter the pandemic. Decades of progress on children’s health, education and other priorities risk being wiped out. Yet the crisis has also presented opportunities to expose and tackle some of the longstanding challenges facing children in the region, especially those from the most vulnerable communities. With the pandemic expanding rapidly across a region that contains a quarter of the world’s population, UNICEF's Lives Upended report describes the disastrous immediate and longer-term consequences that the virus and the measures to curb it have had on 600 million children and the services they depend on.

Schooling disrupted, school rethought: how the Covid-19 pandemic is changing education

AUTHOR(S)
Fernando M. Reimers; Andreas Schleicher

Published: June 2020
This report looks at how the Covid-19 pandemic is changing education and is based on a survey conducted between 25 April and 7 May 2020 that received responses from government officials, education administrators, teachers, and school administrators in 59 countries.
Simulating the potential impacts of COVID-19 school closures on schooling and learning outcomes: a set of global estimates

AUTHOR(S)
João Pedro Azevedo; Amer Hasan; Diana Goldemberg (et al.)

Institution: The World Bank
Published: June 2020
School closures due to COVID-19 have left more than a billion students out of school. This paper presents the results of simulations considering three, five and seven months of school closure and different levels of mitigation effectiveness resulting in optimistic, intermediate and pessimistic global scenarios. Globally, a school shutdown of 5 months could generate learning losses that have a present value of $10 trillion. By this measure, the world could stand to lose as much as 16 percent of the investments that governments make in the basic education of this cohort of students. The world could thus face a substantial setback in achieving the goal of halving the percentage of learning poor and be unable to meet the goal by 2030 unless drastic remedial action is taken.
Child health and delivery of care during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph L. Mathew

Published: June 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

This paper examines how the pandemic and mitigation efforts affected the physical and emotional well-being of parents and children in India. Although pediatric cases are fewer and milder, pediatric health care services are severely affected in the country and restarting these services is necessary. Several additional issues merit consideration, both with respect to COVID, as well as other child health needs affected by COVID.

Cite this research | Vol.: 87 | No. of pages: 579-582 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child care services, child education, child health, health care facilities | Countries: India
Should schools reopen early or late? : transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Vijesh S. Kuttiatt; Ramesh P. Menon; Philip Raj Abraham

Published: June 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics volume
This article deals with the uncertainty regarding time line of school reopening. Given the unique disease characteristics and the transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in children, it favours calibrated early reopening for two reasons: prolonged closure of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to have negative psychosocial effect in children besides secondary economic effects, and societal learning and grooming of children that happens in school environment cannot be supplanted by a virtual learning platform.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 87 | No. of pages: 755-756 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, child health, e-learning, school attendance
Academic motherhood during COVID-19: navigating our dual roles as educators and mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Batsheva Guy; Brittany Arthur

Published: June 2020
During the COVID‐19 crisis, being a working mother has taken on a whole new meaning, as mothers navigate working from home while juggling childcare, as well as coming to terms with their intersecting identities. The current article is a feminist, heartful autoethnographic account, couched in Relational‐Cultural Theory, surrounding our authentic experiences working from home and raising children during the worldwide pandemic. We explore academic motherhood, working from home, mental health, and coping during coronavirus and stay‐at‐home orders through engaged dialogue. We hope that showcasing our vulnerability can lead to change in the expectations we put on mothers in academia, while at the same time connect with readers who may be going through similar challenges.
The invisible COVID-19 graveyard: intergenerational losses for the poorest young people and actions to address a human development pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Orazio Attanasio; Ranjita Rajan

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: May 2020

The pandemic’s impact is unequivocally unequal. This is true for educational opportunity and outcomes as well as other dimensions: the poorest are far more vulnerable to the economic, health and learning support shocks of the pandemic. Furthermore, policies to limit COVID-19’s transmission impose unequal burdens, exacerbating inequality and poverty. This is magnified for the youngest, with the pandemic unleashing large negative spillover impacts for children, and these effects are compounded for those in poorer households. Parenting practices and a stable environment during a child’s early years are critical in determining outcomes in later life. The addition of formal learning becomes vital in later childhood and teenage years for determining life outcomes in adulthood.

What are the lessons learned from supporting education in conflicts and emergencies that could be relevant for EdTech-related responses to COVID- 19?

AUTHOR(S)
Joe Hallgarten; Kristine Gorgen; Kate Sims

Institution: Education Development Center
Published: May 2020
This report explores lessons from conflict and education in emergencies (EiE) seeking evidence-informed recommendations for policy makers that can help in the global response to Covid-19. The report explores transferability from EiE contexts to non-EiE Covid-19-affected contexts. The issue of how Covid-19 will impact on existing EiE contexts and displaced pupils is a vital one, but it is beyond the scope of this review.
Are our Children Learning? The Status of Remote-learning among School-going Children in Kenya during the Covid-19 Crisis
Institution: Uwezo Kenya
Published: May 2020

This survey collected data on the status of remote learning among school-going children across the country. It was conducted in 86 out of the total 335 sub-counties across 42 of the 47counties. We leveraged technology to collect data using the KoboCollect platform via phone calls from 3,735 households spread in 258 villages.

Toward sustainable learning during school suspension: socioeconomic, occupational aspirations, and learning behavior of Vietnamese students during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Trung Tran; Anh-Duc Hoang; Yen-Chi Nguyen (et al.)

Published: May 2020   Journal: Sustainability
The overspread of the novel coronavirus—SARS-CoV-2—over the globe has caused significant damage to manufacturing and service businesses, regardless of whether they are commercial, public, or not-for-profit sectors. While both the short-term and long-term impacts of most companies can be approximately measured or estimated, it is challenging to address the enduring effects of COVID-19 on teaching and learning activities. The target of this research is to investigate students’ manners of studying at home during the school suspension time as a result of COVID-19. Through analyzing original survey data from 420 K6–12 students in Hanoi, Vietnam, this work demonstrates the different learning habits of students with different socioeconomic statuses and occupational aspirations during the disease’s outbreak.
271 - 285 of 301

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.