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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 3365
Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on stress and access to services for licensed and kinship caregivers and youth in foster care

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah J. Beal; Katie Nause; Mary V. Greiner

Published: July 2022   Journal: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
Children in foster care in the United States face unique challenges related to access to health and education services. With the COVID-19 pandemic, many of those services were temporarily disrupted, adding burden to an already strained system. This observational study describes the experiences of licensed and kinship caregivers (N = 186) during the peak of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders and as restrictions to services were lifted, to understand the overall impact of COVID-19 on this already vulnerable population. Purposive sampling methods were used, where caregivers known to have received placement of children prior to, during, and following COVID-19 stay-at-home orders were identified and recruited to complete a 45-minute phone-administered survey assessing stress, risks for contracting COVID-19, strain resulting from COVID-19, and access to services for children in foster care in their care across five domains: healthcare, mental health, education, child welfare, and family visitation. Differences by caregiver type (licensed, kinship) and timing in the pandemic were examined.
Nowcasting impact of COVID-19 on multidimensional child poverty

AUTHOR(S)
Olivera Fiala; Aristide Kielem; Enrique Delamónica (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Statistical Journal of the IAOS
From the onset, it was clear that the impact of the global economic and social crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic was unlikely to affect all children equally. Thus, it was necessary to ascertain the impact of COVID-19 on child poverty as the events unfolded. Many of the indirect effects of the pandemic – disruptions to health services, delayed vaccination programmes, widespread school closures, and increases in food insecurity – have significant impacts on the realisation of children’s rights and, consequently, were expected to increase material deprivations across different dimensions. The question was by how much? In this article we explain the modelling and methodological approach to project or nowcast the answer to that question. The method is dynamic as it was revised as additional information emerged during 2020 and 2021.
Parents as partners in education during COVID-19-related school closures in England: challenges and opportunities identified by parents with Pakistani and Bangladeshi heritage

AUTHOR(S)
Aliya Khalid; Nidhi Singal

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Studies
Educational disruptions during COVID-19 in periods of lockdown have redirected attention to homes and parents as key partners in schooling. Educational literature explores multidimensional disadvantages faced by communities in England. COVID-associated school closures changed the relationship between school and home. Parents and family played an important role to provide support for their children’s education. There is little reflection on the experiences of parenting during this time of uncertainty. The paper focuses on the parenting experiences of Bangladeshi and Pakistani families with GCSE years children (years 7-11) in supporting their children’s education during periods of abrupt school closures. Qualitative data were collected during the third national lockdown from 19-families in England using semi-structured narrative interviews.
Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on young children with feeding and eating problems and disorders and their families

AUTHOR(S)
Hilde Krom; Joost van Mameren; Lianne Remijn (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

The incidence of feeding and eating problems and disorders (FEPD) in children increased during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on young children with FEPD and their parents. Cross-sectional survey: parents of children with FEPD (0-11 years) in the Netherlands completed an online questionnaire (January-April 2021). This questionnaire included 4 demographic questions (including criteria of Pediatric Feeding Disorder (PFD) and/or Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID)) and 11 questions related to experienced impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Parental responses regarding children with FEPD (including PFD and ARFID) were compared to those of healthy controls (HC).

COVID-19 and the Rohingya revugees in Bangladesh: socioeconomic and health impacts on women and adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Bezon Kumar; Susmita Dey Pinky; Orindom Shing Pulock (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Asia Pacific Studies 1
COVID-19 has exacerbated the existing crisis that the vulnerable refugee population faces. More than a million Rohingya refugees live in Bangladesh. COVID-19 has affected both males and females. It is critical to understand how this population group is coping during this trying period. They are constituted by 52% women and 55% adolescents. The socioeconomic and physiological repercussions of the pandemic on the Rohingya people are contextualised in this study. The socioeconomic and health impacts of COVID-19 on Rohingya women and adolescents in Bangladesh are investigated. Because of the restrictions imposed, over 63% of Rohingya adolescent females suffered from food scarcity. The vast majority of respondents (87%) stated that they had reduced their meal frequency, resulting in a protein deficiency. Since their arrival in Bangladesh, they have had limited access to medical and educational facilities. The pandemic has further exacerbated the situation. Girls are more vulnerable to sexual and gender-based abuse, early marriage, school dropout, and pregnancy. This research aims to add to existing knowledge on refugees, Rohingya, women, and adolescents
Impact of school closure due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on body mass index in Japanese children: Retrospective longitudinal study

