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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Young children's traumatic stress reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic: the long reach of mothers' adverse childhood experiences

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa J. Hagan; Danielle R. Roubinov; Alana Cordeiro (et al.)

Published: September 2022   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted parental and child mental health; however, it is critical to examine this impact in the context of parental histories of adversity. this study hypothesized that maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and pandemic-related negative life events would predict child traumatic stress symptoms (TSS) and tested potential mediating pathways through maternal pandemic-related TSS and/or poorer maternal sensitivity during the pandemic. Data were collected from a longitudinal sample of low-income, racially/ethnically diverse mothers and their children. Between May and November 2020, mothers (n = 111) of young children (M age = 7.42 years, SD = 0.45) completed questionnaires to assess their own and their child's pandemic-related TSS, exposure to pandemic-related negative events, and parent-child relationship quality. Maternal ACEs, maternal depression, parent-child relationship quality, and child internalizing symptoms had been assessed approximately 1–3 years prior.

The role of teachers and parents to improve children's motivational learning in pandemic situation

AUTHOR(S)
Sri Astuti; Diki Rukmana; Puri Pramudiani

Published: September 2022   Journal: International Journal of Evaluation and Research in Education
This study analyzed the teachers' and parents' synergy in motivating children to take online learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. The research instrument consisted of 13 survey questions distributed via Google Form and succeeded in capturing 139 samples of parents of preschool and elementary school students spread across 17 provinces in Indonesia. Factor analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM) were conducted to analyze the instrument's validity and test hypotheses. The factor analysis results showed that the 13 instruments used showed an excellent correlation to confirm each variable's structure. The SEM analysis results showed that in the online learning system applied to preschool and elementary school children, parents play a significant role in the children's motivation to take online learning at home. Parents were also a positive and significant mediator variable in the teacher's role in increasing children's learning motivation.
COVID-19 pandemic impact on family life and exacerbated emotional and behavioral health among preschool children: a longitudinal study

AUTHOR(S)
Xiuxiu Ding; Haixia Liu; Hao Wang (et al.)

Published: September 2022   Journal: International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology

This study aimed to examine associations of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on family life with emotional and behavioral health among preschool children. A longitudinal study including 1595 preschool children aged 3–6 years and their families was conducted in Anhui Province. The linear regression was applied to examine associations between the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on family life and emotional and behavioral health.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children with medical complexity

AUTHOR(S)
Catherine Diskin; Francine Buchanan; Eyal Cohen (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: BMC Pediatrics

Descriptions of the COVID-19 pandemic’s indirect consequences on children are emerging. This study aimed to describe the impacts of the pandemic on children with medical complexity (CMC) and their families. It is a one-time survey of Canadian paediatricians using the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program (CPSP) was conducted in Spring 2021.

Pedagogical conditions for correcting children's feeling of helplessness during global pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Galina Vlasova; Anatoly Turchin; Vladimir Karapetyan

Published: August 2022   Journal: Scientific News
The article presents the content, forms and methods of professional development of teachers, psychologists and parents in the field of mental health of preschool children. It has been proven that more factors influence on children’s upbringing and development than congenital one. The study of the main determining role in the mental development of the child is presented in the form of objects and sign system. Harmonious development of children largely depends on their psychic health, so the issue of psychic health formation is still relevant.
Psychosocial impact of lockdown on children due to COVID-19: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Mahdi Alnamnakani; Shuliweeh Alenezi; Hani Temsah (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health

Quarantine measures during the COVID-19 lockdown had a negative impact on children’s psychology and development. This study aimed to evaluate the psychological impact of quarantine on children due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia and to assess types of reported child maltreatment before and after the pandemic. A cross-sectional survey among parents was performed along with a retrospective data review for anonymized data from the National Family Safety Program, Saudi Arabia. 436 children participated in this survey during June-November 2020.

"Having a family is the new normal": parenting in neoliberal academia during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Thais França; Filipa Godinho; Beatriz Padilla (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Gender, Work & Organization
The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has made explicit the burden of care shouldered by academic mothers, in addition to juggling their scholarly commitments. Although discussions are abundant on the impact of caring responsibilities on the careers of women academics, neoliberal academia continues to minimize such struggles. Despite the disruptions to family routines caused by the health crisis, academic institutions have expected academic mothers and fathers to continue undertaking their professional responsibilities at the same level as before, disregarding their parenting demands. This paper contributes to the research on parenthood in academia by looking at how, throughout the pandemic, academic parents have negotiated the tensions between parenthood and academic demands, and by investigating the strategies they use to confront neoliberal culture of academic performativity, even amid the health crisis. The paper engages with the “space invaders” concept used by Puwar (2004) to analyze the “hypervisibility” of academic mothers' and fathers' “bodies out of place” during the pandemic, and to investigate their “renegade acts” against the uncaring attitudes of their institutions. Evidence is drawn from a qualitative study conducted during December 2020 and January 2021 among scholars affiliated to Portuguese academic institutions: 17 in-depth interviews conducted with women, and two mixed-gender focus groups.
Parents perceptions of online physical activity and leisure with early years children during Covid-19 and beyond

