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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 31
Risk factors for re‐detectable positivity in recovered COVID‐19 children

AUTHOR(S)
Denggao Peng; Jing Zhang; Yiling Ji (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology

This paper aims to identify the risk factors for redetectable positivity, and to provide a basis for prevention and control of coronavirus disease‐2019 (COVID‐19) in children. A retrospective study was performed on all pediatric patients diagnosed with COVID‐19. Redetectable positivity was defined as the positive result of real‐time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) after symptom resolution and discharge. Children were defined as being less than 18 years old.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 55 | Issue: 12 | No. of pages: 3602-3609 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, disease control, disease prevention, COVID-19
What chances do children have against COVID-19? Is the answer hidden within the thymus?

AUTHOR(S)
Hatice Güneş; Serpil Dinçer; Can Acıpayam (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
As with other types of coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 affects children less frequently, and it has been observed that the disease is mild. In the pathogenesis of a standard viral infection, the pathogen’s contact with the mucosa is initially followed by an innate immunity response. T cells are the primary decisive element in adaptive immunity capability. For this reason, the adaptive immune response mediated by the thymus is a process that regulates the immune response responsible for preventing invasive damage from a virus. Regulatory T cells (T-reg) are active during the early periods of life and have precise roles in immunomodulation. The thymus is highly active in the intrauterine and neonatal period; it begins to shrink after birth and continues its activity until adolescence. The loss of T-reg function by age results in difficulty with the control of the immune response, increased inflammation as shown in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as an inflammatory storm. Also, the thymus is typically able to replace the T cells destroyed by apoptosis caused by the virus. Thymus and T cells are the key factors of pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 in children. Since thymus activity and T lymphocyte function in children protect them against the virus effects, stimulating and preventing the inhibition of the thymus can be possible treatment components against COVID-19.
COVID-19 trends among school-aged children — United States, March 1–September 19, 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca T. Leeb; Sandy Price; Sarah Sliwa (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Children aged <10 years can transmit SARS-CoV-2 in school settings, but less is known about COVID-19 incidence, characteristics, and health outcomes among school-aged children (aged 5–17 years) with COVID-19. Since March, 277,285 COVID-19 cases in children have been reported. COVID-19 incidence among adolescents aged 12–17 years was approximately twice that in children aged 5–11 years. Underlying conditions were more common among school-aged children with severe outcomes related to COVID-19. Weekly incidence, SARS-CoV-2 test volume, and percentage of tests positive among school-aged children varied over time and by region of the United States. It is important for schools and communities to monitor multiple indicators of COVID-19 among school-aged children and layer prevention strategies to reduce COVID-19 disease risk for students, teachers, school staff, and families. These results can provide a baseline for monitoring trends and evaluating mitigation strategies.

Cite this research | Vol.: 69 | No. of pages: 1410-1415 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, disease control, disease transmission, schools, COVID-19 | Countries: United States
Adapting HIV services for pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants, children, adolescents and families in resource‐constrained settings during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Alexandra C. Vrazo; Rachel Golin; Nimasha B. Fernando (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Protecting pregnant and breastfeeding women, infants, children and adolescents from acquiring SARS‐CoV‐2 while sustaining essential HIV services is an immense global health challenge. Tailored, family friendly programme adaptations for case‐finding, ART delivery and viral load monitoring for these populations have the potential to limit SARS‐CoV‐2 transmission while ensuring the continuity of life‐saving HIV case identification and treatment efforts.
Responding to non-communicable diseases during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic

This brief provides guidance for governments, policymakers, UN agencies and development partners to address non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as an integral part of the COVID-19 response and in broader efforts for achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. NCDs, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease, are amplifying the impacts of COVID-19, and COVID-19 is exacerbating the burden of NCDs, particularly in already disadvantaged communities. Almost one fourth (22%) of the global population is estimated to have an underlying condition that increases their vulnerability to COVID-19, and most of these conditions are NCDs. Urgent action across sectors is needed to address the root causes of NCDs and increase access to affordable and quality treatments and prevention.

A citizen science facemask experiment and educational modules to improve coronavirus safety in communities and schools

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah E. Eichler; Austin P. Hopperton; Juan José Alava (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Medicine
There is need to support facemask citizen science and experiential education among children and families as the globe exits from the current lockdown, and teachers and students desire and seek for safe strategies to return to densely-attended schools. COVID-19 is a pandemic respiratory disease that disseminates as infectious respiratory or saliva droplets are released into the environment as people talk, sneeze, and cough. Currently the most publicized methods to prevent local transmission of COVID-19 and promote “droplet safety” in hospitals and communities include hand washing, social distancing, and stay-at-home strategies. In contrast to established benefits for medical masks in hospitals, the benefits of wearing masks or face covers/coverings (hereafter, “facemask”) in the community have been inconsistently debated by the media, creating confusion, and misinformation. Furthermore, high-profile political leaders in countries heavily affected by the pandemic have given misleading signs regarding containment measures associated with COVID-19 increasingly polarizing local communities around arguments on the value of facemasks in promoting public health, which is critically important to incentivize during the emergence of citizens from their lockdowns and during the phase of reopening local economies.
An analysis of child-care and school outbreak data and evidence-based recommendations for opening schools & keeping them open

AUTHOR(S)
Fiona Russell; Kathryn Snow; Margie Danchin (et al.)

