CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   658     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
496 - 510 of 658
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with COVID-19 in children in Pakistan

AUTHOR(S)
Masood Sadiq; Omeir Ali Aziz; Uzma Kazmi (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The knowledge of COVID-19 is evolving with new aspects of the disease continuing to emerge. Children and adolescents younger than 20 years of age constitute 10·6% of the total reported confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Pakistan as of July 8, 2020, with a mortality of 0·3% for those aged 10 years or younger and 0·5% for those aged 11–20 years. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), also known as paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (PIMS-TS) is being reported primarily from Europe and the USA. Many of these children meet the criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease, but different clinical presentations of this inflammatory disorder are being reported. The ethnic origin of reported cases show that Black, Hispanic, and Asian children might be disproportionally affected. Similarly, unlike Kawasaki disease, these cases have occurred in older children and adolescents.
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children in South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Webb; Deepthi Raju Abraham; Ayodele Faleye (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
There are reports of a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with COVID-19 known as MIS-C or paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (PIMS-TS).  The definition of MIS-C issued by WHO includes clinical and laboratory features, with evidence of COVID-19, or likely contact with a person who has or has had COVID-19. South Africa has the most reported COVID-19 cases in Africa, with the Western Cape Province acting as the initial epicentre with a total of 93.414 people with confirmed COVID-19 by July 31, 2020, of whom 2910 were younger than 15 years old.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, infectious disease, respiratory diseases | Countries: South Africa
The impact of school closures and lockdown on mental health in young people

AUTHOR(S)
Ellen Townsend

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child and Adolescent Mental Health
The COVID‐19 pandemic lockdown response has had a disproportionate and damaging effect on the lives, mental health and well‐being of young people globally. They have been neglected in policy‐making and their needs have been subjugated to those of adults which contravenes the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. This commentary argues that the needs and rights of young people must come first to protect their health, mental health and futures.
Feasibility and effectiveness of teleconsultation in children with epilepsy amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in a resource-limited country

AUTHOR(S)
Prateek Kumar Panda; Lesa Dawman; Pragnya Panda (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Seizure
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown measures employed by the government have forced neurologists across the world to look upon telemedicine as the only feasible and practical option to continue providing health care towards children with epilepsy in home isolation. Children with epilepsy are challenging for teleconsultation as direct information from the patient is missing, regarding seizures and adverse effects, especially behavioral and psychological side effects.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 81 | No. of pages: 29-35 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: India
The prevalence of behavioral problems among school-aged children in home quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic in China

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Liu; Xinyan Xie; Qi Xue (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

To prevent spreading of the COVID-19 infection, many countries have implemented a nationwide school closure. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of behavioral problems in school-aged children during home confinement.  An internet-based survey involving 1264 children (grades 2-6) and their parents from two primary schools between February 25 and March 8, 2020 was conducted in Hubei province, China. Behavioral problems were evaluated using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).

Rapid-cycle community assessment of health-related social needs of children and families during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kristin N. Ray; Anna K. Ettinger; Namita Dwarakanath (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Academic Pediatrics
Over half of families with children reported unmet health or social service needs during the first month of a county-wide COVID-19 stay-at-home order. Unmet needs varied with race, ethnicity, and income and with duration of the stay-at-home order. This study aims to identify unmet health and social resource needs during a county-wide COVID-19 stay-at-home order and phased re-opening in the US.
How societal responses to COVID-19 could contribute to child neglect

AUTHOR(S)
A. Bérubé; M.-E. Clément; V. Lafantaisie (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The ecosystemic approach to children’s needs demands a cohesive response from societies, communities, and families. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the choices societies made to protect their community members from the virus could have created contexts of child neglect. With the closure of services and institutions, societies were no longer available to help meet the needs of children. The purpose of this study is to examine parents’ reports on the response their children received to their needs during the COVID-19 crisis. During the period of the spring 2020 lockdown, 414 parents in the province of Quebec, Canada, completed an online questionnaire about the impact of the crisis on the response their children received to their needs.
Risk factors for re‐detectable positivity in recovered COVID‐19 children

AUTHOR(S)
Denggao Peng; Jing Zhang; Yiling Ji (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology

