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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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106 - 120 of 132
The Avon longitudinal study of parents and children: a resource for COVID-19 research: questionnaire data capture May-July 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Northstone; Daniel Smith; Claire Bowring (et al.)

Published: September 2020
The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a prospective population-based cohort study which recruited pregnant women in 1990-1992 and has followed these women, their partners and their offspring ever since. The study reacted rapidly to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, deploying an online questionnaire early on during lockdown (from 9th April to 15th May). In late May 2020, a second questionnaire was developed asking about physical and mental health, lifestyle and behaviours, employment and finances.
The hidden impact of COVID-19 on child protection and well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Ritz; Georgina O’Hare; Melissa Burgess (et al.)

Institution: Save the Children
Published: September 2020
This report is one in a series presenting findings from the Global COVID-19 Research Study. The results presented here focus on the implications for Child Protection issues, drawing on data from our representative sample of 17,565 parents/caregivers and 8,069 children in our programme participants group. Comparisons with our general public sample have been made in some places.Topics investigated include violence occurring in the home, the separation of children from their caregivers, mental health and psycho-social well-being of caregivers and children, child labour, online safety and child protection support and services. Available data was analysed and presented considering the socio-ecological model in order to highlight the interconnectedness of the broader socio-ecological environment which places children within their households and communities. This enabled the detailing of the range of associated risks and protective factors in relation to these child protection issues as well as drawing attention to the complexity of their interrelationship. Differences in impact and the needs of children by region, age, gender, disability, minority group, indicators of poverty, and more, were explored.
Virtual parent-child visitation in support of family reunification in the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jacqueline Singer; David Brodzinsky

Published: September 2020   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
The present article examines existing data on how children respond to virtual communication with parents and extended family and what practical issues and training needs are encountered when implementing virtual visits in juvenile dependency cases. During periods of sheltering in place in response to COVID-19 face-to-face visits have been largely curtailed. In their place, child welfare agencies have begun using virtual visitation through various technology platforms such as smartphones, FaceTime, Zoom, WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger and Skype, often facilitated by foster parents. A number of questions have arisen, however, about the effectiveness of virtual visitations and how best to use them as a means of supporting reunification goals.
Parents’ distress and poor parenting during COVID-19: the buffering effects of partner support and cooperative coparenting

AUTHOR(S)
Caitlin S. McRae McRae; Annette M. E. Henderson; Rachel S. T. Low (et al.)

Published: September 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic is placing considerable demands on parents that amplify the risk of poor parenting. Leveraging an ongoing longitudinal study, the current study tests whether parents’ distress during a mandated lockdown predicts residual changes in poorer parenting and identifies within-family support processes that buffer these harmful effects.
A mixed-method study of individual, couple, and parental functioning during the state-regulated COVID-19 lockdown in Spain

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Günther-Bel; Anna Vilaregut; Eduard Carratala (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Family Process
This study explored the individual and relational well-being of people confined together with their partners and/or children during the first 3 weeks of state-regulated lockdown during the recent COVID-19 outbreak in Spain.  Although correlates of psychological distress (e.g., unemployment, perceived economic risk) were relatively stable across subgroups, predictors of relationship functioning varied substantially with household/parental status (e.g., telecommuting and employment facilitated conjugal functioning only for couples with children).
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 59 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 1060-1079 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, lockdown, mental health services, parent-child relationship, psychological distress | Countries: Spain
Child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: consequences of parental job loss on psychological and physical abuse towards children

AUTHOR(S)
Monica Lawson; Megan H. Piel; Michaela Simon

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The current study investigated factors associated with child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, including parental job loss, and whether cognitive reframing moderated associations between job loss and child maltreatment.
How personality relates to distress in parents during the Covid-19 lockdown: the mediating role of child's emotional and behavioral difficulties and the moderating effect of living with other people

