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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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946 - 960 of 1045
Depression, anxiety, resilience, and coping: the experience of pregnant and new mothers during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Patricia A. Kinser; Nancy Jallo; Ananda B. Amstadter (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Women's Health
It is well-documented that the mental health of pregnant and postpartum women is essential for maternal, child, and family well-being. Of major public health concern is the perinatal mental health impacts that may occur during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It is essential to explore the symptom experience and predictors of mental health status, including the relationship between media use and mental health. Materials and Methods: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the experiences of pregnant and postpartum women (n = 524) in the United States in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Quality of life changes during the COVID-19 pandemic for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD

AUTHOR(S)
Keith W. Pecor; Georgia Barbyannis; Max Yang (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to caregivers of children. Families with children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are an understudied but potentially vulnerable population to changes during the outbreak. As such, the aim of this study was to contrast quality of life for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD, before and during the pandemic, compared to caregivers of neurotypical (NT) children.
Next generation Europe: a recovery plan for children, adolescents and their families

AUTHOR(S)
Jörg M. Fegert; Laura A. Kehoe; Fusun Çuhadaroglu Çetin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The youth of today—our most precious resource—are finally getting the attention they deserve. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the toll exerted on their mental health had been overlooked during the early months of the pandemic. In the first lockdown, the needs of children and adolescents and their families were largely ignored apart from the child and adolescent psychiatrists all over Europe who worked tirelessly on their behalf. The lives of our young people were severely restricted and for many, this complex situation was incomprehensible. The protection of these children’s rights and their welfare have finally come sharply into focus.
Evaluation of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on children with cerebral palsy, caregivers' quality of life, and caregivers' fear of COVID-19 with telemedicine

AUTHOR(S)
Damla Cankurtaran; Nihal Tezel; Sadik Yigit Yildiz (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Irish Journal of Medical Science
The sudden and unexpected pandemic changed the daily routine of the children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their caregivers. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the utilization of health and rehabilitation services and the general health and physical status of children with CP. In addition, the second aim of the study was to examine the efects of the COVID-19 pandemic on caregivers’ quality of life (QOL) and their fear of COVID-19.
Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the sexual and mental health of adolescent and adult men who have sex with men and transgender women participating in two PrEP cohort studies in Brazil: COBra study protocol

AUTHOR(S)
Dulce Ferraz; Inês Dourado; Eliana Miura Zucchi (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
The COVID-19 pandemic and its control measures have impacted health and healthcare provision in various levels. Physical distancing measures, for instance, may affect sexual health, impacting access to HIV prevention supplies and changing sexual behaviour, as well as mental health, increasing feelings of unsafety and weakening community support ties. These effects can be worsened among socially marginalised groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). Brazil is among the countries most affected by COVID-19 in the world, where control measures have been inconsistently implemented. This study aims to investigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the sexual and mental health of adolescent and adult MSM and TGW in Brazil.
Alleviating psychological distress and promoting mental wellbeing among adolescents living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, during and after COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Moses Okumua; Thabani Nyoni; William Byansi

Published: April 2021   Journal: Global Public Health
COVID-19 social control measures (e.g. physical distancing and lockdowns) can have both immediate (social isolation, loneliness, anxiety, stress) and long-term effects (depression, post-traumatic stress disorder) on individuals’ mental health. This may be particularly true of adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) and their caregivers – populations already overburdened by intersecting stressors (e.g. psychosocial, biomedical, familial, economic, social, or environmental). Addressing the adverse mental health sequelae of COVID-19 among ALHIV requires a multi-dimensional approach that at once (a) economically empowers ALHIV and their households and (b) trains, mentors, and supervises community members as lay mental health services providers. Mental health literacy programming can also be implemented to increase mental health knowledge, reduce stigma, and improve service use among ALHIV. Schools and HIV care clinics offer ideal environments for increasing mental health literacy and improving access to mental health services.
Stress and coping among pregnant black women during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jenna M. Wheeler; Dawn P. Misra; Carmen Giurgescu

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health Nursing

This study explored stress and coping among pregnant Black women prior to and during the COVID‐19 pandemic. It is a prospective, longitudinal, cohort study.

