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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 51
The perception of Italian pregnant women and new mothers about their psychological wellbeing, lifestyle, delivery, and neonatal management experience during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown: a web-based survey

AUTHOR(S)
Viviana Stampini; Alice Monzani; Silvia Caristia (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, drastic measures for social distancing have been introduced also in Italy, likely with a substantial impact in delicate conditions like pregnancy and puerperium. The study aimed to investigate the changes in lifestyle, access to health services, and mental wellbeing during the first Italian lockdown in a sample of Italian pregnant women and new mothers.
Maternal thoughts of self-harm and their association with future offspring mental health problems

AUTHOR(S)
Elise Paul; Alex Kwong; Paul Moran (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

Depression and self-harm are leading causes of disability in young people, but prospective data on how maternal depression and self-harm thoughts contribute to these outcomes, and how they may interact is lacking. The study sample consisted of 8,425 mothers and offspring from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, an ongoing birth cohort study. Exposures were maternal self-harm ideation and depression measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, collected at eleven time points over the period 18 weeks’ gestation to 18 years post-partum. Outcomes were offspring past-year major depressive disorder and lifetime self-harm assessed at age 24.

Widespread implementation of a low-cost telehealth service in the delivery of antenatal care during the COVID-19 pandemic: an interrupted time-series analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Kirsten R. Palmer; Michael Tanner; Miranda Davies-Tuck (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: The Lancet Journal
Little evidence is available on the use of telehealth for antenatal care. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this study developed and implemented a new antenatal care schedule integrating telehealth across all models of pregnancy care. To inform this clinical initiative, it aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of telehealth in antenatal care.
Estimating global and regional disruptions to routine childhood vaccine coverage during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020: a modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Causey; Nancy Fullman; Reed J. D. Sorensen (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: The Lancet1
The COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission substantially affected health services worldwide. To better understand the impact of the pandemic on childhood routine immunisation, this study estimated disruptions in vaccine coverage associated with the pandemic in 2020, globally and by Global Burden of Disease (GBD) super-region. For this analysis it used a two-step hierarchical random spline modelling approach to estimate global and regional disruptions to routine immunisation using administrative data and reports from electronic immunisation systems, with mobility data as a model input. Paired with estimates of vaccine coverage expected in the absence of COVID-19, which were derived from vaccine coverage models from GBD 2020, Release 1 (GBD 2020 R1), it estimated the number of children who missed routinely delivered doses of the third-dose diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine and first-dose measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) in 2020.
Anxious and traumatised: users’ experiences of maternity care in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Julia Sanders; Rebecca Blaylock

Published: July 2021   Journal: Midwifery
The COVID-19 pandemic saw universal, radical, and ultra-rapid changes to UK National Health Services (NHS) maternity care. At the onset of the pandemic, NHS maternity services were stripped of many of the features which support woman and family centred care. In anticipation of unknown numbers of pregnant women and maternity staff potentially sick with COVID-19, services were pared back to the minimum level considered to be required to keep women and their babies safe. The aim of this survey was to understand the impact of COVID-19 public health messaging and pandemic-related service changes on users of maternity care in the UK during the pandemic.
Challenges in maternal and child health services delivery and access during pandemics or public health disasters in low-and middle-income countries: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Krushna Chandra Sahoo; Sapna Negi; Kripalini Patel (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Healthcare
Maternal and child health (MCH) has been a global priority for many decades and is an essential public health service. Ensuring seamless delivery is vital for desirable MCH outcomes. This systematic review outlined the challenges in accessing and continuing MCH services during public health emergencies—pandemics and disasters. A comprehensive search approach was built based on keywords and MeSH terms relevant to ‘MCH services’ and ‘pandemics/disasters’. The online repositories Medline, CINAHL, Psyc INFO, and Epistemonikos were searched for studies. We included twenty studies—seven were on the Ebola outbreak, two on the Zika virus, five related to COVID-19, five on disasters, and one related to conflict situations. The findings indicate the potential impact of emergencies on MCH services. Low utilization and access to services have been described as common challenges. The unavailability of personal safety equipment and fear of infection were primary factors that affected service delivery. The available evidence, though limited, indicates the significant effect of disasters and pandemics on MCH. However, more primary in-depth studies are needed to understand better the overall impact of emergencies, especially the COVID-19 pandemic, on MCH.
Stress levels among an international sample of pregnant and postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Diego F. Wyszynski; Sonia Hernandez-Diaz; Vanessa Gordon-Dseagu (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Stress is a complex condition that can have a profound effect on an individual’s sense of wellbeing and their ability to live a happy and healthy life. COVID-19 and its associated stressors have the potential to disrupt numerous facets of our everyday lives. Pregnant and postpartum women are especially vulnerable to changes in the availability of routine health and social care services and of their support networks. The current study sought to explore stress levels and their influencers among an international cohort of pregnant and postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Psychosocial outcomes of COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers in maternity services

AUTHOR(S)
Recep Erin; Yeşim Bayoğlu Tekin

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology

This study investigated the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on social support and anxiety levels in healthcare professionals working in maternity services situated in Trabzon, Turkey. It was designed retrospectively and observationally. Social support to the participants was measured using a scale called the multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). State anxiety scale (STAI TX-1) and trait anxiety scale (STAI TX-2) were used to determine the level of anxiety. All scales were measured before and during the pandemic. Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data where p < 0.05 was considered significant.

