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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Parents’ distress and poor parenting during COVID-19: the buffering effects of partner support and cooperative coparenting

AUTHOR(S)
Caitlin S. McRae McRae; Annette M. E. Henderson; Rachel S. T. Low (et al.)

Published: September 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic is placing considerable demands on parents that amplify the risk of poor parenting. Leveraging an ongoing longitudinal study, the current study tests whether parents’ distress during a mandated lockdown predicts residual changes in poorer parenting and identifies within-family support processes that buffer these harmful effects.
A mixed-method study of individual, couple, and parental functioning during the state-regulated COVID-19 lockdown in Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Günther-Bel; Anna Vilaregut; Eduard Carratala (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Family Process
This study explored the individual and relational well-being of people confined together with their partners and/or children during the first 3 weeks of state-regulated lockdown during the recent COVID-19 outbreak in Spain.  Although correlates of psychological distress (e.g., unemployment, perceived economic risk) were relatively stable across subgroups, predictors of relationship functioning varied substantially with household/parental status (e.g., telecommuting and employment facilitated conjugal functioning only for couples with children).
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 59 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 1060-1079 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: mental health services, parent-child relationship, psychological distress, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: Spain
Child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: consequences of parental job loss on psychological and physical abuse towards children

AUTHOR(S)
Monica Lawson; Megan H. Piel; Michaela Simon

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The current study investigated factors associated with child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, including parental job loss, and whether cognitive reframing moderated associations between job loss and child maltreatment.
How personality relates to distress in parents during the Covid-19 lockdown: the mediating role of child's emotional and behavioral difficulties and the moderating effect of living with other people

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Mazza; Eleonora Ricci; Daniela Marchetti (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Since the initiation of the COVID-19 lockdown, Italian parents have been forced to manage their children at home. The present study aimed at investigating the psychological distress of parents during the lockdown, identifying contributing factors.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 17 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: mental stress, parent-child relationship, psychological distress, lockdown | Countries: Italy
Women's and men's work, housework and childcare, before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Del Boca; Noemi Oggero; Paola Profeta (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
Using new survey data collected in April 2020 from a representative sample of Italian women, we analyse the effects of working arrangements due to COVID-19 on housework, childcare and home schooling among couples where both partners work. Our results show that most of the additional housework and childcare associated to COVID-19 falls on women while childcare activities are more equally shared within the couple than housework activities.
School lessons from the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Taylor

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This article draws on recent literature spawned by the Covid-19 outbreak, together with related research studies and a survey of 16 South African families undertaken in April 2020 at the start of the national lockdown. A qualitative case study method was adopted and telephonic interviews conducted with the main caregiver and up to two children in each family in order to understand how learning at home might be promoted.
Contextualizing parental/familial influence on physical activity in adolescents before and during COVID-19 pandemic: a prospective analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Gilic; Ljerka Ostojic; Marin Corluka (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Children
Parental and familial factors influence numerous aspects of adolescents’ lives, including their physical activity level (PAL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in PAL which occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to evaluate influence of sociodemographic and parental/familial factors on PAL levels before and during pandemic in adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 24 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Bosnia And Herzegovina
COVID-19: urgency for distancing from domestic violence

AUTHOR(S)
Deniz Ertan; Wissam El-Hage; Sarah Thierrée

Published: September 2020   Journal: European Journal of Psychotraumatology
Although COVID-19 is a major worldwide health threat, there is another global public health emergency that is becoming a growing challenge. Domestic violence is a public health and human rights issue that primarily affects women and children worldwide. Several countries have reported a significant increase in domestic violence cases since the COVID-19-induced lockdowns and physical distancing measures were implemented. The COVID-19 health crisis is exacerbating another pre-existing public health problem by increasing the severity and frequency of domestic violence, thus demonstrating the need to adopt significant and long-term measures.
Child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: consequences of parental job loss on psychological and physical abuse towards children

AUTHOR(S)
Monica Lawson; Megan H. Piel; Michaela Simon

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The current study investigated factors associated with child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, including parental job loss, and whether cognitive reframing moderated associations between job loss and child maltreatment.
Supporting families to protect child health: parenting quality and household needs during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Leslie E. Roos; Emily Cameron; Jennifer Lisa Penner Protudjer (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Supportive parenting is critical for promoting healthy child development in the face of stressors, such as those occurring during COVID-19. Here, we address a knowledge gap regarding specific household risk factors associated with parenting quality during the pandemic and incorporate first-person accounts of family challenges and needs. Lower quality parenting during COVID-19 is associated with multiple household and pandemic risk factors, with caregiver depression consistently linked to parentchild
relationship disruptions. Focused efforts are needed to address caregiver mental health to protect child health as part of the pandemic response.
Impact of social distancing on the mental health of parents and children in Qatar

AUTHOR(S)
Mohamed Abdelrahman; Duaa Al-Adwan; Youssef Hassan

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Vaccine
This study investigates the effects of COVID-19-related social distancing practices on parents and children’s mental health and explored the roles parental activities with children and coping strategies among families in Qatar. The path analysis shows that social distancing practices influence both parents’ and children’s mental health through parents’ activities with children and their coping strategies. Our findings reveal how living under stressful conditions such as COVID-19 could enhance the mental health of family members.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 33 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, mental health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Qatar
The urgency of mitigating the psychological impacts of COVID-19 lockdowns on parents of mentally disabled children

AUTHOR(S)
Annas Ghafoor; Khurram Altaf Hussain; Imaduddin Sawal

Published: August 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Raising a child with a mental disability puts a significant amount of social, financial, and psychological strain on the entire family. Parents are especially susceptible as they are the primary and only constant caregivers. The difficulty of the task demands that aspects of caretaking be delegated to external agencies to reach an optimal compensation between personal well-being of the parents and nurturement of the child. Amid the haste policies created for country-wide lockdowns, many governments have ignored this vulnerable subset of the popula-tion.
Psychological flexibility and inflexibility as sources of resiliency and risk during a pandemic: Modeling the cascade of COVID-19 stress on family systems with a contextual behavioral science lens

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer S. Daks; Jack Peltz; Ronald D. Rogge

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and the historic economic shutdown and stay at home efforts to slow its spread have radically impacted the lives of  families across the world, completely disrupting routines and challenging them to adjust to new health risks as well as to new work and family demands.
The current study applied a contextual behavioral science lens to the spillover hypothesis of Family Systems Theory to develop a multi-stage mechanistic model for how COVID-19 stress could impact family and child functioning and how parents’ psychological flexibility could shape those processes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 18 | No. of pages: 16-27 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: parent-child relationship, psychological distress, child well-being, lockdown | Countries: United States
Material hardship and parenting stress among grandparent kinship providers during the COVID-19 pandemic: The mediating role of grandparents' mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Yanfeng Xua; Qi Wu; Sue E. Levkoff

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
 This study examined the relationship between material hardship and parenting stress among grandparent kinship providers, and assessed grandparents’ mental health as a potential mediator to this relationship during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.
On mothering and being mothered: A personal reflection on women's productivity during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Annette Clancy

Published: June 2020   Journal: Gender, Work & Organization
This is a personal reflection, as a female academic during Covid-19, on how women's academic productivity seems primarily to be discussed in relation to a different kind of productivity-motherhood. A recent procedure in a maternity hospital, evoked feelings and associations of mothering and being mothered, and how these associations hover over relationships regardless of whether wombs are productive or not. My hope in writing this piece, is that every woman's fear and anxiety may be productively contained (regardless of how she is seen from the outside or momentarily construed from within) during this time of extraordinary turmoil.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.