Impact of the coronavirus lockdown on older adolescents engaged in a school-based stress management program: changes in mental health, sleep, social support, and routines

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Schjølberg Marques; Ruth Braidwood

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children & Schools
The mental health effects of the coronavirus pandemic are likely to be significant and sustained, especially for those who experience adversity or preexisting mental health difficulties. This article examines the experiences of older adolescents during the United Kingdom government’s “lockdown” period (April 2020 to June 2020) on mental health, social support, sleep, and routines using both quantitative and qualitative methods.
Depression and anxiety in pregnancy during COVID-19: a rapid review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Lianne M. Tomfohr-Madsen; Nicole Racine; Gerald F. Giesbrecht (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Psychiatry Research
The study rapidly reviewed and meta-analyzed the worldwide prevalence of depression and anxiety among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. A systematic search of the literature and meta-analyses were conducted from December 2019 – February 2021 with a total of 46 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Depression was assessed in 37 studies (N = 47,677), with a pooled prevalence of 25.6%. Anxiety was assessed in 34 studies (N = 42,773), with a pooled prevalence of 30.5%; moderation by time showed that prevalence of anxiety was higher in studies conducted later in the pandemic.
The mediating role of daytime sleepiness between problematic smartphone use and post-traumatic symptoms in COVID-19 home-refined adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Tao Hu; Ying Wang; Ling Lin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review

COVID-19 was first recognized in late 2019 in China, at which time school closures forced most students to isolate at home or maintain social distance, both of which increased smartphone use, daytime sleepiness and post traumatic disorder (PTSD) risks. However, to date, no research has fully explored these behavioral risks or the consequences. Two thousand and ninety home-confined students from two Chinese high schools participated in an online-based questionnaire battery that assessed their sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 related exposures, daytime sleepiness, problematic smartphone use, and PTSD. The subsequent data were subjected to mediation analysis, and structural equation models (SEM) were employed to explore the variable relationships.

Development of a brief group CBT intervention to reduce COVID-19-related distress among school-age youth

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Rodriguez-Quintana; Allison E. Meyer; Emily Bilek (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
School-aged youth have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of the pandemic will likely have long-standing effects on the well-being of youth, and access to mental health care is even more critical during this time. For the past 5 years, TRAILS (Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students) has been working throughout the state to increase utilization of evidence-based mental health practices among K-12 school mental health professionals (SMHPs). By leveraging SMHPs who are widely accessible to students, TRAILS seeks to improve youth access to effective mental health care and reduce current mental health inequities. In March 2020, TRAILS responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by developing a group manual designed to be delivered virtually by SMHPs to help students develop effective coping skills to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.
Cognitive reappraisal and self-compassion as emotion regulation strategies for parents during COVID-19: An online randomized controlled trial

AUTHOR(S)
Hanna Preuss; Klara Capito; Rahel Lea van Eickels (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Internet Interventions
Parenting during pandemic restrictions places extreme demands on everyday family life, leading to increased stress levels for parents and distressed parent-child interactions. This RCT aimed to investigate whether cognitive reappraisal and self-compassion are helpful emotion regulation (ER) strategies to reduce individual and parental stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: An online intervention for parents was developed focusing on the application of ER strategies to pandemic requirements of families.
The rise of tele-mental health in perinatal settings

AUTHOR(S)
Pamela A. Geller; Navy Spiecker; Joanna C. M. Cole (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Seminars in Perinatology
This study discusses the use of tele-mental health in settings serving expectant parents in fetal care centers and parents with children receiving treatment in neonatal intensive care units within a pediatric institution. Its emphasis is on the dramatic rise of tele-mental health service delivery for this population in the wake of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., including relevant practice regulations, challenges and advantages associated with the transition to tele-mental health in these perinatal settings.
Use of kids helpline by children and young people in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha Batchelor; Stoyan Stoyanov; Jane Pirkis (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health

The benefits of helplines are particularly valuable during a pandemic when face-to-face services and natural supports are difficult to access. Kids Helpline, Australia's national youth helpline, provides children and young people with free 24/7 information and counseling through telephone, WebChat, and e-mail. This study aimed to examine the use of Kids Helpline during the COVID-19 pandemic. It analyzed monthly and weekly time trends of demand for and response by the Kids Helpline. The frequency of counseling contacts by common concern types, age, and gender were also examined.

Addressing the clinical impact of COVID-19 on pediatric mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Bartek; Jessica L. Peck; Dawn Garzon (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Health Care
The novel coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic impacts the daily lives of families around the world. Sequelae are not limited to physical consequences of medical complications, but extend into social, emotional, spiritual, and psychological health. Interventions including mask wearing and physical distancing are intended to prevent viral spread but have an unintended negative effect on mental health and child development because of social isolation. Though it is too early to know the full impact of the pandemic on this generation of children, practicing pediatric clinicians are well positioned to help young people recover and thrive despite the challenges presented by the pandemic. The purpose of this article is to review emerging evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in children, and to discuss practical steps and interventions that can be used in primary care to foster resilience in youth and their families.
946 - 960 of 1045

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

The second digest discussed children and violence during the pandemic.

The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.