CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   51     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 15 of 51
Parental stress during COVID-19: A brief report on the role of distance education and family resources in an Italian sample

AUTHOR(S)
Ughetta Moscardino; Raffaele Dicataldo; Maja Roch (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Current psychology
Since the COVID-19 outbreak, school closures have affected over 1.5 billion children worldwide. Many countries implemented a rapid transition to distance education (DE), but the effects of such transition on family life remain largely underexplored. The current study used a cross-sectional, correlational survey design to explore the role of DE and family resources (parenting selfefficacy and family functioning) in perceived stress among Italian parents of first-grade children (N = 89).
U.S. children “learning online” during COVID-19 without the internet or a computer: visualizing the gradient by race/ethnicity and parental educational attainment

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph Friedman; Hunter York; Ali H. Mokdad (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Socius
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has caused unprecedented disruptions to education in the United States, with a large proportion of schooling moving to online formats, which has the potential to exacerbate existing racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in learning. The authors visualize access to online learning technologies using data from the Household Pulse Survey from the early fall 2020 school period (August 19 to October 26). The authors find that 10.1 percent of children participating in online learning nationally did not have adequate access to the Internet and a computer. Rates of inadequate access varied nearly 20-fold across the gradient of parental race/ethnicity and education, from 1.9 percent for children of Asian parents with graduate degrees to 35.5 percent among children of Black parents with less than a high school education.
‘Homeschooling’ and the COVID-19 crisis: the insights of parents on curriculum and remote learning

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Fontenelle-Tereshchuk

Published: February 2021   Journal: Interchange
The COVID-19 crisis forced schools to temporarily close from March 2020 to June 2020, producing unpredictable changes in instructional contexts and patterns. A new concept of ‘homeschooling’ emerged which required parents to support the implementation of the curriculum through remote learning. This article is based on a case study focusing on the perceptions of experiences of ten parents of Elementary school children during the school lockdown in Alberta, Canada. Parents argue that the schools’ demands on them were unreasonable. These added to the stress of the quarantine and professional losses, and to the burden of working full-time, fulflling household responsibilities, and having children rely mostly on parents to deliver an often brief, ‘shallow’ weekly lesson plan that lacked clear expectations and reliable assessment pieces. Parents also strongly cast doubts on the popular reliability of online education by suggesting the unsuitability of online tools to promote independent learning among young children. The study may provide valuable contributions to further inform how to better support learning from home during this ongoing pandemic.
COVID-19 and the right to education in Chile: an opportunity to revisit our social contract

AUTHOR(S)
Denisse Gelber; Carolina Castillo; Luciano Alarcón (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Review of Education
The COVID-19 pandemic is pushing the world into a devastating economic and social scenario. The consequences of this crisis largely impact children and teenagers, both now and in the future. School closures have particularly affected vulnerable children, deepening the effects of their unequal socio-economic circumstances. In this context, the actions governments are taking to protect their citizens’ right to education will be crucial to reducing or exacerbating inequality in the long term. The authors of this article analyse the case of Chile, one of the most successful countries in Latin America regarding educational achievement and enrollment, as well as the most segregated educational system among member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
Adoption of e-learning during lockdown in India

AUTHOR(S)
Sandeep Kumar Mathivanan; Prabhu Jayagopal; Shakeel Ahmed (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of System Assurance Engineering and Management
Education institutions like schools, colleges, and universities in India are currently based on traditional learning methods and follow the conventional setting of face-to-face interaction/lectures in a classroom. Most of the academic sector started unified learning, still most of them struct with old steps. The unexpected Plague of a deadly infection called COVID-19 caused by (SARS-Cov-2) trembled the whole world. The WHO announced it as a disease outbreak. This circumstance challenged the whole education system worldwide and compelled educators to change to an online mode immediately. Many educational organizations that were earlier unwilling to change their traditional didactic practice had no choice but to move exclusively to online teaching–learning. This article provides an elaborate discussion about the education sector's impact during a disease outbreak in India. It offers a detailed discussion regarding how India adopts the e-learning approach in this critical situation. Further, it describes how to cope with the challenges related to e-learning.
Multilevel analysis of the educational use of technology: quantity and versatility of digital technology usage in Finnish basic education schools

AUTHOR(S)
Meri‐Tuulia Kaarakainen; Loretta Saikkonen

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Computer Assisted Learning
The adoption of technology in teaching has been identified to relate to various factors from attitudes and self‐efficacy to subjective norms and digital references. The aim of this study is to broaden the perspective to hierarchical grouping effects. Multilevel modelling of the study utilizes the data of 2355 Finnish basic education teachers. The results show that, before the coronavirus pandemic, Finnish teachers used digital devices in teaching at least once a week, on average, and many times on a daily basis, varying according to the subject being taught. The variation in teachers' technology usage occurs mainly at the individual level, with a small proportion between schools; higher‐level hierarchies proved redundant in the context of Finland. At the teacher level, digital skills, age, and digital self‐efficacy increase technology usage in teaching. At the end, the significance and limitations of the research and the direction of future research in the post‐pandemic era are discussed.
How the COVID-19 pandemic is reshaping the education service

AUTHOR(S)
Byeongwoo Kang

Published: February 2021
This chapter focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the education service, which is typically classified as a service industry in industrial classifications. Digital transformation in the education sector has attracted significant attention recently. The distance education is becoming a new normal in the education service. However, the education community in general is not ready to maximize the merits of distance learning. We need to change the role of instructors from a knowledge teacher to a learning motivator and progress manager. In addition, we need more investment in ICT infrastructure in the education service to enhance educational effects.
Facilitating emergency remote K-12 teaching in computing-enhanced virtual learning environments during COVID-19 pandemic - blessing or curse?

