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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 605
A mother's perspective of consent for maternal and neonatal COVID-19 testing: can we do more?

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Anne East; Sunitha Ramaiah; Kimberley Morris

Published: June 2022   Journal: British Journal of Midwifery

There is ongoing research on the effects of COVID-19 on pregnancy and whether vertical viral transmission occurs. This study aimed to determine maternal opinions of COVID-19 testing for pregnant women and newborns in order to influence future clinical practice while advancing global knowledge of the impact of testing on patient experiences. This service evaluation assessed the opinions of 292 pregnant women who were tested for COVID-19 along with their newborn babies using nasopharyngeal swabs and the SARS-CoV-2 reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test between 28 April and 21 May 2020.

Attitude and acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine in parents and adolescents: a nationwide survey

AUTHOR(S)
Hyunju Lee; Young June Choe; Shinkyeong Kim (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines are currently authorized for emergency use in adolescents aged 12–17 years; however, there is concern and uncertainty regarding the safety and necessity of COVID-19 vaccination. A survey was carried out to assess the attitudes and acceptance towards vaccination in adolescents. A nationwide web-based survey was conducted among adolescents aged 12–17 years and their parents between June 29 and July 8, 2021 on a platform provided by the Ministry of Education.
COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among US parents: a nationally representative survey

AUTHOR(S)
E. Adrianne Hammershaimb; Lyndsey D. Cole; Yuanyuan Liang (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

Little was known about US parental attitudes, beliefs, and intentions surrounding coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines for children before their introduction. This is an online cross-sectional nationally representative survey of US parents/guardians of children < 18 years old via Ipsos KnowledgePanel, fielded from October 26, 2021 to November 30, 2021.

Factors influencing hesitancy towards adult and child COVID-19 vaccines in rural and urban West Africa: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Sylvain Landry B. Faye; Ralf Krumkamp; Seydou Doumbia (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: BMJ Open

This study aims: (1) to identify and describe similarities and differences in both adult and child COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and (2) to examine sociodemographic, perception-related and behavioural factors influencing vaccine hesitancy across five West African countries.  4198 individuals from urban and rural settings in Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Senegal and Sierra Leone participated in the survey.

Long COVID in children and young people: uncertainty and contradictions

AUTHOR(S)
Carolyn A. Chew-Graham; Tracy A. Briggs; Binita Kane

Published: June 2022   Journal: British Journal of General Practice

‘Long COVID’ describes both ongoing symptomatic COVID-19 (5–12 weeks after onset) and post-COVID-19 syndrome (≥12 weeks after onset). Long COVID is also a patient-preferred term so will be used throughout this editorial to describe symptoms lasting ≥4 weeks after an acute episode of COVID-19. As the phenomenon of long COVID emerged and came to be recognised, including with the publication of the guideline by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network, and the Royal College of General Practitioners, there was still limited evidence about whether children and young people could suffer with prolonged symptoms following an acute COVID-19 infection. The general opinion was still that SARS-CoV-2 was a mild infection in the young.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 72 | Issue: 719 | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, child health, COVID-19, infectious disease, pandemic, respiratory diseases | Countries: United Kingdom
Can high school students check the veracity of information about COVID-19? A case study on critical media literacy in Brazilian ESL classes

AUTHOR(S)
Karin Paola Meyrer; Dorotea Frank Kersch

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of Media Literacy Education
In a globalized world, critical media literacy is imperative when selecting the content we consume amid countless offers. Therefore, the purpose of this case study is to analyze which resources 3rd year high school students (16-17 years old) from an English as a Second Language class in Brazil use in the construction of authorial journalistic articles demystifying fake news about COVID-19 and if the interventions conducted previous to the task were helpful in their process of developing critical media literacy. To this end, firstly students analyzed news about COVID-19 from international websites; secondly, they discussed aspects of a video that circulated widely in WhatsApp chat groups; and, finally, they produced journalistic articles demystifying popular fake news about COVID-19 in Brazil.
A socio-ecological perspective on parents' intentions to vaccinate their children against COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Laura M. Canaday; Jessica D. Resnick; Hsuan Liu (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Vaccine
From 2013 to 2016, the H1N1 component of live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) performed very poorly in contrast to the inactivated influenza vaccine. We utilized a primary, differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNEC) culture system to assess the replication differences between isogenic LAIVs containing the HA segment from either A/Bolivia/559/2013 (rBol), which showed poor vaccine efficacy, and A/Slovenia/2903/2015 (rSlov), which had reasonable vaccine efficacy. There were minimal differences in infectious virus production in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, but the rSlov LAIV showed markedly improved replication in hNEC cultures at both 32 °C and 37 °C, demonstrating that the HA segment alone could impact LAIV replication in physiologically relevant systems.
Association of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy with incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in infants.

AUTHOR(S)
Ellen Øen Carlsen; Maria C. Magnus; Laura Oakley (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: JAMA Internal Medicine

Pregnant women are recommended to receive COVID-19 vaccination to reduce risk of severe COVID-19. Whether vaccination during pregnancy also provides passive protection to infants after birth remains unclear. This study aimed to determine whether COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy was associated with reduced risk of COVID-19 in infants up to age 4 months during COVID-19 pandemic periods dominated by Delta and Omicron variants. This nationwide, register-based cohort study included all live-born infants born in Norway between September 1, 2021, and February 28, 2022.