Published: September 2020
This report is an analysis of the global literature and available Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) and school outbreak data, 25 January 2020 – 31 August 2020. It aims to explore the role of ECEC and schools in transmission of SARS-CoV-2.
Surveillance of COVID-19 school outbreaks, Germany, March to August 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Eveline Otte im Kampe; Ann-Sophie Lehfeld; Silke Buda (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Eurosurveillance
Mitigation of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in Germany included school closures in early March 2020. After reopening in April, preventive measures were taken in schools. This paper analyses national surveillance system data on COVID-19 school outbreaks during different time periods. After reopening, smaller outbreaks (average: 2.2/week) occurred despite low incidence in the general population. School closures might have a detrimental effect on children and should be applied only cautiously and in combination with other measures.
Objectives for COVID-19 testing in school settings
Institution: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control
Published: August 2020
The aim of this document is to provide an overview of major aspects of testing, contact tracing, contact identification and contact follow-up in school settings within the EU/EEA countries and the United Kingdom (UK).
Infection control practices in children during COVID-19 pandemic: differences from adults

AUTHOR(S)
Ilker Devrim; Nuri Bayram

Published: August 2020   Journal: The American Journal of Infection Control
Limited studies have been published on practices and management of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children. Despite the fact that COVID-19 rarely caused any severe disease in children, the asymptomatic children might be playing an important role for spreading COVID-19 in healthcare facilities. This review aimed at sharing our experience of how to handle patients with COVID-19 in a pediatric referral and tertiary care hospital to prevent the possible transmissions to the healthcare workers (HCWs).
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 48 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: 933-939 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, disease control, disease transmission, infectious disease, COVID-19
Polio in Afghanistan: the current situation amid COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Attaullah Ahmadi; Mohammad Yasir Essar; Xu Lin (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Polio is a deadly viral disease that has been paralyzing many children in Afghanistan. Despite fundamental efforts, primarily vaccination, to reduce the number of cases in Afghanistan, there are still many children who are deprived of the vaccine every year. Afghanistan is one of the two remaining countries endemic for polio, and the country has undergone various challenges that have hampered the eradication of this disease. The underlying challenges include inaccessibility of unsecured areas, illiteracy, refusal, and, most recently, COVID-19. The country is in the midst of a battle against COVID-19, and polio has almost entirely been neglected.
Transmission of SARS-CoV-2: implications for infection prevention precautions
Institution: WHO
Published: July 2020
This document is an update to the scientific brief published on 29 March 2020 entitled “Modes of transmission of virus causing COVID-19: implications for infection prevention and control (IPC) precaution recommendations” and includes new scientific evidence available on transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: disease control, disease transmission, infectious disease, COVID-19 | Publisher: WHO
The role of children in transmission of SARS-CoV-2: a rapid review

AUTHOR(S)
Xue Li; Wei Xu; Marshall Dozier (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Journal of Global Health
Understanding the role of children in the transmission of SARSCoV-2 is urgently required given its policy implications in relation to the reopening of schools and intergenerational contacts. This article conducted a rapid review of studies that investigated the role of children in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. It synthesized evidence for four categories: 1) studies reporting documented cases of SARS-CoV-2 transmission by infected children; 2) studies presenting indirect evidence on the potential of SARS-CoV-2 transmission by (both symptomatic and asymptomatic) children; 3) studies reporting cluster outbreaks of COVID-19 in schools; 4) studies estimating the proportions of children infected by SARS-CoV-2, and reported results narratively
Cite this research | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, disease control, disease transmission, COVID-19
Latin America and the Caribbean Rapid gender analysis for COVID-19
Institution: CARE, UN Women
Published: June 2020
Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries have varied in their responses to the COVID-19 crisis with the majority declaring some form of a state of emergency, and adopting preventive measures to limit transmission, throughout March and April 2020. Restrictions are set to continue in several LAC countries throughout May and June, while others began loosening restrictions by the beginning of May. The LAC region has the highest levels of inequality in the world, with wide gaps in living standards across countries, regions, sectors, and socio-economic spheres. When also added to the persistent, pervasive gender inequality in the region the response to COVID-19 becomes immeasurably more complex.
A review of COVID-19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Parisa Khoshnevisasl; Mansour Sadeghzadeh; Sara Sadeghzadeh

Published: May 2020   Journal: Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics

This study gathers useful information about the virology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment with special consideration of pediatric patients. This review article helps medical caregivers to receive a quick and effective approach to deal with this disease in their practice.



Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 11 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, disease control, disease transmission, infectious disease, COVID-19, epidemiology
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.