Factors associated with dietary diversity and physical activity of pregnant women in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study at an antenatal care setting

AUTHOR(S)
Satyajit Kundu; Dilruba Easmin Jharna; Md. Hasan Al Banna (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Lifestyle Medicine
Both dietary diversity and physical activity during pregnancy are very important since they are known to affect pregnancy and birth outcomes. However, little is documented on dietary diversity and physical activity among pregnant women in Bangladesh. Accordingly, this study was designed to assess the dietary diversity and physical activity level, as well as their associated factors, among pregnant women at an antenatal care setting in Bangladesh.
Australian women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Alyce N. Wilson; Linda Sweet; Vidanka Vasilevski (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Birth

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to multiple changes in maternity services worldwide. Systems rapidly adapted to meet public health requirements aimed at preventing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, including quarantine procedures, travel restrictions, border closures, physical distancing and “stay-at-home” orders. Although these changes have impacted all stakeholders in maternity services, arguably the women at the center of this care have been most affected. This study aimed to explore women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. A national cross-sectional online survey, including fixed choice and open-ended questions, was conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia; pregnant and postnatal women were recruited through social media networks.

Disruptions in maternal and child health service utilization during COVID-19: analysis from eight sub-Saharan African countries

AUTHOR(S)
Gil Shapira; Tashrik Ahmed; Salomé Henriette Paulette Drouard (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Health Policy and Planning
The coronavirus-19 pandemic and its secondary effects threaten the continuity of essential health services delivery, which may lead to worsened population health and a protracted public health crisis. We quantify such disruptions, focusing on maternal and child health, in eight sub-Saharan countries. Service volumes are extracted from administrative systems for 63 954 facilities in eight countries: Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Somalia. Using an interrupted time series design and an ordinary least squares regression model with facility-level fixed effects, we analyze data from January 2018 to February 2020 to predict what service utilization levels would have been in March–July 2020 in the absence of the pandemic, accounting for both secular trends and seasonality.
The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnant women

AUTHOR(S)
Ruxandra-Gabriela Cigăran; Radu Botezatu; Elma-Maria Mînecan (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Healthcare
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has meant significant precautions and changes in delivering healthcare services. The aim of the study was to explore the lifestyle changes of pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic in Romania, the changes in prenatal care and delivery during the pandemic and the psychological impact on women and to determine how healthcare providers can help them to overcome this period. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted anonymously and distributed among pregnancy-related groups from Romania, recruiting 559 study participants, between May and October 2020.
Knowledge and preventive practices towards COVID-19 among pregnant women seeking antenatal services in Northern Ghana

AUTHOR(S)
Maxwell Tii Kumbeni; Paschal Awingura Apanga; Eugene Osei Yeboah (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Plos One
COVID-19 is a novel respiratory disease associated with severe morbidity and high mortality in the elderly population and people with comorbidities. Studies have suggested that pregnant women are more susceptible to COVID-19 compared to non-pregnant women. However, it’s unclear whether pregnant women in Ghana are knowledgeable about COVID-19 and practice preventive measures against it. This study sought to assess the knowledge and preventive practices towards COVID-19 among pregnant women seeking antenatal services in Northern Ghana
A co-design of clinical virtual care pathways to engage and support families requiring neonatal intensive care in response to the COVID-19 pandemic (COVES study)

AUTHOR(S)
Marsha Campbell-Yeo; Justine Dol; Brianna Richardson (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Neonatal Nursing

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, family presence restrictions in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) were enacted to limit disease transmission. This has resulted in communication challenges, negatively impacting family integrated care. To develop clinical care pathways to ensure optimal neonatal care to support families in response to parental presence restrictions imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Delivery management of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 positive mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Chih Lin; Shih-Ming Chu; Jen-Fu Hsu (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Pediatrics & Neonatology

The Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought catastrophic impact on the world since the beginning of December 2019. Extra precautionary measures against COVID-19 during and after delivery are pivotal to ensure the safety of the baby and health care workers. Based on current literature, it is recommended that delivery decisions be discussed between obstetricians and neonatologists prior to delivery, and designated negative pressure delivery rooms should be arranged for COVID person under investigation (PUI). During delivery, a minimal number of experienced staff attending delivery should don personal protective equipment (PPE) and follow the neonatal resuscitation program (NRP). Positive pressure ventilation is best used in a negative pressure room if available. At-risk babies should be transported in an isolette, and tested for COVID-19 in a negative pressure room soon after bathing. Skin-to-skin contact and breast milk feed should continue under certain circumstances. Although newborns with COVID-19 infections often present with symptoms that mimic sepsis and one third of affected patients may demand some form of respiratory support, short-term prognoses are favorable and most recover within two weeks of symptoms onset.


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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.