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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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376 - 390 of 488
Experiences with COVID-19 stressors and parents’ use of neglectful, harsh, and positive parenting practices in the Northeastern United States

AUTHOR(S)
Christian M. Connell; Michael J. Strambler

Published: March 2021   Journal: Child Maltreatment

This study aims to estimate household exposure to COVID-19 related stress and the association with parent report of neglectful, harsh, and positive discipline practices. Cross sectional survey data was collected from 2,068 parents in the Northeastern US. Parents reported personal and household experiences of COVID-19 stressors, their level of distress, and use of neglectful parenting and discipline practices for a randomly selected child in their home. Analyses estimated rates of COVID-19 related stress and parenting practices. Logistic regression was used to assess the relation of COVID-19 stress to parenting behaviors.

Left‐behind children's social adjustment and relationship with parental coping with children's negative emotions during the COVID‐19 pandemic in China

AUTHOR(S)
Yining Wang; Wen Liu; Weiwei Wang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Psychology
Using data collected from two provinces in China through an online survey, the current study aimed to investigate left‐behind children's emotional and academic adjustment during the COVID‐19 pandemic in China. The participants included 1780 left‐behind (960 boys) and 1500 non‐left‐behind (811 boys) children in elementary and junior high school with a mean age of 11.23. Self‐reported questionnaires concerning children's depression, loneliness, anxiety, and academic adjustment, and parents' coping with children's negative emotions were completed.
The experiences of mothers of children and young people with intellectual disabilities during the first COVID‐19 lockdown period

AUTHOR(S)
Gemma Rogers; Gisela Perez‐Olivas; Biza Stenfert Kroese (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

Recent COVID‐19 lockdown restrictions resulted in reduced access to educational, professional and social support systems for children with intellectual disabilities and their carers. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the ways mothers of children with intellectual disabilities coped during the first 2020 lockdown period.

Maintaining momentum in infant mental health research during COVID-19: adapting observational assessments

AUTHOR(S)
Stephanie Tesson; Dianne Swinsburg; Nadine A. Kasparian

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Understanding the potential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the developing parent-infant relationship is a priority, especially for medically-fragile infants and their caregivers who face distinct challenges and stressors. Observational assessments can provide important insights into parentchild behaviors and relational risk; however, stay-at-home directives and physical distancing measures associated with COVID-19 have significantly limited opportunities for in-person observational parent-infant assessment. To maintain momentum in our research program during the pandemic, this study rapidly pivoted to remote, technology-assisted parent-infant observational assessments. This commentary offers a series of strategies and recommendations to assist researchers in adapting observational parent-infant paradigms.
Risk and protective factors related to children’s symptoms of emotional difficulties and hyperactivity/inattention during the COVID-19-related lockdown in France: results from a community sample

AUTHOR(S)
Flore Moulin; Tarik El‑Aarbaoui; Joel José Herranz Bustamante (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The COVID-19 epidemic has spread worldwide since December 2019. To contain it, preventive measures including social distancing, economic shutdown, and school closures were introduced, carrying the risk of mental health burden in adults and children. Although the knowledge base regarding children’s response to trauma and adverse events in general has broadened, descriptions of their mental health during epidemics remain scarce. In particular, the role of family socioeconomic characteristics and parental mental health are poorly understood.
Study of parent’s satisfaction for online classes under lockdown due to COVID-19 in India

AUTHOR(S)
Itisha Sharma; Deepti Kiran

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Statistics and Management Systems
The Coronavirus pandemic has severely impacted all the operations that demanded physical presence. In the process of encouraging social distancing, the didactic sector has also undergone huge transformation by shifting online. There has been an orbital shift in the instructional and pedagogical technology to keep pace with the current dynamic crisis. The teachers and administration of K-12 schools are working hard to ensure quality education to students but the major stakeholder who is the parent of the child might not be satisfied. Following an extensive literature review, we realized that there is limited research on parent satisfaction with respect to online classes by schools, especially in Indian context. Parents are the ultimate stakeholders and contributors to a child’s life and future, therefore understanding their level of contentment is paramount. The research aims at understanding the level of contentment of parents with online classes offered by schools to their wards during the corona pandemic lockdown in India.
Evaluation of parents' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding self-medication for their children’s dental problems during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional survey

AUTHOR(S)
Emine Sen Tunc; Emre Aksoy; Hatice Nilden Arslan (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Oral Health
Self-medication refers to taking medicine without consultation with a doctor or dentist, and it is an important health issue, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. There are no data about parents’ SM practices for their children’s dental problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study aims to evaluate parents’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding self-medication for their children’s dental problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Turkey.
COVID-19 quarantine: psychological impact and support for children and parents

AUTHOR(S)
Francesco Demaria; Stefano Vicari

Published: March 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, national governments have imposed urgent sanitary and social measures to control the spread of the virus. One such measure is quarantine, which involves restricting people’s movement through the isolation of infected or suspected infected individuals in order to reduce the risk of new infections. Research has shown that quarantine is a psychologically stressful experience. With respect to children, lack of school and interruptions to daily routines could have a negative impact on their physical and mental health. Parents may also pass their psychological distress to children and practice inappropriate parenting behaviors, which could contribute to the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms in children.In order to prevent these negative outcomes, governments must carefully consider any their decision to impose quarantine and family social care services must work together with children’s mental health services to ensure that the experience is as tolerable and safe as possible.
Risk and protective factors related to children’s symptoms of emotional difficulties and hyperactivity/inattention during the COVID-19-related lockdown in France: results from a community sample

