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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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436 - 450 of 483
School closures and social anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Matthew Morrissette

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
This paper deals with effects that social isolation and loneliness may have on children and adolescents during the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
COVID-19 related anxiety in children and adolescents with severe obesity: a mixed-methods study

AUTHOR(S)
Ozair Abawi; Mila S. Welling; Emma van den Eynde (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Clinical Obesity
Recent studies report negative mental health effects of the COVID-19 related lockdown measures in general paediatric cohorts. Since obesity is a risk factor for  COVID-19 in adults, children (including adolescents) with obesity might perceive themselves to be vulnerable. Using a combined quantitative and qualitative approach,  this study explored COVID-19 related anxiety in paediatric patients with severe obesity in the Netherlands using semi-structured telephone interviews and the  Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) questionnaire, which had also been completed by the study population at baseline in the year prior to the COVID-19 outbreak.
COVID-19 in children and adolescents with endocrine conditions

AUTHOR(S)
Eirini Kostopoulou; Maria Güemes; Pratik Shah

Published: September 2020   Journal: Physician's Weekly
The present review comprehensively collects recommendations issued by various health organizations and endocrine associations for the management of pediatric endocrine conditions during the pandemic.
Creatively cope stress of children during lockdown: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Mansi Dwivedi; Vaibhav Srivastava

Published: September 2020   Journal: The International Journal of Indian Psychȯlogy
This paper aims to identify the signs of stress in children during lockdown in India and to help children coping with their psychological stress during lockdown in India.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 326-330 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, child well-being, lockdown, psychological distress | Countries: India
Children, dying parents and COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Steve Marshall; Andrew Rowland; Susan Higgins (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: British Journal of Child Health
This paper evaluates the impact that COVID-19 pandemic had on children’s involvement when a parent is dying in the UK. Culturally competent, evidence-based services should be urgently commissioned to meet the holistic needs of children when a parent is dying with COVID-19 to reduce the risks of long-term harm.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 1 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, death | Countries: United Kingdom
Supporting families to protect child health: parenting quality and household needs during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Leslie E. Roos; Emily Cameron; Jennifer Lisa Penner Protudjer (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Supportive parenting is critical for promoting healthy child development in the face of stressors, such as those occurring during COVID-19. Here, we address a knowledge gap regarding specific household risk factors associated with parenting quality during the pandemic and incorporate first-person accounts of family challenges and needs. Lower quality parenting during COVID-19 is associated with multiple household and pandemic risk factors, with caregiver depression consistently linked to parentchild
relationship disruptions. Focused efforts are needed to address caregiver mental health to protect child health as part of the pandemic response.
Impact of social distancing on the mental health of parents and children in Qatar

AUTHOR(S)
Mohamed Abdelrahman; Duaa Al-Adwan; Youssef Hassan

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Vaccine
This study investigates the effects of COVID-19-related social distancing practices on parents and children’s mental health and explored the roles parental activities with children and coping strategies among families in Qatar. The path analysis shows that social distancing practices influence both parents’ and children’s mental health through parents’ activities with children and their coping strategies. Our findings reveal how living under stressful conditions such as COVID-19 could enhance the mental health of family members.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 33 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, mental health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Qatar
A systematic review and meta‐analysis of children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19)

AUTHOR(S)
Xiaojian Cui; Zhihu Zhao; Tongqiang Zhang (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Medical Virology
To provide a comprehensive and systematic analysis of demographic characteristics, clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and imaging features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) in pediatric patients. A meta‐analysis was carried out to identify studies on COVID‐19 from 25 December 2019 to 30 April 2020. A total of 48 studies with 5829 pediatric patients were included.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 1 | No. of pages: 1057-1069 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, child health, child mental health, coronavirus, COVID-19
Impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on mental health of children and adolescents: A narrative review with recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Shweta Singh; Deblina Roy; Krittika Sinha (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychiatry Research

COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown has brought about a sense of fear and anxiety around the globe. This phenomenon has led to short term as well as long term psychosocial and mental health implications for children and adolescents. The quality and magnitude of impact on minors is determined by many vulnerability factors like developmental age, educational status, pre-existing mental health condition, being economically underprivileged or being quarantined due to infection or fear of infection. This paper is aimed at narratively reviewing various articles related to mental-health aspects of children and adolescents impacted by COVID-19 pandemic and enforcement of nationwide or regional lockdowns to prevent further spread of infection.

Addressing the indirect effects of COVID-19 on the health of children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Neil Chanchlani; Francine Buchanan; Peter J. Gill

Published: August 2020   Journal: CMAJ
Countries that have seen substantial disruption to usual medical services and widespread public health measures related to COVID-19 are likely to see both immediate and long term indirect effects of the pandemic on health. The potential adverse effects on children and young people’s health may be underappreciated. This paper discusses how limited access to primary and secondary health care, parental fear of seeking health care, daycare and school closures, employment and financial instability, and greater risk of exposure to adverse childhood experiences may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. It also considers potential mitigation strategies, including restructuring the way in which health care is delivered for children and young people.
Why we need longitudinal mental health research with children and youth during (and after) the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Mark Wade; Heather Prime; Dillon T. Browne

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychiatry Research
In recent weeks, dozens of studies have been designed to examine the mental health consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Absent from the literature is the expressed need for research that is both longitudinal and developmental. To date, studies with children and youth have been almost exclusively cross-sectional While immensely informative, these studies cannot speak to the long-term effects of the pandemic, nor the complex set of stressors that instigate these difficulties or the mechanisms through which those stressors operate. This article presents five common effects that occur in developmental psychopathology that emphasize the need for longitudinal mental health research with children and youth.
COVID-19 and refugee and immigrant youth: a community-based mental health perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Tarik Endale; Nicole St. Jean; Dina Birman

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
This article is acomment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces.
following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a
program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based
mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced
trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services
in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly
transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and
flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural
barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges
include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces.
Talking to children about illness and death of a loved one during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth Rapa; Louise Dalton; Alan Stein

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
In the midst of the devastating death toll and hospitalisations from COVID-19, the psychological effect of this unfolding pandemic on children has been unconscionably overlooked. The overwhelming media coverage and barrage of public health messages sustain a high level of physical and emotional threat within our communities, which is intensely observed by children. Age-appropriate explanations are paramount to ensure children have a coherent narrative and emotional support for their experiences. This need is magnified when someone in the family is hospitalised for or dies from COVID-19.
Managing psychological distress in children and adolescents following the COVID-19 epidemic: a cooperative approach

AUTHOR(S)
Xiao Zhou

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic.
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend
to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations
often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many
adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic
atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of
psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend
to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations
often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many
adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic
atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of
psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic
After COVID-19, a future for the world's children?

AUTHOR(S)
Helen Clark; Awa Marie Coll-Seck; Anshu Banerjee (et al.)

Institution: WHO, *UNICEF, The Lancet
Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet
This report shows how children are less affected clinically by COVID-19 than adults. Nonetheless, children are impacted by the pandemic’s indirect effects, not least from separation or loss in their own families. Projections suggest that over a million preventable child deaths might occur due to decreased access to food and disruption of essential health services. Children risk missing out on growth monitoring, preventive care, and timely management of acute disease and injuries.
436 - 450 of 483

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.