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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Cybervictimization and well-being among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: The mediating roles of emotional self-efficacy and emotion regulation

AUTHOR(S)
Fabian Schunk; Franziska Zeh; Gisela Trommsdorff

Published: October 2021   Journal: Computers in Human Behavior
Cybervictimization has been linked to adverse psychological consequences but little is known about the mechanisms linking cybervictimization to lower well-being. Two studies examined emotional self-efficacy and distinct emotion regulation strategies as potential mediators in the relationship between cybervictimization and lower well-being among German adolescents during the school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020. In Study 1, 107 adolescents (Mage = 15.76) reported their cybervictimization frequency, emotional self-efficacy beliefs, and aspects of well-being (i.e., self-esteem, perceived social support, and subjective well-being during the COVID-19 related school closures). Emotional self-efficacy mediated the link between cybervictimization and all well-being measures. Specifically, cybervictimization was related to lower well-being through lower self-efficacy for managing negative emotions. For further examination, in Study 2, 205 adolescents (Mage = 15.45) were asked to report their cybervictimization experiences, use of specific emotion regulation strategies (rumination, reappraisal, and suppression), and well-being (i.e., self-esteem and life satisfaction).
Adolescent emotion scale for online lessons: a study from Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
M. Betul Yilmaz; Feza Orhan; S. Gonca Zeren

Published: September 2021   Journal: Education and Information Technologies
People’s day-to-day routines have changed drastically since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the changes to take place has been the transition to online learning due to the changing conditions in learning environments. One of the factors that guide students through learning environments is their emotions. The few existing scales that measure the emotions of adolescents in learning environments have been developed with consideration of face-to-face learning environments and their items do not adequately express the state of online environments. For this reason, this study aimed to develop a scale which reveals the emotions of adolescents that may affect their academic success with regard to this transition of learning environments as they attend online lessons.
Reduced emotional intelligence in children aged 9–10 caused by the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Katya Martín-Requejo; Sandra Santiago-Ramajo

Published: September 2021   Journal: Mind, Brain, and Education
It is necessary to know the influence of the current pandemic situation on children's emotional intelligence (EI). Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the difference in 34 Spanish children's EI (aged 9–10) caused by the lockdown. EI was measured with the BarOn Emotional Intelligence Inventory (EQ-i:YV). Results have revealed a reduction in EI, specifically on intrapersonal, interpersonal, and adaptability scales (all p < .01). Thus, the study highlights the negative influence of lockdown situation on children's EI and considering the impact this may have at a cognitive, social, or academic level, it would be convenient to promote its development at school.
Predicting negative and positive affect during COVID-19: a daily diary study in youths

AUTHOR(S)
Wisteria Deng; Reuma Gadassi Polack; Mackenzie Creighton (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Journal of Research on Adolescence:
The COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to profoundly affect youths’ mental health. Understanding predictors of affective responding to the pandemic is critical for prevention and intervention efforts. This study examines emotion regulation as an important predictor of youth’s changes in positive and negative affect. The present study of 115 participants (62 girls, Mage = 11.77) explores the relation between pre-existing emotion regulation strategies, as measured by multi-week daily diaries pre-COVID, and youths’ mean positive and negative affect levels and variability during a 28-day period amidst the pandemic, while including COVID-related worries and isolation as important moderators. The findings provide important insight into interactions between pre-existing vulnerabilities and COVID-related stressors in predicting affective adjustment in youth.
Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on behavioral and emotional aspects and daily routines of Arab Israeli children

AUTHOR(S)
Rafat Ghanamah; Hazar Eghbaria-Ghanamah

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Negative psychological effects of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been identified in adults and children, such as anxiety and sleep disorders. However, research about the impact of this pandemic on children from ethnical minorities is scarce. We tested the effects of COVID-19 outbreak on psychological aspects and daily routines among Arab Israeli Children. An online crosssectional survey was conducted among Arab Israeli parents, including behavioral and emotional aspects questionnaire and questions addressing using of screens, sleep, and physical activities.
Emotional cartography as a window into children's well-being: visualizing the felt geographies of place

