search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   62     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 15 of 62
Effect of COVID-19 lockdown on refractive errors in Italian children aged 5-12 years: a multi-center retrospective study.

AUTHOR(S)
Edoardo Trovato Battagliola; Pietro Mangiantini; Mattia D’Andrea (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: European Journal of Ophthalmology

This study aims to explore the potential consequences of the COVID-19 lockdown on the prevalence of myopia among Italian children aged 5–12 years.It is a retrospective multicenter study conducted in Italy. Population: children aged 5–12. Selection: random selection of children who received an eye exam between 2016 to 2021. Inclusion criteria: healthy children presenting for a routine eye exam. Exclusion criteria: presence of ocular comorbidities other than refractive error, such as blepharoptosis, media opacities, corneal or retinal dystrophies, strabismus, amblyopia, or concurrent therapy with atropine 0.01%.

An empirical study on the factors influencing users' continuance intention of using online learning platforms for secondary school students by big data analytics

AUTHOR(S)
Guomin Chen; Cao Shuo; Pengrun Chen (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Mobile Information Systems
During the new coronavirus epidemic in 2020, the number of online learning platform users grew explosively, with secondary school students becoming the main group of online learning platform users. Especially the virtual clinical learning environment of online learning platform for secondary school students, as one of the main factors affecting users’ sustained use, has become an important issue companies and researchers are faced with. This paper, taking secondary school student users as the research object, constructed a model of factors influencing users’ intention to continuously use the online learning platform for secondary school students. The model, based on TAM model and ECM model, consisted of 10 variables, including TP-Teaching presence, resource quality, system quality, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, academic identity, self-efficacy, users’ satisfaction, teacher-student relationship, and behavioral intention.
Excess google searches for child abuse and intimate partner violence during the COVID-19 pandemic: infoveillance approach

AUTHOR(S)
Corinne A. Riddell; Krista Neumann; N. Jeanie Santaularia (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Journal of Medical Internet Research

The COVID-19 pandemic has created environments with increased risk factors for household violence, such as unemployment and financial uncertainty. At the same time, it led to the introduction of policies to mitigate financial uncertainty. Further, it hindered traditional measurements of household violence. Using an infoveillance approach, our goal was to determine if there were excess Google searches related to exposure to child abuse, intimate partner violence (IPV), and child-witnessed IPV during the COVID-19 pandemic and if any excesses are temporally related to shelter-in-place and economic policies.

Changes and correlates of screen time in adults and children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Mike Trott; Robin Driscoll; Enrico Irlado (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: eClinicalMedicine.

Screen time has increased as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and several correlates have been associated with these increases. These changes, however, have not been aggregated. It was the aim of this review to (a) aggregate changes in screen time in adults and children, and (b) report on variables in relation to screen time during the COVID-19 pandemic. A systematic review of major databases was undertaken for studies published from inception to 06/12/2021, using a pre-published protocol (PROSPERO ID: CRD42021261422). Studies reporting (a) screen time pre-versus-during the pandemic, (b) screen time percentage change, or (c) correlates of screen time during the pandemic were included. A random effects meta-analysis was undertaken with subgroup analysis by age group and type of screen time.

Social media and online digital technology use among muslim young people and parents: qualitative focus group study.

AUTHOR(S)
Caitlin H. Douglass; Aidan Borthwick; Megan S. C. Lim (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting

Digital technology and social media use are common among young people in Australia and worldwide. Research suggests that young people have both positive and negative experiences online, but we know little about the experiences of Muslim communities. This study aims to explore the positive and negative experiences of digital technology and social media use among young people and parents from Muslim backgrounds in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. This study involved a partnership between researchers and a not-for-profit organization that work with culturally and linguistically diverse communities. We adopted a participatory and qualitative approach and designed the research in consultation with young people from Muslim backgrounds. Data were collected through in-person and online focus groups with 33 young people aged 16-22 years and 15 parents aged 40-57 years. Data were thematically analyzed.