AUTHOR(S)
Georgia Allen; Philippa Velija

Published: August 2022   Journal: Leisure Studies
Prior to Covid-19, businesses offering enrichment activities for pre-school aged children were saturating the early years (0–5 years) market. However, the pandemic caused sudden changes to family routines with regular leisure activities cancelled. Using Lareau’s theory of concerted cultivation as a framework, this study explored how physical activity (PA) was managed by parents of pre-school children and how routines changed during the pandemic. A UK national online survey was completed by 925 parents. Sixteen tailored, follow-up semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents.
Understanding the role of psychosocial factors in Pakistani parents' hesitancy to vaccinate their kids: the mediating role of knowledge and mistrust of science about the COVID-19 vaccine

AUTHOR(S)
Riffat Shahani; Jianxun Chu; Olayemi Hafeez Rufai (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Vaccines
Vaccination is a vital component in the battle against outbreaks of infectious diseases. Recognizing parents’ reluctance to vaccinate their children is even more critical now, given the ongoing threat of a COVID-19 pandemic. Conspiracy theories, vaccination safety concerns, parental efficacy and risk perception, and a lack of confidence in science all influence intention. To investigate how these variables interact with vaccination behavior against COVID-19,  a model was developed, with psychosocial factors serving as the predictor and mistrust in science and vaccine knowledge serving as the mediator. In order to validate the model, the parents’ intentions regarding their children’s vaccination with COVID-19 were used. The study included 454 Pakistani parents who completed an online questionnaire assessing their intention to vaccinate their children.
Parents' attitudes, their acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccines for children and the contributing factors in Najran, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional survey

AUTHOR(S)
Abdullah Ibrahim Aedh

Published: August 2022   Journal: Vaccines
The COVID-19 pandemic is still ongoing, so it is critical to immunize the majority of people, including children, to achieve herd immunity against the pandemic. As parents are the ones who ultimately decide whether or not to vaccinate their children, this study was conducted to determine parental acceptance and hesitancy toward vaccinating their children against COVID-19, as well as their knowledge of and concerns regarding vaccination against COVID-19, as well as factors that might influence their willingness to vaccinate in Najran city, Saudi Arabia. Methods: In February 2022, a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study using a convenientand snowball sampling technique was carried out. Parents of children between the ages of 5 and 11 were given access to an online self-administered survey.
The effect of internet addiction and emotion regulation on trauma reactions during the COVID-19 pandemic in adolescents with anxiety disorder

AUTHOR(S)
Merve Kuz; Halit Necmi Uçar; Özlem Çiçek Zekey (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
This study examined the relationship among trauma reactions, anxiety severity, Internet addiction (IA), and emotion regulation difficulties during the COVID-19 pandemic in adolescents with anxiety disorders. The sample of study consisted of 63 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years who were diagnosed with AD and their parents. IA scores and emotional regulation difficulties were significantly higher in the group with pathological trauma reactions than the group exhibiting nonpathological trauma reactions. The trauma scores of adolescents with AD were correlated with IA, emotional regulation difficulties, and anxiety scores.
Quality of life and psychological burden of parents of children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional study during the lockdown period of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nikolaos Rikos; Andreas Mpalaskas; Maria Fragiadaki (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Nursing Reports
The current study aimed to investigate how parents of children, adolescents, and young adults with DM1 perceived quality of life and psychological burden during the lockdown period of COVID-19. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 110 parents in Greece in spring 2021. Perceived quality of life was measured using the Parent Diabetes Distress Scale, and psychological burden was measured using the Spielberger State/Trait Anxiety Inventory, and both were assessed with correlational analysis.
Day-to-day life during the COVID-19 pandemic: a longitudinal qualitative study with Canadian parents of young children

AUTHOR(S)
Caroline Sanders; Tess Amyot; Theresa J. Frank (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood
The COVID-19 pandemic brought about changes to the lives of families with young children. It has been associated with physical and psychological risk, yet the impact on younger children is poorly examined. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted the day-to-day life of parents of young children living in a small northern city in British Columbia, Canada. Ten mothers with children aged 0–5 years participated in a six-week longitudinal study between November 2020 and March 2021. This article presents data from entry and exit interviews that were analysed using Todorov's narrative theory. Three key themes were identified: (1) gaps in health services; (2) gaps in early childhood education and programs; and (3) changes to/lost social interactions.
Challenges of parents with children with intellectual and neurodevelopmental disorders during COVID-19: experiences and their impact on mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Elisa Kaltenbach; Ting Xiong; Donna Thomson (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability

Parents of children with intellectual and neurodevelopmental disorders are a highly burdened group that faces additional challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, parents of children with intellectual and neurodevelopmental disorders (N = 600) living in Canada participated in a cross-sectional online survey.

"Will it work as well on Zoom?" A natural experiment during the Covid-19 pandemic of delivering parenting groups via video conferencing or in person

AUTHOR(S)
Livia van Leuven; Maria Lalouni; Martin Forster

Published: August 2022   Journal: Journal of Child and Family Studies
While rates of child maltreatment increased during the Covid-19-pandemic, face-to-face interventions to support families got difficult to carry out due to restrictions. Meanwhile, many services do not have access to parenting programs designed for digital or remote delivery. A solution employed by some services was to use video conferencing (VC) to deliver their regular parenting programs. This study examined the effectiveness of the universal group-based parenting program ABC offered through VC instead of on-site meetings during the pandemic. Pre and post measurements were collected from 469 parents participating in either 1) ABC with VC meetings only, 2) on-site meetings only, or 3) blended – a combination of VC and on-site sessions. In addition, 74 group leaders completed a survey about their experiences of VC groups.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.