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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Rapid assessment on the utilization of maternal and child health services during COVID-19 in Rwanda

AUTHOR(S)
D. Wanyana; R. Wong; D. Hakizimana

Published: March 2021   Journal: Public Health Action
 This study aimed to assess the change in the utilization of maternal and child health (MCH) services during the COVID-19 outbreak. This was a cross-sectional quantitative study. During the COVID-19 outbreak in Rwanda, the utilization of 15 MCH services in all four categories—antenatal care (ANC), deliveries, postnatal care (PNC) and vaccinations—significantly declined.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 11 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 12-21 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: health care facilities, maternal and child health services, public health, COVID-19 | Countries: Rwanda
Midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Zoe Bradfield; Yvonne Hauck; Caroline S. E. Homer (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Women and Birth
The COVID-19 pandemic has required rapid and radical changes to the way maternity care is provided in many nations across the world. Midwives provide care to childbearing women across the continuum and are key members of the maternity workforce in Australia. This paper aims to explore and describe midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.
Promoting and protecting human milk and breastfeeding in a COVID-19 world

AUTHOR(S)
Diane L. Spatz; Riccardo Davanzo; Janis A. Müller (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
The global COVID-19 pandemic has put enormous stress on healthcare systems and hospital staffing. However, through all this, families will continue to become pregnant, give birth, and breastfeed. Unfortunately, care of the childbearing family has been de-prioritized during the pandemic. Additionally, many healthcare practices during the pandemic have not been positive for the childbearing family or breastfeeding. Despite recommendations from the World Health Organization to promote early, direct breastfeeding and skin to skin contact, these and other recommendations are not being followed in the clinical setting. For example, some mothers have been forced to go through labor and birth alone in some institutions whilst some hospitals have limited or no parental visitation to infants in the NICU. Furthermore, hospitals are discharging mothers and their newborns early, limiting the amount of time that families receive expert lactation care, education, and technical assistance. In addition, some hospitals have furloughed staff or transferred them to COVID-19 wards, further negatively impacting direct care for families and their newborns.
Impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy outcomes: a population-based study

AUTHOR(S)
Francesca Crovetto; Fàtima Crispi; Elisa Llurba (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Clinical Infectious Diseases
This population-based study aims to describe the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnancy outcomes. Prospective, population-based study including pregnant women consecutively attended at first/second trimester or at delivery at three hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (IgG and IgM/IgA) were measured in all participants and nasopharyngeal RT-PCR was performed at delivery.
Exploring health-seeking behavior among adolescent mothers during the Ebola epidemic in Western rural district of Freetown, Sierra Leone

AUTHOR(S)
Hamida Massaquoi; Catherine Atuhaire; Gorgeous Sarah Chinkonono

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
From 2014 to 2016, the largest Ebola outbreak in history threatened Sierra Leone and its neighbouring countries, Guinea and Liberia. The Ebola outbreak impacted pregnant adolescent girl’s access to prenatal care during the pandemic. The aim of this study is to understand health-seeking behaviour among adolescent mothers who were pregnant during the Ebola epidemic in Waterloo, Sierra Leone
Newborn bloodspot screening in the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ronda F. Greaves; James Pitt; Candice McGregor

Published: January 2021   Journal: Genetics in Medicine

A COVID-19 pandemic business continuity plan (BCP) was rapidly developed to protect the Victorian newborn screening (NBS) program. Here, we present the outcomes of our COVID-19 BCP and its impact on the Victorian NBS laboratory service. Change management principles were used to develop a BCP that included mapping of NBS processes against staff resources, triaging priorities, technology solutions, supply chain continuity, gap analysis, and supporting maternity service providers. The effect was assessed quantitatively by review of key performance indicator data and qualitatively from staff feedback.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternal and perinatal health: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Bethany Kotlar; Emily Gerson; Sophia Petrillo (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Reproductive Health
The Covid-19 pandemic affects maternal health both directly and indirectly, and direct and indirect effects are intertwined. To provide a comprehensive overview on this broad topic in a rapid format behooving an emergent pandemic we conducted a scoping review. A scoping review was conducted to compile evidence on direct and indirect impacts of the pandemic on maternal health and provide an overview of the most significant outcomes thus far. Working papers and news articles were considered appropriate evidence along with peer-reviewed publications in order to capture rapidly evolving updates. Literature in English published from January 1st to September 11 2020 was included if it pertained to the direct or indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the physical, mental, economic, or social health and well-being of pregnant people. Narrative descriptions were written about subject areas for which the authors found the most evidence. Results: Th
Common mental disorders in mothers of children attending out-patient malnutrition clinics in rural North-western Nigeria: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Aminu T. Abdullahi; Zubaida L. Farouk; Abdulazeez Imam