AUTHOR(S)
Andrew Steger; Elly Evans; Bryan Wee

Published: March 2021   Journal: Emotion, Space and Society

More often than not, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) excludes emotion and qualitative analysis from studies of people-place relationships in favor of quantitative approaches. This study employs emotional cartography as a form of qualitative GIS (qualGIS) to elevate emotions from the periphery to the center of dialogue about children's well-being. It highlights the ontological parallels between qualGIS, emotional cartography and children in society, and advance emotion maps as a way to visualize different spatial and emotional realities. In reflecting upon the felt geography of our own childhood places, we affirm the importance of children's emotional attachments to places as well as the centrality of ‘messy’ human experiences in GIS. To conclude, this paper discusses the implications of emotional cartography for researchers, planners and GIS, paying special attention to children's well-being amidst the current COVID-19 pandemic. In particular, this includes a call to ‘witness’ and to foster spatial empathy among those advocating for children.



Impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the well‐being of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their parents

AUTHOR(S)
Anne Masi; Antonio Mendoza Diaz; Lucy Tully (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
This study aims to examine the impact of COVID‐19 pandemic on child mental health and socio‐emotional and physical well‐being (including sleep, diet, exercise, use of electronic media; care giver perceptions of symptoms of child neurodevelopmental disability [NDD] and comorbidities), and care giver mental health and well‐being, social support and service use.
A predictable home environment may protect child mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Laura M. Glynn; Elysia Poggi Davis; Joan L. Luby (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Neurobiology of Stress

Information about the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescent and adult mental health is growing, yet the impacts on preschool children are only emerging. Importantly, environmental factors that augment or protect from the multidimensional and stressful influences of the pandemic on emotional development of young children are poorly understood. Depressive symptoms in 169 preschool children (mean age 4.1 years) were assessed with the Preschool Feelings Checklist during a state-wide stay-at-home order in Southern California. Mothers (46% Latinx) also reported on externalizing behaviors with the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire. To assess the role of environmental factors in child mental health we examined household income, food insecurity, parental essential worker status and loss of parental job, as well as preservation of the structure of children's daily experiences with the Family Routines Inventory.

Mindfulness training on the resilience of adolescents under the COVID-19 epidemic: a latent growth curve analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Yue Yuan

Published: January 2021   Journal: Personality and Individual Differences
As a preventive measure during the COVID-19 epidemic, we have had to stay at home for a long time. The lifestyle of adolescents has undergone severe changes. Almost every school started online education for the first time. Some adolescents have shown low resilience when faced with these changes. Most previous research has focused on mindfulness training and resilience by using cross-sectional or two-point tracking designs. However, little is known about the developmental trajectories of the impact of mindfulness training on resilience, particularly during this epidemic. Therefore, this study aims to explore how the developmental trajectories of resilience are impacted by mindfulness training.
Considerations for educators in supporting student learning in the midst of COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Marlena L. Minkos; Nicholas W. Gelbar

Published: November 2020   Journal: Psychology in the Schools
COVID‐19 has presented a period of unprecedented challenge for schools in the United States. Thousands of school buildings across the country were closed in the spring of 2020 through the end of the school year to slow the spread of the global pandemic. Plans to reopen schools in many states remain uncertain as the virus continues to spread across communities. Current and future challenges are complex, with significant impacts on the global economy, health care system, and overall well‐being. When schools reopen, students will present with a wide variety of academic and social‐emotional needs, and schools will need to mindfully adjust systems and practices to meet the needs of their unique student population. This paper provides educators with suggestions on how to adapt existing multitiered systems of support using a trauma‐informed lens to support students during this unusual time.
Emotion regulation skills in children during the COVID-19 pandemic: influences on specific parenting and child adjustment

AUTHOR(S)
Beatriz Domínguez-Álvarez; Laura López-Romero; José Antonio Gómez-Fraguela (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Revista de Psicología Clínica con Niños y Adolescentes
Child emotion regulation (ER) skills and specific parenting practices during the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to influence children adjustment in these unprecedented times. On this assumption, this study aimed to examine the predictive value of ER skills in relation to diverse indicators of behavioral and socio-emotional adjustment. Then, it tested whether some of these associations could be partially explained through the mediator role of the specific parenting practices displayed within the pandemic context. These hypotheses were tested considering the previous levels of child reactivity as a potential moderator of the examined relations.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.