AUTHOR(S)
Yuka Nagashima; Mikako Inokuchi; Yosuke Yasui (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Chils Health

During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the governments of many countries responded to high levels of infection with lockdowns. As a result, some children were reported to experience weight gain. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of school closures on body mass index (BMI) in Japanese children. This was a retrospective study of students enrolled in the participating schools (6- to 11-year-old elementary school students and 12- to 14-year-old junior high school students) between 2015 and 2020. Using school health check-up data, annual changes in the BMI standard deviation score (ΔBMI-SDS) were calculated. We compared ΔBMI-SDS in 2019–2020 with the corresponding control years.

Children's lives in an era of school closures: exploring the implications of COVID-19 for child labour in Ghana

AUTHOR(S)
Abdul-Rahim Mohammed

Published: July 2022   Journal: Children & Society
On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. Subsequently, governments worldwide implemented strict regimes of lockdowns and school closures to contain the transmission of the virus. Ghana's government on 15 March 2020 also announced a lockdown and closure of schools, lasting up till January 2021. Against this backdrop, the paper examined the implications of school closures on child labour in Ghana. Qualitative data for the study were collected between October 2020 to February 2021 in a small rural community in northern Ghana.
Working and caring for a disabled adopted child during a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Claudia Sellmaier; JaeRan Kim

Published: July 2022   Journal: Child & Family Social Work
Integrating work and family demands can be challenging for families caring for a child with one or more disabilities. The pandemic and its changes to work, schooling and service delivery potentially added to these challenges. This exploratory mixed methods study sought to understand how the pandemic affected adoptive parents' work–life fit and service use. A total of 200 participants responded to survey questions about parenting an adopted child with a disability prior to, and after, the onset of Covid-19. More than half of the parents (59.2%) reported that it was somewhat to very difficult to integrate both work and family demands. Parents with greater access to workplace flexibility and supportive supervisors had significantly less difficulties combining work and family. Families who reported more problems with accessing mental health services, special education and respite care reported significantly more challenges with work–family fit. Parents reported increased stress due to the pandemic changes, but many also shared positive changes such as more time for family. Online services were experienced as effective for some children and reduced time spent driving to appointments. Recommendations for workplace and social service practice and policy supporting adoptive parents of children with disabilities are discussed.
"Wearing a mask won't protect us from our history": the impact of COVID‐19 on black children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Erin Bogan; Valerie N. Adams-Bass; Lori A. Francis (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Social Policy Report
The data on COVID-19 show an irrefutable and disturbing pattern: Black Americans are contracting and dying from COVID-19 at rates that far exceed other racial and ethnic groups. Due to historical and current iterations of racism, Black Americans have been forced into conditions that elevate their risk for COVID-19 and consequently place Black children at the epicenter of loss across multiple domains of life. The current paper highlights the impact of the pandemic on Black children at the individual, family, and school levels. Based on an understanding of the influence of structural racism on COVID-19 disparities, policy recommendations are provided that focus on equitable access to quality education, home ownership, and employment to fully address the needs of Black children and families during and after the pandemic. Research, practice, and policy recommendations are made to journal editors, funding agencies, grant review panels, and researchers regarding how research on COVID-19 should be framed to inform intervention efforts aimed at improving the situation of Black children and families.
Ensuring emotional and psychological wellbeing in children through bibliotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sophia Adeyeye; Opeyemi Oboh

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Librarianship
Sudden lifestyle changes and disruption necessitated by the COVID-19 precautionary measures resulted in children becoming frightened, bored, isolated and anxious which automatically posed a threat to their emotional and psychological wellbeing. These set of children could be helped through therapeutic reading of books. Reading stories provides children with opportunities to gain insight and learn healthier ways to face the uncertainty caused by their inability to do things that they normally do like going to school, visit friends, go to parties, visit parks, visit the library and so on. The study used a prestest - posttest quasi- experimental methodology which lasted for a duration of 10 weeks, the study population were twenty-five (25) within the age bracket of 7-16 years old.
Knowledge and risk assessment of depression among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Marianna Charzyńska-Gula; Aneta Sabat; Barbara Ślusarska (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Education, Health and Sport

