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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of children in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Sabina Yeasmin; Rajon Banik; Sorif Hossain (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
This study aims to explore the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of children during the lockdown in Bangladesh. The paper demonstrates that large proportions of children suffered from mental health disturbances in Bangladesh during the period of lockdown. Implementation of psychological intervention strategies and improvement in house-hold financial conditions, literacy of parents, taking care of children, and job security may help in improving the psychological/mental status of children and the authors believe that the findings will be beneficial to accelerate the rate of achieving the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) linked to health status in Bangladesh.
Impact of pandemic COVID-19 on education in India

AUTHOR(S)
Pravat Kumar Jena

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Current Research
This paper highlights some measures taken by Govt. of India to provide seamless education in the country. Both the positive and negative impacts of COVID-19 on education are discussed and some fruitful suggestions are also pointed to carry out educational activities during the pandemic situation.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 12 | Issue: 7 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: educational policy, COVID-19 response, e-learning | Countries: India
The effects of online homeschooling on children, parents, and teachers of grades 1-9 during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ying Zhao; Yong Guo; Yu Xiao (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Medical Science Monitor
Beginning in the 2020 spring semester, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all school-age children in China were homeschooled via live/recorded broadcasts, online group communication, and software-based homework submission. This study assessed the effects of and proper preparation for this educational approach.
Young children's online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: Chinese parents' beliefs and attitudes

AUTHOR(S)
Chuanmei Dong; Simin Cao; Hui Li

Published: September 2020
This study surveyed 3275 Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes around young children’s online learning during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most parents (92.7%) in the study reported that their children had online learning experiences during the pandemic, and many (84.6%) spent less than a half-hour each time. The parents generally had negative beliefs about the values and benefits of online learning and preferred traditional learning in early childhood settings.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 118 | No. of pages: 9 | Topics: Education | Tags: school attendance, e-learning, lockdown, remote learning | Countries: China
Youth experiences and future needs in learning and working during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Tammy Chang; Marika Waselewski; Melissa DeJonckheere (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Adolescents and young adults have experienced significant impact as a result of COVID-19 with many schools and work places transitioning to online formats, altering procedures or closing completely. Notably, many youths are in a unique position as both employees and students. Our team was interested in understanding what has been difficult for youth in making these changes, what has worked well, and what would help them learn or work better.
The review of the international voices on the responses of the worldwide school closures policy searching during Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sardjana Orba Manullang; Erwinsyah Satria

Published: September 2020   Journal: Jurnal Iqra'
This article was to determine the voice of the international community in responding to the challenges of school closure policies during the 2019 Covid-19 pandemic. In order to understand the impacts and challenges of school closure, a series of critical searches were under taken on various online sources, for instance news updates publications , practitioners, and school reactions to unplanned global policies to obligate students learning from home.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, school attendance, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning
School lessons from the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Taylor

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This article draws on recent literature spawned by the Covid-19 outbreak, together with related research studies and a survey of 16 South African families undertaken in April 2020 at the start of the national lockdown. A qualitative case study method was adopted and telephonic interviews conducted with the main caregiver and up to two children in each family in order to understand how learning at home might be promoted.
Pros and cons of e-learning by children in rural areas during lockdown situation and ways to empower it

AUTHOR(S)
Desam Sudhakar Reddy; L. S. R. C. V. Ramesh

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Innovative technology and Research
E-learning for children in rural and remote areas during lockdown is beyond reach for many where internet facilities are poor. Since, Primary Health care of rural students remains key concern, stress on e-learning becomes prerequisite during covid-19 lockdown.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 7-9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, rural families, e-learning, lockdown | Countries: India
The new classmate: an exploration of how COVID-19 affected primary schools activities in Italy