Hearing outcomes of infants born to mothers with active COVID-19 infection

AUTHOR(S)
Panagiota Kosmidou; Ioannis Karamatzanis; Sotiris Tzifas (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Medical Journeys

COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a highly contagious respiratory tract infection. A major concern of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women is vertical maternal-fetal transmission and the ramifications on infant hearing. This retrospective study aims to investigate whether perinatal exposure to SARS-CoV-2 has an impact on the hearing of the offspring. The study population included neonates born to unvaccinated COVID-19 positive mothers in the University Hospital of Patras, Greece from March 2020 to January 2021. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were performed on the neonates on the first, second,, and seventh day of life. All neonates underwent transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) within the first three months of life and were all examined at the age of nine months.

Perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine incentives among adolescents and young adults.

AUTHOR(S)
Caroline M. Hogan; Marika E. Waselewski; Parker Szachta (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: JAMA Network Open

Vaccine incentives have been used across the US to encourage COVID-19 vaccine uptake and include programs targeted to adolescents and young adults. However, little is known about youths’ views regarding these initiatives. To assess experiences and perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine incentives in a nationwide sample of US youth. A qualitative survey study was conducted using the MyVoice text message-based polling platform from October 22 to October 29, 2021. Participants were US adolescents and young adults aged 14 to 24 years, who were sent 5 open-ended questions to assess their experiences and perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine incentives. Qualitative responses were analyzed thematically. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed in January 2022.

Recommending COVID-19 vaccination for adolescents in primary care.

AUTHOR(S)
Peyton Thompson; Lauren McCormick; Qian Huang (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Family Practice

COVID-19 vaccines are available for adolescents in the United States, but many parents are hesitant to have their children vaccinated. The advice of primary care professionals strongly influences vaccine uptake. We examined the willingness of primary care professionals (PCPs) to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for adolescents. Participants were a national sample of 1,047 US adolescent primary care professionals. They participated in an online survey in early 2021, after a COVID-19 vaccine had been approved for adults but before approval for adolescents. Respondents included physicians (71%), advanced practice providers (17%), and nurses (12%).

Covid-19 mortality in children and adolescents in Mexico

AUTHOR(S)
Dalia Stern; Eduardo Arias-de la Garza; María Teresa García-Romero (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Salud Pública de México
This study aimed to estimate Covid-19 and pre-pandemic low respiratory infection (LRI) mortality in children and adolescents in Mexico. Materials and methods. It estimated the percentage of total mortality attributable to Covid-19 (95% confidence intervals; 95%CI) and made the corresponding estimates for pre-pandemic LRI mortality.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 64 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, child health, child mortality, COVID-19, infectious disease, pandemic | Countries: Mexico
Long COVID-19 in children: an Italian cohort study.

AUTHOR(S)
Gianfranco Trapani; Giuseppe Verlato; Enrico Bertino (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics

Long COVID-19 syndrome is a complex of symptoms that occurs after the acute SARS-CoV-2 infection, in the absence of other possible diagnoses. Studies on Long COVID-19 in pediatric population are scanty and heterogeneous in design, inclusion criteria, outcomes, and follow-up time. The objective of the present study is to assess the prevalence of Long COVID-19 syndrome in a cohort of Italian pediatric primary care patients, observed for a period of time of 8 to 36 weeks from healing. Prevalence was also assessed in a cohort of pediatric patients hospitalized during acute infection. Data concerning 629 primary care patients with previous acute SARS-CoV-2 infection were collected by a questionnaire filled in by Primary Care Pediatrician (PCP). The questionnaire was administrated to patients by 18 PCPs based in 8 different Italian regions from June to August 2021. Data concerning 60 hospitalized patients were also collected by consultation of clinical documents.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, infectious disease, pandemic, respiratory diseases | Countries: Italy
Impact of a focus education in Zoom on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Hong Kong parents of the preschoolers

AUTHOR(S)
Wilfred Hing-sang Wong; Hung-kwan So; Jaime S. Rosa Duque (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Parental vaccine hesitancy is a major barrier to achieving high vaccination uptake among children, particularly in young children during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Developing herd immunity is a critical concept for overcoming the current pandemic. The purpose of this study is to reduce parental vaccine hesitancy through a focused educational seminar in ZOOM and to empower parents who are concerned about vaccinating their children to communicate with medical experts during live seminars. Parents of preschoolers, teachers, and kindergarten principals from three local pre-school education and services associations attended live seminars. After attending seminars, parental willingness to vaccinate their children increased by 65%. The live Zoom seminar led by medical experts resulted in a decrease in vaccine hesitancy. Our findings support the creation of seminars that allow clients and medical specialists to communicate directly with one another. Offering an open and honest forum for people to express their concerns to medical experts could be a useful strategy for dealing with not only vaccination apprehension, but also other health-related emergencies.
Household and social characteristics associated with COVID-19 vaccine intent among Latino families in the San Francisco Bay Area

AUTHOR(S)
Janet M. Wojcicki; Milagro Escobar; Andrea DeCastro Mendez

Published: June 2022   Journal: BMC Infectious Diseases

Latinos have had higher case counts, hospitalization rates and deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic nationally and in the state of California. Meanwhile, Latino vaccination rates remain lower than those of non-Hispanic Whites. COVID-19 vaccine nonintent, defined as intent to not vaccinate against COVID-19, among Latino individuals continues to be an issue in the state of California. Families from three Latino longitudinal mother–child cohorts previously recruited in the San Francisco Bay Area were surveyed telephonically from February to June 2021 to assess attitudes towards vaccination against COVID-19 and prior vaccination, in general, for themselves and their children. Risk for vaccine nonintent was assessed using the Mann–Whitney rank sum non-parametric test for continuous predictors and chi-squared tests for categorical ones.

31 - 45 of 605

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.