AUTHOR(S)
Tamar Shamir-Inbal; Ina Blau

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Educational Computing Research
This study explored teacher experience in leading Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) in K-12 and conducting blended synchronous and asynchronous instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study’s purpose was to understand the pedagogical, technological, and organizational challenges and benefits of computing-enhanced digital learning environments, and to explore teachers' pedagogical strategies. This study employed a qualitative research paradigm using nation-wide, online samples, which included 133 elementary and secondary school teachers from Hebrew-speaking and Arabic-speaking schools in Israel.
Investigating Risks and Opportunities for Children in a Digital World A rapid review of the evidence on children’s internet use and outcomes

AUTHOR(S)
Mariya Stoilova; Sonia Livingstone; Rana Khazbak

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: January 2021

Children’s lives are increasingly mediated by digital technologies. Yet, when it comes to understanding the long-term effects of internet use and online experiences on their well-being, mental health or resilience, the best we can do is make an educated guess. Our need for this knowledge has become even more acute as internet use rises during COVID-19. This report explores what has been learned from the latest research about children’s experiences and outcomes relating to the internet and digital technologies. It aims to inform policy-makers, educators, child-protection specialists, industry and parents on the best evidence, and it proposes a future research agenda.

Profiling teachers' readiness for online teaching and learning in higher education: who's ready?

AUTHOR(S)
Ronny Scherer; Sarah K. Howard; Jo Tondeur (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Computers in Human Behavior
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced a shift to online teaching and learning (OTL) in colleges and universities across the globe, requiring teachers to adapt their teaching in a very short time—independent of whether they were prepared. Drawing from an international sample of N =739 higher education teachers in 58 countries, the present study sheds light on teachers’ readiness for OTL at the time of the pandemic by (a) identifying teacher profiles based on a set of key dimensions of readiness; (b) explaining profile membership by individual teacher characteristics, contextual aspects of the shift to OTL, and country-level indicators representing educational innovation and cultural orientation. We conducted latent profile analysis and identified three teacher profiles with consistently high or low readiness or an inconsistent readiness profile—hence, teachers in higher education are not a homogeneous group
We’re all teachers now: remote learning during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Dick Carpenter; Joshua Dunn

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of School Choice
This study examined educational experiences of families under COVID and their schooling decisions in the 2021 school year. Results from a survey of 1743 parents indicate most schools provided educational resources ranging from hardcopy packets to live online instruction. Parents were generally positive about the experience. Parents in private and charter schools reported a more positive experience than those in traditional public schools. Only a small percentage of respondents said they were going to homeschool in fall 2020, but more than a third planned to send their child to a virtual school out of concern about their child’s health.
Building systemic resilience in school systems: the way forward
Institution: HEAD Foundation, Asian Development Bank
Published: January 2021

This policy brief proposes reforms in primary and secondary education as developing Asia copes with the impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). It explores blended learning modalities that can be applied beyond the pandemic.

Reopening schools in Latin America and the Caribbean: key points, challenges, and dilemmas to plan a safe return to in-person classes
Institution: UNESCO
Published: January 2021

The  suspension  of  in-person  classes  as  a  consequence  of  the  COVID-19  pandemic  profoundly  affected  the  education  systems  in  Latin  America  and  the  Caribbean  (LAC) and compromised the achievements reached around the goals established in the SDG4-Education 2030 Agenda. This report analyzes the possibilities, restrictions and needs that the countries of the region will face during the process of returning to in-person classes, considering five dimensions:  (i)  safe  schools  (school  infrastructure,  access  to  water  and  sanitation);  (ii)  human  resources  (principals  and  teachers);  (iii)  access  to  ITC  and  connectivity;  (iv) education financing and (v) information and planning.


Academics' and students' experiences in a Chilean dental school during the COVID‐19 pandemic: a qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Diego Prieto Prieto; Jorge Tricio; Felipe Cáceres (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: European Journal of Dental Education
The quick spread of COVID‐19 has caused part of the world's population to adopt quarantine protocols that have limited professional activities, including dental training programmes. This study aimed to explore the experiences of students and personnel at a Chilean dental school during the COVID‐19 pandemic.
Lessons for child–computer interaction studies following the research challenges during the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Natalia Kucirkova; Cecilie Evertsen-Stanghelle; Ingunn Studsrød (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction
The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has been experienced differently in and within individual countries and thus has had a different impact on the individual researchers in the child–computer interaction studies. There were several challenges that our research group experienced during the pandemic period, with a rapid transition to digital working conditions and a society managing altered living conditions. The changes happened on all levels of the society, and they affected our key participants — children, teachers, designers of children’s digital books and publishers. In this Viewpoint article the lessons learnt from the changes in our study designs and data collection processes due to lockdown and other restrictions related to the pandemic have been highlighted.
1 - 15 of 51

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.