Caregivers’ psychological distress, technology use, and parenting: the importance of a multidimensional perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Jasmine Zhang; Sheri Madigan; Dillon Browne (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Computers in Human Behavior
In the interconnected family context, caregivers' digital media use holds important implications for children's developmental outcomes via parent-child relationships. This may be particularly salient during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, when caregivers were more reliant on technology than ever before. This study examined caregivers' psychological well-being, digital media use, and parenting practices, with a particular focus on specific aspects of media use. Caregivers (n = 549) with at least two children aged 5–18 participated in a multinational project examining family functioning and well-being amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Parents completed questionnaires assessing their psychological distress, media use habits, and parenting practices. Comparisons of structural regression models revealed that operationalizing caregivers' media use as a single general construct disregards important nuances in its relations to psychological distress and parenting.
The relationship between internet addiction and aggressive behavior among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: anxiety as a mediator

AUTHOR(S)
Yifan Zhang; Zhe Hou; Song Wu (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Acta Psychologica
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented challenges for adolescents, who tended to experience more emotional instability, impulsivity, and aggressive behavior driven by the fear of infection and the uncertainty of network information. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between Internet addiction and aggressive behavior, and the mediating effects of depression and anxiety. There were differences in Internete addiction and aggressive behavior in gender, thus the moderating role of gender between them were explored. A total of 1148 middle school students were invited to complete the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Internet Addition Scale, the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and the Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) separately.
YouTube as a source of educational content in teenagers' learning practices

AUTHOR(S)
Zinaida Adelhardt; Thomas Eberle

Published: April 2022   Journal: European Conference on Social Media Section
Usage of YouTube for educational purposes became particularly relevant for teenagers as a support for their home-schooling. This study aimed to find out what strategies teenagers use to find relevant educational content on the service and how important this content was for their everyday learning practices before and during the COVID pandemic. It analyzed online behavior of 34, 14 to 15-year old teenagers (47% male) who took part in a long-term adventure trip with digital media left aside. It gathered quantitative data seven months before the trip (March 2019), just before the trip (October 2019), on the last day of the trip (April 2020), and five months after the trip (September 2020). It also conducted in-depth interviews with nine teenagers, who named YouTube as their favourite online service. Our intention is now to conduct nine additional interviews with the same teenagers to see whether their everyday learning practices changed within the last year. Implications drawn from this study, further research perspectives, and limitations will be presented and discussed.
Relationship of internet addiction and online gaming with peer pressure personality, general health among adolescents and young adults during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kavya Sree; Vijendra Nath Pathak

Published: April 2022   Journal: The International Journal of Health Sciences
The present study has been done to understand the relationship of internet addiction and online gaming with peer pressure, personality and general health between adolescents and young adults. The objective of this study is to find if there is any relationship between internet net addiction and online gaming with peer pressure openness to change and general health along with levels of internet addiction among young adults and adolescents. Method: correlational design was used.  The sample consisted of a total of 155 subjects with adolescents (75) and young adults (80) within the age group of 14-25 years old out of which 82 are females and 73 were males. Data was collected mostly from school, college, and working groups, through the Simple Random Sampling technique.
An analysis of parents' perceptions about using smart gadgets by pre-school students during pandemic-19

AUTHOR(S)
Iqra Almas; Muhammad Salman Abbas; Abdul Waheed

Published: April 2022   Journal: JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
This research examines the implementation of technology-based learning, such as the use of android, personal computers, and IPads. The action of this research is the use of digital technology for early childhood on the role of parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. This method was chosen because the researcher wanted to identify the parents' responses through a questionnaire on the use of technology as well as some of the roles of parents towards their children during taking advantage of this technology. That way, the survey method is considered very suitable to be used and in line with the function of survey research, namely to collect and explain opinions or opinions from a group of people (samples) on a particular topic. The number of samples in this study was 385 respondents (parents). The simple random technique is the sampling technique of choice used by researchers in sampling. Location research is Bahawalpur City. This research data was obtained online through the google forms platform. The instrument used is a questionnaire regarding the use of technology through the role of parents. The statements in this research questionnaire are 10 statements. There are five Likert scales used, namely very often (5), often (4), sometimes (3), never (2), and never (1).
Single-session, internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy to improve parenting skills to help children cope with anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic: feasibility study