AUTHOR(S)
Ombretta Gaggi; Agnieszka Barbara Kolasinska; Silvia Mirri (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Among all the others, one of the groups of persons most affected by the restrictions applied to contrast Corona-Virus spread is surely represented by children. In particular, closing school has been an action applied by several countries (195 at the beginning of April 2020), involving 1,600,000,000 students all over the world. In Italy, distance learning activities have been adopted all over the country, at each educational stage, but with substantial differences (i.e., in terms of modalities and digital platforms). With the aim of investigating the most adopted technologies, didactic methodologies, as well as the impact on schools population, we have involved families of more than 1,000 Italian students, asking them to fill a survey. This paper presents the analysis of the results we have obtained, focusing on a delicate group of students: the ones attending primary schools, where kids learn fundamental knowledge and basic skills.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 36-41 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: primary education, school attendance, e-learning | Countries: Italy
Women's and men's work, housework and childcare, before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Del Boca; Noemi Oggero; Paola Profeta (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
The current COVID-19 crisis further increased the workload of women, resulting from both their occupation and the housework. In contrast with men, there is no difference in the increase of housework between women who telecommute and those who do not work because of the emergency. This study shed light on a specific and crucial component of childcare: home schooling. The closure of schools has imposed a massive burden on parents, and especially on working parents. Results show that working women with young children, especially those aged 0–5, are those particularly affected, by bearing the excess burden to a higher extent. For women, the work–life balance is especially difficult to achieve when their partners keep working outside of the home during the emergency. These results may have long-term implications, and implications that are potentially negative for women, especially if both the labour market crisis and school closures persist. However, there are also some positive implications, if it means that couples are taking the opportunity of the crisis to share the burden of childcare more equally.
Reintroduction of native centric education for children in COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Osobor Ikechukwu Monday

Published: September 2020   Journal: Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health
With the current effect of globalization on cultures,it is imperative to reawaken the indigenous ways of life during this lockdown. Local centric education is the preparation of children for life to avoid cultural dislocations. It is character-based ethics and native centred philosophy, aimed at teaching and learning the indigenous ways of life
Cite this research | Vol.: 49 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: educational policy, indigenous children, school attendance, e-learning
Parental perceptions of  COVID-19 pandemic: adherence to laid down containment measures

AUTHOR(S)
Osebor Ikechukwu Monday; Ezeonwu Bertilla; Joseph Ajanwaenyi Uzoma; Uwadia Omozele (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: American Journal of Pediatrics
This article aims to ascertain, the perceptions of caregivers of children on covid-19 containment measures, the need for adherence to the measures to understand the reasons for poor compliance. The interviewees expressed their difficulties and frustrations in maintaining the rigors of application of these measures but would that government should expedite action towards the discovery of Protective vaccines because of the effect these measures had on their economic means of livelihoods.
Cite this research | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 357-361 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning
Young children’s online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes

AUTHOR(S)
Chuanmei Dong; Simin Cao; Hui Lia

Published: September 2020   Journal: Children and youth services review
This study surveyed 3275 Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes around young children’s online learning during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most parents (92.7%) in the study reported that their children had online learning experiences during the pandemic, and many (84.6%) spent less than a half-hour each time. The parents generally had negative beliefs about the values and benefits of online learning and preferred traditional learning in early childhood settings. They tended to resist and even reject online learning for three key reasons: the shortcomings of online learning, young children’s inadequate self-regulation, and their lack of time and professional knowledge in supporting children’s online learning. The results suggested that the implementation of online learning during the pandemic has been problematic and challenging for families. The Chinese parents were neither trained nor ready to embrace online learning. The paper concluded with implications for policymakers and teacher education.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 118 | Issue: nov 2020 | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: parents, school attendance, e-learning | Countries: China
Estimates of the impact of COVID-19 on learning and earnings in Indonesia: how to turn the tide

AUTHOR(S)
Noah Yarrow; Eema Masood; Rythia Afkar

Institution: The World Bank
Published: August 2020
This paper uses the World Bank’s recently developed Country Tool for Simulating COVID-19 Impacts on Learning and Schooling Outcomes and data from the forthcoming Indonesia Education Service Delivery Indicator Survey to simulate and contextualize the potential impact of COVID-19 school closures on learning outcomes, proficiency levels, enrollments and expected earnings for Indonesian students in primary and secondary school.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 29 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, educational policy, school attendance, e-learning | Countries: Indonesia
Yogic eye exercises followed by the ergonomic advice on eye fatigue in children attending online classes in COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Mujahid K. Sheikh; Rutuja Malavde; Sachin Daigavane

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of Current Research and Review
Computer use by children especially school-aged children is growing rapidly. In these decades, due to the rising use of IT, they are using computers or laptops not only for education purpose but also, for playing online games for a prolonged period. Therefore, extensive viewing of the computer screen can lead to eye discomfort, fatigue, blurred vision and headaches, dry eyes and other symptoms of eyestrain. A significant reduction was seen in eye fatigue with self- relaxing yogic eye exercises followed by the ergonomic advice in school-aged children attending online classes in COVID-19.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 12 | Issue: 17 | No. of pages: 132-136 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, e-learning, online learning
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.