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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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196 - 210 of 241
A tale of two parts of Switzerland: regional differences in the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on parents

AUTHOR(S)
Michelle Seiler; Georg Staubli; Julia Hoeffe (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health

This study aimed to document the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on regions within a European country. Parents arriving at two pediatric emergency departments (EDs) in North of Switzerland and two in South of Switzerland completed an online survey during the first peak of the pandemic (April–June 2020). They were asked to rate their concern about their children or themselves having COVID-19.

Parental psychological distress and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination: a cross-sectional survey in Shenzhen, China

AUTHOR(S)
Yucheng Xu; Ruiyin Zhang; Zhifeng Zhou

Published: June 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

Parental attitudes towards the vaccines play a key role in the success of the herd immunity for the COVID-19. Psychological health seems to be a controversial determinant of vaccine hesitancy and remains to be investigated. This study attempted to measure parental psychological distress, attitudes towards the COVID-19 vaccine, and to explore the potential associations. An online survey using convenience sampling method was conducted among parents within the school public health network of Shenzhen. Demographic information and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination were collected. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4) was applied to measure psychological distress.

Those in the shadow of the pandemic: impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on the mental health of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents

AUTHOR(S)
Baris Guller; Ferhat Yaylaci; Damla Eyuboglu

Published: May 2021   Journal: International Journal of Developmental Disabilities
This study aimed to investigate the emotional and behavioral responses of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents during the recent novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and the associated factors. Our study included 299 children and adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders and 299 mothers or fathers. Participant groups were as follows: autism spectrum disorder (n = 131, 43.8%); intellectual disability (n = 103, 34.4%); specific learning disorder (n = 46, 15.4%); and communication disorder (n = 19, 6.4%).
Preschool parents’ views of distance learning during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Michele L. Stites; Susan Sonneschein; Samantha H. Galczyk

Published: May 2021   Journal: Early Education and Development
While research is beginning to emerge about the educational landscape during COVID-19, little attention has been paid to preschool. This mainly descriptive study examined U.S. parents’ views on distance learning for their preschool children during the COVID-19 crisis. Using a survey distributed via social media groups to U.S. parents of preschoolers (N = 166), it examined the following: the types of activities parents engaged in, obstacles to preschool distance learning, and the types of resources parents needed.
Parents’ willingness and attitudes concerning the COVID-19 vaccine: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Meltem Yılmaz; Mustafa Kursat Sahin (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: The International Journal of Clinical Practice

This study aimed to evaluate the parents’ willingness and attitudes concerning the COVID-19 vaccine. This cross-sectional study was performed using a self-administered online survey, covering parents’ and their children's characteristics, parents’ willingness and attitudes towards the COVID-19 vaccine. A total of 1035 parents participated.

Parents’ intention to get vaccinated and to have their child vaccinated against COVID-19: cross-sectional analyses using data from the KUNO-Kids health study

AUTHOR(S)
Susanne Brandstetter; Merle M. Böhmer; Maja Pawellek (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
A COVID-19 vaccine can be an important key for mitigating the spread of the pandemic, provided that it is accepted by a sufficient proportion of the population. This study investigated parents’ intention to get vaccinated and to have one’s child vaccinated against COVID-19. In May 2020, 612 parents participating with their child in the KUNO-Kids health study completed an online survey.
Improving the model of family-school interaction with the help of digital education

AUTHOR(S)
Jamileh Alamolhoda

Published: May 2021   Journal: Contemporary School Psychology
The study of the consequences of school education has proved the need for reinforcement family interventions in school education and also the need to improve the model of family-school interaction (FSI). The family and the school are two complementary educational institutions. But the emergence of digital technologies and especially the critical situation caused by the outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19) has paved the way for their further interaction. However, both the family and the school have faced serious changes in their educational tasks and functions, and have raised questions about the possibility of upgrading the FSI and possible changes in curriculum. The present study is qualitative and the data collection tool is in-depth interview. Participators in the study are 24 teachers and parents of 6–11-year-old male and female learners who are involved in virtual education.
Disengaged, positive, or negative: parents’ attitudes toward learning from home amid COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ahmad R. Pratama; Firman M. Firmansyah

