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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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The COVID-19 pandemic and community health workers: an opportunity to maintain delivery of care and education for families of children with epilepsy in Zambia

AUTHOR(S)
Lauren Sham; Ornella Ciccone; Archana A. Patel

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Global Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the delivery of care for chronic neurological diseases globally. As requirements for physical distancing have led to restrictions on the availability of health care services, many countries have adapted methods of telemedicine to sustain care access for patients, while making difficult decisions surrounding which aspects of direct clinical care can be deferred and the time span acceptable for delaying chronic medical care. For people with epilepsy, issues such as determining criteria for what constitutes urgent management, managing the risk of increased seizures in the setting of illness, as well as ensuring a stable medication supply, have all been raised as critical concerns during this pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 10 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 3 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, community health services, COVID-19 response, health services, lockdown | Countries: Zambia
Building on an ad hoc Covid-19 response to enhance community-based care for vulnerable children in Kerala, India

AUTHOR(S)
Geeta Madathil Govindaraj; Padinharath Krishnakumar; Vinod Scaria (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: NEJM Catalyst Innovations in Care Delivery
The Covid-19–related lockdowns resulted in disruptions of care for children with inborn errors of immunity, who, without access to travel, would be unable to continue immunoglobulin replacement. A community-based care program through pediatricians in state-run peripheral hospitals has been initiated. The police network, which was already actively involved in Covid-19 prevention, helped transport essential medicines from the tertiary care center. Two months later, a virtual focus group discussions with the mothers was conducted to understand their experiences, identify possible gaps in care, and explore suggestions for improvement. Although the community-based care and subsequent virtual focus group discussions were instituted as a temporary measure to ensure continuity of care, it has been found that it is effective, feasible, and acceptable. Hence, it has been decided to continue the program even beyond the pandemic. This model of care can be extended to other chronic illnesses as well as to rare diseases in resource-constrained settings.
Working with communities to mitigate the collateral impact of COVID-19 on children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Coughlan; Arpana Soni; Hanan Ghouneim

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The complex consequences of the pandemic cannot be addressed sustainably without community engagement, which takes on renewed importance in our era of ‘fake news’ and scepticism towards authority figures. This case study suggests that citizens value direct involvement in codesigning policy resources as it provides them with a sense of control during a crisis. Young people can participate directly in research as peer researchers, giving them new skills and simultaneously enhancing access to seldom-heard groups. This citizen-led approach to health and care in confirm the value of participatory research and community engagement in driving sustainable, patient-centred change.
Maternal and newborn care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya: re-contextualizing the community midwifery model

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Wangari Kimani; Rose Maina; Constance Shumba (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Human Resources for Health
Peripartum deaths remain significantly high in low- and middle-income countries, including Kenya. The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted essential services, which could lead to an increase in maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, the lockdowns, curfews, and increased risk for contracting COVID-19 may affect how women access health facilities. SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus that requires a community-centred response, not just hospital-based interventions. In this prolonged health crisis, pregnant women deserve a safe and humanised birth that prioritises the physical and emotional safety of the mother and the baby. There is an urgent need for innovative strategies to prevent the deterioration of maternal and child outcomes in an already strained health system. 
A surveillance system for the maternal and child health (MCH) population during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Veronica B. Ajewole; Ahone E. Ngujede; Emmanuella Oduguwa (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of MCH and AIDS
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and its ensuing mitigation measures have negatively affected the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) population. There is currently no surveillance system established to enhance our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 transmission to guide policy decision making to protect the MCH population in this pandemic. Based on reports of community and household spread of this novel infection, this study presents an approach to a robust family-centered surveillance system for the MCH population. The surveillance system encapsulates data at the individual and community levels to inform stakeholders, policy makers, health officials and the general public about SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics within the MCH population.
Building trust within and across communities for health emergency preparedness: community engagement for behavioural and social change
Published: July 2020
Public trust in institutions in all parts of society is critical for health emergency preparedness. Leaders in government, science,public health,the private sector, international organizations, civil society,and the media are charged with identifying potential health risks and developing measures that will minimize their impact. But often, the threats are theoretical, something that may occur in the future, and difficult for many people to grasp as they address their very real day to day needs. It is only through empathy, accurate communications, community partnership, and effective actions that leaders generate the societal investments in resources and energy required to mitigate the effects of potential health hazards.Understanding the importance of public trust in institutions is especially critical during the COVID-19 outbreak,whose containment relies on the cooperative actions of business, NGOs,governments, communities and individuals.
Community-based health care, including outreach and campaigns, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic
Community-based health care is an essential part of primary care at all times; in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the distinct capacity of trusted community members for social engagement and delivering care where it is needed is ever more critical. This joint WHO, UNICEF and IFRC guidance addresses the role of community-based health care in the pandemic context. It includes practical recommendations for decision makers to help keep communities and health workers safe, to sustain essential services at the community level, and to ensure an effective response to COVID-19. Using this comprehensive and coordinated approach will help countries strengthen the resilience of community-based health services throughout the pandemic, into early recovery and beyond.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.