AUTHOR(S)
Tarja Korpilahti-Leino; Terhi Luntamo; Terja Ristkari (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Medical Internet Research

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major impact on families’ daily routines and psychosocial well-being, and technology has played a key role in providing socially distanced health care services. The first objective of this paper was to describe the content and delivery of a single-session, internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) intervention, which has been developed to help parents cope with children’s anxiety and manage daily situations with their children. The second objective was to report user adherence and satisfaction among the first participants who completed the intervention.

Problematic Internet use and academic engagement during the COVID-19 lockdown: The indirect effects of depression, anxiety, and insomnia in early, middle, and late adolescence

AUTHOR(S)
Sihan Liu; Shengqi Zou; Di Zhang (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of affective disorders

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the transition of online learning introduces challenges for adolescents to engage in learning. The increased access and persistent Internet use could heighten the risk of problematic Internet use (PIU) that has been increasingly recognized as a risk factor for academic engagement. This study aims to investigate the direct and indirect relationships between PIU and academic engagement through psychopathological symptoms (i.e., depression, anxiety, insomnia) in early, middle, and late adolescence. In all, 4852 adolescents (51.5% females; Mage = 13.80 ± 2.38) from different regions of Chinese mainland participated in the study and completed questionnaires.

Predictors of ‘problematic internet use’ among adolescents and adults amid the pandemic in India

AUTHOR(S)
Shweta Singh; Manjistha Datta; Pawan Gupta (et al.)

Published: March 2022   Journal: Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health

Globally, problematic internet use (PIU) is acknowledged as a significant behavioural problem in adolescents and youth. It is being researched for further clarity as an independent behavioural disorder. It is crucial to explore predictors of PIU to understand the high-risk psychosocial indicators of problematic internet use, particularly amid the COVID-19 pandemic in India. The present study aimed at studying age, gender, mental health, coping strategies and lifestyle indicators as predictors for PIU in adolescents, young adults and middle-aged adults.

Screen media use and sleep patterns in Spanish adolescents during the lockdown of the coronavirus pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Marta Moraleda-Cibrián; Javier Albares-Tendero; Gonzalo Pin-Arboledas

Published: January 2022   Journal: Sleep and Breathing

The aim of this study was to investigate screen media use and sleep patterns among Spanish adolescents during the lockdown (LD) of the first peak of the coronavirus pandemic. Cross-sectional community-based study of adolescents aged 11–18 years. An online questionnaire with queries about screen time, sleep, and other healthy habits was completed by parents or guardians.

Tackling digital exclusion among disadvantaged adolescents in Jordan: what difference does access to devices and online platforms make?

AUTHOR(S)
Nicola Jones; Taghreed Alabadi; Sarah Alheiwidi (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: January 2022

Recognition that access to digital connectivity, tools and services is fundamental to inclusion and participation in society has grown exponentially over the last five years, including for persons affected by forced displacement and socially disadvantaged young people. This report presents findings from a rapid qualitative research assessment of UNICEF Jordan’s digital inclusion programme for vulnerable Jordanians, Palestinian and Syrian refugees attending Makani centres undertaken in July and August 2021. The programme distributed tablets and 10GB of monthly data to 10,000 vulnerable households in order to help address the digital divide and support access to online education and learning as well to life skills and other non-formal education programming. Drawing on in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with adolescents and their parents, this report explores the effects that the tablet distribution initiative has had in terms of education and learning, access to information and services, as well as to peers and mentors.

1 - 15 of 62

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

The second digest discussed children and violence during the pandemic.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.