This paper aims to identify the risk factors for redetectable positivity, and to provide a basis for prevention and control of coronavirus disease‐2019 (COVID‐19) in children. A retrospective study was performed on all pediatric patients diagnosed with COVID‐19. Redetectable positivity was defined as the positive result of real‐time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) after symptom resolution and discharge. Children were defined as being less than 18 years old.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 55 | Issue: 12 | No. of pages: 3602-3609 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, disease control, disease prevention
Helping siblings of children with behavioral health disorders weather the COVID‐19 storm

AUTHOR(S)
Wendy Plante

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter
As schools and outpatient clinics shut their doors in the spring of 2020 in response to the COVID‐19 pandemic, children with developmental disabilities were being taught at home, with their parents helping to facilitate their education and many of their special services, sometimes with professionals on the other end of a screen and sometimes not. While it is too soon to know from empirical research how these circumstances have affected typically developing, healthy siblings, we can use the existing research on sibling needs to help parents, schools, medical and behavioral providers, and community supports to predict impact on siblings and put supports into place.
Testing our children when the world shuts down: analyzing recommendations for adapted tele-assessment during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Shelley Kathleen Krach; Tracy L. Paskiewicz; Malaya M. Monk

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment
In 2017, the National Association of School Psychologists described tele-assessment as the least researched area of telehealth. This became problematic in 2020 when COVID-19 curtailed the administration of face-to-face assessments. Publishers began to offer computer-adapted tele-assessment methods for tests that had only previously been administered in person. Recommendations for adapted tele-assessment practice had to be developed with little empirical data. The current study analyzed recommendations from entities including professional organizations, test publishers, and governmental offices.
Ushering children with disabilities in the ‘new normal’ post-COVID-19 period: collective actions in the Philippines

AUTHOR(S)
Michael B. Cahapay

Published: October 2020   Journal: Disability & Society
This issue paper describes the collective actions to usher children with disabilities in the new normal post-COVID-19 period in the Philippines. These actions focus on assistive technologies to augment information and communication, critical services to sustain medical and developmental needs, adaptive learning methods to continue education, and other social services to improve access and mobility. Set within a single national context, this issue paper provides a view as regards the shared initiatives to improve the conditions of children with disabilities in a developing country amid the pandemic.
Using a rapid assessment methodology to identify and address immediate needs among low-income households with children during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Shreela V. Sharma; Amier Haidar; Jacqueline Noyola (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Plos One
Brighter Bites is a school-based health promotion program that delivers fresh produce and nutrition education to low-income children and families. Due to COVID-19-related school closures, states were under “shelter in place” orders, and Brighter Bites administered a rapid assessment survey to identify social needs among their families. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the methodology used to identify those with greatest social needs during this time (“high risk”), and to describe the response of Brighter Bites to these “high risk” families.
Impact of COVID-19 outbreak on mental health and perceived strain among caregivers tending children with special needs

AUTHOR(S)
Sapna Dhiman; Pradeep Kumar Sahu; William R. Reed (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

While COVID-19 outbreak has had adverse psychological effects in children with special needs, the mental state and burden on their caregivers during this pandemic has yet to be reported. The COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on caregiver strain compared to perceived strain before the pandemic. Prevalence of depressive symptoms is high among caregivers of children with special needs. Negative perception of homecare therapy is associated with higher perceived strain and poor mental health. Not using tele-rehabilitation and perception of it being a poor medium for rehabilitation pose greater mental health risks.

Pediatric Teleheath: opportunities created by the COVID-19 and suggestions to sustain its use to support families of children with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Chantal Camden; Mindy Silva

Published: October 2020   Journal: Physical & Occupational Therapy In Pediatrics
Telehealth is being rapidly adopted by physical and occupational therapists in pediatrics as a strategy to maintain services during the COVID-19 crisis. This perspective presents a mix of theoretical and practice perspectives to support the implementation of telehealth. Although research evidence is just emerging, there is sufficient indication to believe telehealth is effective. However, which telehealth strategies are best for which children and families, and which intervention goals, are not yet clear.
The effect of the Coronavirus (Covid -19) pandemic on health-related quality of life in children

AUTHOR(S)
Derya Adıbelli; Adem Sümen

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The study was conducted to examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on health-related quality of life in children. The study was conducted with 597 children aged 7–13 and their parents using the online data collection tool via social media.
496 - 510 of 658

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on violence against children and women during COVID-19.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.