Depression, perceived in terms of a health problem, is a disorder that spreads dynamically in the youth population. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the problem. The aim of the study was to assess the level of knowledge and the risk of depression in the environment of a selected group of young people in the initial period of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study group consisted of 100 people - school students aged 15-20 years. An original questionnaire and the Kutcher Depression Scale for Youth were used. Results: The level of knowledge of adolescents about the risk factors for depression and symptoms that may indicate depression is average. Young people acquire knowledge from the Internet (41%) and TV programs (16%). Symptoms of depression were more frequent in: older participants of the study, those who assessed their financial situation as low, and students who had experience of depression in their family.

Children's experience of distance learning – the everyday life of first graders

AUTHOR(S)
Jolanta Bonar; Zuzanna Zbróg

Published: July 2022   Journal: Studies on the Theory of Education
The purpose of this paper is to present the everyday school life of younger pupils in pandemic times. The rationale behind the study (conducted from the child’s perspective) lies in the conviction that minors are active actors who understand and interpret the social reality around them and, therefore, are the most reliable source of information (for adults) on the meaning of everyday situations for them (Corsaro, 2005). The research material was collected through a focus group interview with first grade pupils from selected primary schools in Poland. This helped the authors understand children’s experience of distance learning. Analysis of the collected material reveals the many and diverse experiences children have regarding e-learning. The study makes it possible to identify the main categories impacting their daily school-related activities, the tangible environment that constitutes the physical space behind these activities, and the accompanying emotions.
Effectiveness of the PlayStrong Neuro-Filial Parenting Program: a program evaluation of an online pilot during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Georgie Wisen-Vincent; Rebecca Bokoch

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Play Therapy
This study piloted an online play-based parenting program informed by filial therapy, child–parent relationship therapy, and interpersonal neurobiology during COVID-19. The purpose of this program evaluation was to explore its potential effectiveness in improving child behaviors, mindful parenting, parent–child relationship quality, and protective factors. This study used a mixed method design to gather quantitative data from standardized measures and qualitative data from surveys. Parents of children 4–10 years old (N = 11) participated in 6 weekly 1.5-hr sessions which included teaching a new skill, asking questions, offering support, and sharing video or descriptions about using play-based parenting skills at home.
Essential work and emergency childcare: identifying gender differences in COVID-19 effects on labour demand and supply

AUTHOR(S)
Jordy Meekes; Wolter H. J. Hassink; Guyonne Kalb

Published: July 2022   Journal: Oxford Economic Papers,
This study examines whether the COVID-19 crisis affects women and men differently in terms of employment, working hours, and hourly wages, and whether the effects are demand or supply driven. COVID-19 impacts are studied using administrative data on all Dutch employees up to December 2020, focussing on the national lockdowns and emergency childcare for essential workers in the Netherlands. First, the impact of COVID-19 is much larger for non-essential workers than for essential workers. Although female non-essential workers are more affected than male non-essential workers, on average, women and men are equally affected, because more women than men are essential workers. Second, the impact for partnered essential workers with young children, both men and women, is not larger than for others. Third, single-parent essential workers respond with relatively large reductions in labour supply, suggesting emergency childcare was insufficient for them. Overall, labour demand effects appear larger than labour supply effects.
Effects of an online solution-focused psychoeducation programme on children's emotional resilience and problem-solving skills

AUTHOR(S)
Melih Burak Özdemir; Ayşe Bengisoy

Published: July 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
This study investigates the effects of a solution-oriented and approach-based psychoeducation programme, initiated in December 2019 and conducted online during the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, on children’s emotional resilience and problem-solving skills. In the world that was closed with the pandemic, children were kept away from the social support system of teachers and friends. Pandemic isolated the children. The negative experiences associated with COVID-19 have placed both traditional approaches and important online learning and support applications on the agenda, since both can help to solve the problems we face. Educators and experts have provided psychological support services, questioning the methods used to reach people during the pandemic and rediscovering alternative ways of connecting with individuals through online media. The online framework of this study emerged in response to the needs caused by the pandemic. The study is designed using a real experimental pattern and is based on a pretest-posttest, experimental/control-group model.
16 - 30 of 3365

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Check our quarterly thematic digests on children and COVID-19

Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.