CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   641     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
586 - 600 of 641
COVID-19 enters a new arena: how do we help families prepare for return to school?

AUTHOR(S)
Dana Abenstein

Published: August 2020   Journal: Canadian Family Physician
This article tries to provide parents with ideas on how to help children to adjust to school reopening.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Child Protection | Tags: child health, lockdown, school attendance | Countries: Canada
COVID-19 in children: should we be worried?

AUTHOR(S)
Candice Laverne Hendricks

Published: August 2020   Journal: South African Medical Journal
Reports indicate that children infected with SARS-CoV-2 have thus far presented with less severe disease than adults. Anxiety regarding a greater ability to transmit the virus is largely unfounded and has played a significant role in the decision to allow children to return to school. In some patients, however, especially in infants and in those with underlying comorbidities, severe disease must be anticipated and planned for accordingly. The most relevant severe clinical presentation in addition to the established respiratory complications, is that of a multisystem inflammatory disorder, with features resembling Kawasaki disease.
Child health, remote work and the female wage penalty

AUTHOR(S)
Amairisa Kouki; Robert M. Sauer

Published: August 2020
Using data on American women and the health status of their children, this paper studies the effect of remote work on female earnings. Instrumental variables estimates, which exploit a temporary child health shock as exogenous variation in the propensity to work at home, yield an hourly wage penalty of 77.1 percent. Earnings losses together with positive selection, and alternative first stage regressions, suggest that task re-assignment or lack of social interaction are likely mechanisms. The estimates also have implications for the costs of social distancing during a pandemic and may be especially applicable when children must be temporarily quarantined.
Cite this research | Issue: IZA DP No. 13648 | No. of pages: 24 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Social Protection, Well-being and Equity | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown, women's employment | Countries: United States
COVID‐19 pandemic‐related psychopathology in children and adolescents with mental illness

AUTHOR(S)
Oskar Hougaard Jefsen; Christopher Rohde; Bettina Nørremark (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease (COVID‐19) pandemic is likely to have negative health consequences way beyond those caused by the virus per se – including significant psychological distress. Children and adolescents who already live with a mental illness may be particularly vulnerable to the distress associated with the pandemic – due to, for example, fear of the virus as well as the significant societal changes launched to minimize spread of the virus (social distancing and quarantine). In this editorial perspective, this study (a) provides data on COVID‐19 pandemic‐related psychopathology in children and adolescents from a large psychiatric treatment setting in Denmark, (b) gives advice on how the likely harmful effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health of children and adolescents may be minimized, and (c) proposes six lines of research into pandemic‐related psychopathology with emphasis on children and adolescents.
How should our testing behavior change with time in children in current COVID‐19 pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Zhang; Jilei Lin; Hongmei Xu (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: European Journal of Clinical Investigation

More paediatric‐confirmed cases have been reported with the global pandemic of COVID‐19. This study aims to summarize the key points and supply suggestions on screening paediatric COVID‐19 patients more appropriately. We retrospectively included paediatric patients who have accepted SARS‐CoV‐2 RT‐PCR testing in Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (30 January 2020 to 13 February 2020) and compared them with paediatric‐confirmed COVID‐19 cases. Besides, a review was carried out by analysing all current literature about laboratory‐confirmed paediatric cases with COVID‐19.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, hospitalization, infectious disease | Countries: China
COVID-19 aftershocks: out of time
Institution: World Vision
Published: July 2020

As families' incomes plummet, millions more children go hungry and are forced to work and beg. Millions of parents and caregivers have lost incomes and jobs due to COVID-19, forcing them to expose their children to harmful and dangerous circumstances, such as begging or child marriage. World Vision has conducted rapid assessments in 24 countries across Latin AmericaSub-Saharan Africa, and Asia confirming alarming predictions of increased child hunger, violence, and poverty due to the economic impact of COVID-19. These assessment results give further evidence that the most vulnerable families and their children are hardest hit in such crises. Those living in fragile countries already suffering from conflict, climate change, instability or displacement as well as those already receiving humanitarian assistance are suffering even greater injustices because of the pandemic.

Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents an inflection point in history and will be generation-defining for our young. Some have called the pandemic the “9-11 of Generation Z” and note the creation of a new generation of “Quaranteens” or “Coronials.”  The pandemic has deeply affected the health and wellbeing of children, adolescents, and families in multiple ways.
A literature review of 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV2) infection in neonates and children

AUTHOR(S)
Matteo Di Nardo; Grace van Leeuwen; Alessandra Loreti (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
At the time of writing, there are already millions of documented infections worldwide by the novel coronavirus 2019 (2019-nCoV or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2)), with hundreds of thousands of deaths. The great majority of fatal events have been recorded in adults older than 70 years; of them, a large proportion had comorbidities. Since data regarding the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics in neonates and children developing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are scarce and originate mainly from one country (China), this survey reviews all the current literature from 1 December 2019 to 7 May 2020 to provide useful information about SARS-CoV2 viral biology, epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, prevention, and hospital organization for clinicians dealing with this selected population.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: bibliographies, child health, COVID-19, health care, impact
European consensus recommendations for neonatal and paediatric retrievals of positive or suspected COVID-19 patients

AUTHOR(S)
Ulrich Terheggen; Christian Heiring; Mattias Kjellberg (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The 2020 novel coronavirus (SARS-Cov-2) pandemic necessitates tailored recommendations addressing specific procedures for neonatal and paediatric transport of suspected or positive COVID-19 patients. The aim of this consensus statement is to define guidelines for safe clinical care for children needing inter-facility transport while making sure that the clinical teams involved are sufficiently protected from SARS-CoV-2. A taskforce, composed of members of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care (ESPNIC) Transport section and the European Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), reviewed the published literature and used a rapid, twostep modified Delphi process to formulate recommendations regarding safety and clinical management during transport of COVID19 patients.
COVID-19 PICU guidelines: for high- and limited-resource settings

AUTHOR(S)
Saraswati Kache; Mohammod Jobayer Chisti; Felicity Gumbo (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
Fewer children than adults have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the clinical manifestations are distinct from those of adults. Some children particularly those with acute or chronic co-morbidities are likely to develop critical illness. Recently, a multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) has been described in children with some of these patients requiring care in the pediatric ICU. An international collaboration was formed to review the available evidence and develop evidence-based guidelines for the care of critically ill children with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Where the evidence was lacking, those gaps were replaced with consensus-based guidelines. This process has generated 44 recommendations related to pediatric COVID-19 patients presenting with respiratory distress or failure, sepsis or septic shock, cardiopulmonary arrest, MIS-C, those requiring adjuvant therapies, or ECMO. Evidence to explain the milder disease patterns in children and the potential to use repurposed anti-viral drugs, anti-inflammatory or anti-thrombotic therapies are also described.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 88 | No. of pages: 705-716 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health care, multi-country, public health
Care delivery for children with epilepsy during the COVID-19 pandemic: an international survey

AUTHOR(S)
Elaine C. Wirrell; Zachary M. Grinspan; Kelly G. Knupp

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Neurology
This paper aims to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on global access to care and practice patterns for children with epilepsy. It is based on a cross-sectional, online survey of pediatric neurologists across the world affiliated with the International Child Neurology Association, the Chinese Child Neurology Society, the Child Neurology Society, and the Pediatric Epilepsy Research Consortium. Results were analyzed in relation to regional burden of COVID-19 disease.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 35 | Issue: 13 | No. of pages: 924-933 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown
Media monitoring during COVID-19: domestic violence, sexual violence, child abuse, women’s rights, gender equality

AUTHOR(S)
Lana Wells

Published: July 2020
Between December 1, 2019 and July 16, 2020, this document has been updated daily with the goal of compiling media updates related to domestic violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, gender equality and women’s rights during COVID-19 in selected countries. The objective of this process was to monitor and understand media coverage of these issues to inform the development and implementation of policies, programs, and approaches to prevent and address domestic violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, and gender inequality in the context of COVID-19.
Characterisation of COVID-19 pandemic in paediatric age group: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Naira M. Mustafa; Laila A. Selim

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Clinical Virology
This article performes a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyse the disease characterisation in paediatric age group including the possibility of vertical transmission to the neonates.
How is immunosuppressive status affecting children and adults in SARS-CoV-2 infection?: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Chiara Minotti; Francesca Tirelli; Elisa Barbieri (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Infection
SARS-CoV-2 infection has now a global resonance. Data on how COVID-19 is affecting immunocompromised patients are however few. This study aims to systematically review the current knowledge on SARS-CoV-2 cases in children and adults with immunosuppression, to evaluate outcomes in this special population.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 81 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 61-66 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, COVID-19
Radiological findings of COVID-19 in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Jogender Kumar; Jitendra Meena; Arushi Yadav (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

The majority of the children with SARS-CoV-2 infection present with respiratory symptoms, hence various chest imaging modalities have been used in the management. Knowledge about the radiological findings of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in children is limited. Hence, this article aims to systematically synthesize the available data that will help in better management of COVID-19 in children. Four different electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and CENTRAL) were searched for articles reporting radiological findings in children with COVID-19. Studies reporting thoracic radiological findings of COVID-19 in patients aged <19 years were included. A random-effect meta-analysis (wherever feasible) was performed to provide pooled estimates of various findings.

586 - 600 of 641

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on violence against children and women during COVID-19.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.