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
Children with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition are managed routinely within out-patient malnutrition treatment programs. These programs do not offer maternal mental health support services, despite maternal mental health playing a significant role in the nutritional status of children. Additionally, the burden of maternal Common Mental Disorders (CMDs) is poorly described among mothers of children attending these programs. This study thus determined the burden and risk factors for maternal CMDs among children attending out-patient malnutrition clinics in rural North-western Nigeria
A preparedness model for mother–baby linked longitudinal surveillance for emerging threats
Published: January 2021   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal

Public health responses often lack the infrastructure to capture the impact of public health emergencies on pregnant women and infants, with limited mechanisms for linking pregnant women with their infants nationally to monitor long-term effects. In 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in close collaboration with state, local, and territorial health departments, began a 5-year initiative to establish population-based mother–baby linked longitudinal surveillance, the Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies Network (SET-NET). The objective of this report is to describe an expanded surveillance approach that leverages and modernizes existing surveillance systems to address the impact of emerging health threats during pregnancy on pregnant women and their infants.

“We have a lot of home deliveries”: a qualitative study on the impact of COVID-19 on access to and utilization of reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health care among refugee women in urban Eastleigh, Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Adelaide M. Lusambili; Michela Martini; Faiza Abdirahman (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Migration and Health
This study aimed to improve understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on women refugees’ access to and utilisation of antenatal care, delivery and postnatal care in Eastleigh, Kenya.
The changing aspects of motherhood in face of the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Prince Kingsley; Paul Kingsley Vijay; Jacob Kumaresan (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal
The aim of this article is to advocate perspectives to strengthen existing healthcare systems to prioritize maternal health services amidst and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and middle income countries. COVID-19 directly affects pregnant women causing more severe disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The indirect effects due to the monumental COVID-19 response are much worse, increasing maternal and neonatal mortality.
Covid-19 pandemic impact on maternal and child health services access in Nampula, Mozambique: a mixed methods research

AUTHOR(S)
Paulo das Neves Pires; Cynthia Macaringue; Ahmed Abdirazak (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMC Health Services Research
The Covid-19 pandemic limited access to health services in most countries, impacting negatively global health. Last March 2020 in Mozambique, a public state of emergency restrained people’s movements, reduced public services, and launched a national information campaign. The Alert Community for a Prepared Hospital implementation research, has been promoting access to maternal and child health care, at Marrere General Hospital and Marrere Health Centre, in Natikiri, Nampula, the city with the third highest incidence of Covid-19 in Mozambique. This research aimed to assess the impact of Covid-19 on access to maternal and children health services in Nampula and estimate Alert Community for a Prepared Hospital project sustainability.
Maternal and newborn care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya: re-contextualizing the community midwifery model

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Wangari Kimani; Rose Maina; Constance Shumba (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Human Resources for Health
Peripartum deaths remain significantly high in low- and middle-income countries, including Kenya. The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted essential services, which could lead to an increase in maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, the lockdowns, curfews, and increased risk for contracting COVID-19 may affect how women access health facilities. SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus that requires a community-centred response, not just hospital-based interventions. In this prolonged health crisis, pregnant women deserve a safe and humanised birth that prioritises the physical and emotional safety of the mother and the baby. There is an urgent need for innovative strategies to prevent the deterioration of maternal and child outcomes in an already strained health system. 
COVID-19’s impact on HIV vertical transmission services reversed
Institution: UNAIDS - The Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS
Published: October 2020
Recent data collection has shown that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on HIV testing services but the impact on HIV treatment has been less than originally feared. The impact on services for the prevention of vertical transmission of HIV (from mother to child) is mixed—by April, countries generally saw a decline in the number of women tested for HIV at their first antenatal clinic visit, but by June that decline had been reversed.
The promotion of positive mental health for new mothers during Covid-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Barlow

Published: October 2020
The Covid-19 pandemic has caused increased hardship for new mothers and their young children. Increased isolation, lack of in-person doctor visits and decreased interaction within the community, has pregnant and postpartum women in need of additional support. Occupational therapists often work with infants and their mothers due to feeding concerns. Difficulty with early feeding adds additional stress on the mother–infant dyad relationship. This case study describes a mother’s traumatic experience giving birth during Covid-19 and the occupational therapy intervention provided to the mother–infant dyad. In order to improve outcomes for the mother and child with feeding concerns, this case study is a call to action for paediatric occupational therapy practitioners to include the promotion of positive mental health of mothers in their practice, particularly during the pandemic.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.