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Mazza; Eleonora Ricci; Daniela Marchetti (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Since the initiation of the COVID-19 lockdown, Italian parents have been forced to manage their children at home. The present study aimed at investigating the psychological distress of parents during the lockdown, identifying contributing factors.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 17 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: lockdown, mental stress, parent-child relationship, psychological distress | Countries: Italy
Women's and men's work, housework and childcare, before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Del Boca; Noemi Oggero; Paola Profeta (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
Using new survey data collected in April 2020 from a representative sample of Italian women, we analyse the effects of working arrangements due to COVID-19 on housework, childcare and home schooling among couples where both partners work. Our results show that most of the additional housework and childcare associated to COVID-19 falls on women while childcare activities are more equally shared within the couple than housework activities.
School lessons from the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Taylor

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This article draws on recent literature spawned by the Covid-19 outbreak, together with related research studies and a survey of 16 South African families undertaken in April 2020 at the start of the national lockdown. A qualitative case study method was adopted and telephonic interviews conducted with the main caregiver and up to two children in each family in order to understand how learning at home might be promoted.
Contextualizing parental/familial influence on physical activity in adolescents before and during COVID-19 pandemic: a prospective analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Gilic; Ljerka Ostojic; Marin Corluka (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Children
Parental and familial factors influence numerous aspects of adolescents’ lives, including their physical activity level (PAL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in PAL which occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to evaluate influence of sociodemographic and parental/familial factors on PAL levels before and during pandemic in adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 24 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Bosnia And Herzegovina
Child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic: consequences of parental job loss on psychological and physical abuse towards children

AUTHOR(S)
Monica Lawson; Megan H. Piel; Michaela Simon

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The current study investigated factors associated with child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, including parental job loss, and whether cognitive reframing moderated associations between job loss and child maltreatment.
Supporting families to protect child health: parenting quality and household needs during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Leslie E. Roos; Emily Cameron; Jennifer Lisa Penner Protudjer (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Supportive parenting is critical for promoting healthy child development in the face of stressors, such as those occurring during COVID-19. Here, we address a knowledge gap regarding specific household risk factors associated with parenting quality during the pandemic and incorporate first-person accounts of family challenges and needs. Lower quality parenting during COVID-19 is associated with multiple household and pandemic risk factors, with caregiver depression consistently linked to parentchild
relationship disruptions. Focused efforts are needed to address caregiver mental health to protect child health as part of the pandemic response.
Impact of social distancing on the mental health of parents and children in Qatar

AUTHOR(S)
Mohamed Abdelrahman; Duaa Al-Adwan; Youssef Hassan

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Vaccine
This study investigates the effects of COVID-19-related social distancing practices on parents and children’s mental health and explored the roles parental activities with children and coping strategies among families in Qatar. The path analysis shows that social distancing practices influence both parents’ and children’s mental health through parents’ activities with children and their coping strategies. Our findings reveal how living under stressful conditions such as COVID-19 could enhance the mental health of family members.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 33 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, mental health, parent-child relationship | Countries: Qatar
Emerging health challenges for children with physical disabilities and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic: the ECHO French survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marine Cacioppo; Sandra Bouvier; Rodolphe Bailly (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

The daily lives of children with physical disabilities and their families have been significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The children face health risks, especially mental, behavioral, social and physical risks. This study aimed to identify potential healthcare issues relating to the wellbeing of disabled children, continuity of rehabilitation and medical care, and parental concerns during the COVID-19 lockdown.

The interplay between mothers’ and children behavioral and psychological factors during COVID-19: an Italian study

AUTHOR(S)
Elisa Di Giorgio; Daniela Di Riso; Giovanna Mioni (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Italy has been the first nation outside of Asia to face the COVID-19 outbreak. To limit viral transmission of infection, by March 10th, 2020, the Italian Government has ordered a national lockdown, which established home confinement, home (smart) working, and temporary closure of non-essential businesses and schools. The present study investigated how these restrictive measures impacted mothers and their pre-school children’s behavioral habits (i.e., sleep timing and quality, subjective time experience) and psychological well-being (i.e., emotion regulation, self-regulation capacity). An online survey was administered to 245 mothers with pre-school children (from 2 to 5 years).
106 - 120 of 132

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.