AUTHOR(S)
Flore Moulin; Tarik El‑Aarbaoui; Joel José Herranz Bustamante (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The COVID-19 epidemic has spread worldwide since December 2019. To contain it, preventive measures including social distancing, economic shutdown, and school closures were introduced, carrying the risk of mental health burden in adults and children. Although the knowledge base regarding children's response to trauma and adverse events in general has broadened, descriptions of their mental health during epidemics remain scarce. In particular, the role of family socioeconomic characteristics and parental mental health are poorly understood.
Families in the COVID-19 pandemic: parental stress, parent mental health and the occurrence of adverse childhood experiences—results of a representative survey in Germany

AUTHOR(S)
Claudia Calvano; Lara Engelke; Jessica Di Bella (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Parenting during the COVID-19 pandemic is highly challenging, with parents having to meet various demands simultaneously. An increase in adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) has been widely predicted, but empirical evidence is still scarce. This study aimed to (1) generate representative data on pandemic-related stress, parental stress, general stress, parental subjective and mental health, and the occurrence of ACEs; (2) identify risk factors for an increase in ACEs, and (3) provide qualitative data on parents’ experiences. A representative survey was conducted in Germany in August 2020 with 1024 parents of underage children (Mage=41.70, 50.9% female).
Child-rearing during postgraduate medical training and its relation to stress and burnout: results from a single-institution multispecialty survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marguerite W. Spruce; Alicia A. Gingrich; Amanda Phares (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Military Medicine
Child-rearing is difficult for medical trainees during the Covid-19 era, but much of the available evidence is limited to individual specialties or lacks an analysis of well-being. In light of this, this study sought to examine current perspectives across a wide range of medical specialties, determine associations with stress and burnout, and identify potential supportive solutions. After Institutional Review Board approval, a voluntary and anonymous survey was sent to all residents and fellows at a large academic medical center with a U.S. Air Force joint training agreement in 2019. Frequency tables were generated for survey responses, using χ 2 test for analysis between groups.
Psycho-emotional adjustment in parents of adolescents: a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of the impact of the COVID pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Selene Valero-Moreno; Laura Lacomba-Trejo; Alicia Tamarit (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Adolescence is a time of change and it generally entails a greater family vulnerability thus; the aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for poor emotional adjustment to COVID among parents of adolescents. 94 parents of adolescents (11–18 years old, M = 13.90, SD = 1.85) participated at different times during the state of alert in Spain. 91.5% were mothers. Their ages ranged from 35 to 63 years (M = 46.54; SD = 5.09). The variables assessed were anxiety, depression and stress (DASS), moods (MOOD), somatization (SCL) and resilience (CD-RISC). Descriptive analyses, t-tests, ANOVAs, correlations, and hierarchical regressions were performed.
Parental transfers under ambiguity

AUTHOR(S)
Yuta Saito (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Applied Economics Letters
This note introduces parental uncertainty into parent–child monetary transfers. A parent questions the probability distribution of a child’s future economic success. As a result, the parent endogenously tilts his/her subjective probability model away from an approximating probability model. In this case, parental transfers increase with model uncertainty, thereby reducing the child’s effort and probability of economic success. This theoretical result raises several empirical questions, of which two are as follows. For one thing, informed parents (e.g. those who hold the same job as their child) transfer less money, and their child exerts more effort. Another is that economic uncertainty (e.g. recessions or pandemics) prompts higher parental transfer payments and reduces the child’s effort.
Challenges in providing care for parents of transgender youth during the Coronavirus pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nathalie Szilagyi; Christy L. Olezeski

Published: February 2021   Journal: Smith College Studies in Social Work
The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful for many, increasing levels of anxiety, depression and other mental health concerns worldwide. With the spread of the virus, many youth found themselves physically isolated from their peers and confined to their homes, and medical and mental health services previously provided in person had to adapt by providing virtual sessions. The transition to virtual care created many new challenges for clinicians and patients, including some specific to transgender youth and their families. Pre-pandemic, transgender youth comprised a marginalized and vulnerable population, with elevated risk for adverse mental health outcomes. However, community support, strong group identification and family affirmation can serve as important mitigating factors. In this paper, we will discuss unique challenges encountered in working with the parents and caregivers of transgender youth during virtual visits that have the potential to interfere with development of a therapeutic alliance and the movement toward increased family acceptance. We will provide clinical case examples and propose methods through which to address difficulties and improve care.
Parental behaviors and involvement in children’s digital activities among Israeli Jewish and Arab families during the COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Galia Meoded Karabanov; Merav Asaf; Margalit Ziv (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Early Education and Development
The study explored everyday parenting behaviors and their relations to parents’ involvement in their children’s digital activities during the COVID-19 lockdown, among Israeli Jewish and Arab parents of young children. It studied parents’ behaviors through the prism of the Parenting Pentagon Model (PPM), which integrates five constructs of daily parenting behaviors that are beneficial for children’s development: Partnership between the caretakers, Parental Leadership, Love Behaviors, Encouraging Independence, and Adherence to Rules.
376 - 390 of 488

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.