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Child and Family Studies
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many countries to close their schools and to change their education system to adopt the learning from home (LFH) method, which arguably requires more direct involvement from parents to succeed. This study explored parent’s attitudes toward LFH policy based on a survey of 261 participants from 16 provinces in Indonesia. Employing latent class analysis, we revealed three distinct groups of parents with unique compounds of attitudes toward LFH (i.e., disengaged, positive, and negative). Disengaged parents neither consider LFH useful, nor do they see it as demanding. In contrast, the other two groups of parents have quite the opposite views on the usefulness and demandingness of LFH. Further analysis using multinomial logistic regression revealed that older parents from low-income households tend to be disengaged while fathers of young children tend to have negative attitudes toward LFH. Interestingly, the ownership of a personal computer at home seems to be a key indicator of parents with positive attitudes toward LFH after controlling for other demographic factors. How the findings provide a firsthand insight on the existence of digital divide by highlighting the importance of access to personal computers at home is further discussed.
How is the COVID-19 lockdown impacting the mental health of parents of school-age children in the UK? A cross-sectional online survey

AUTHOR(S)
Austen El-Osta; Aos Alaa; Iman Webber (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
This study aims to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on feelings of loneliness and social isolation in parents of school-age children. An online survey explored the impact of lockdown on the mental health of parents with school-age children, and in particular about feelings of social isolation and loneliness. Associations between the UCLA Three-Item Loneliness Scale (UCLATILS), the Direct Measure of Loneliness (DMOL) and the characteristics of the study participants were assessed using ordinal logistic regression models.
Family–school partnerships in the age of Covid-19: reasons for optimism amidst a global pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Colin Forster

Published: May 2021   Journal: Contemporary Issues in Practitioner Education
This article reports on research undertaken in May and June 2020, during the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic when schools in England were still closed to the majority of children. The research sought to explore the impact of the so-called ‘lockdown’ on family–school partnerships. Research shows such partnerships make an important contribution to the effective education of children and young people, potentially leading to improved behaviour, engagement and learning outcomes. The study was conducted as a short online survey, circulated through social media and email, which invited teachers, school leaders and others working in primary and secondary schools to share their experiences of family–school partnership during this time. Analysis of the data showed that schools had made considerable efforts to maintain communication and support for all families, particularly those deemed ‘hard-to-reach’, and many participants reported that family–school partnerships had actually been strengthened through this testing period of time.
Mothers’ and fathers’ parenting attitudes during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa K. Forbes; Margaret R. Lamar; Megan Speciale (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Current Psychology
Attitudes about parenting are derived from early socialization of gender role norms and often include intensive parenting beliefs, which give mothers an outsized role in parenting. This study examined the differences in intensive parenting beliefs among cisgender mothers and fathers during the United States COVID-19 response. Data from a sample of 1048 mothers and fathers were collected during March and April 2020 to understand parenting beliefs. Results indicated that some demographic factors, including gender and ethnicity, impact intensive parenting beliefs. Additionally, the number of COVID-19 cases in a state, along with school closure length, was related to intensive parenting beliefs.
Perceived family adaptability and cohesion and depressive symptoms: a comparison of adolescents and parents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Mengxue Li; Lili Li; Feng Wu (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

This study aimed to compare the differences of depressive symptoms and perceived family cohesion and adaptability between adolescents and parents during the pandemic; to explore the association between depressive symptoms and family cohesion and adaptability. A total of 8,940 adolescents (45.77% males; Mean age=15.31±0.018 years old) and their parents (24.34% males; Mean age=40.78±0.60 years old) from Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China, participated in the survey and completed several questionnaires online.

Subjective wellbeing in parents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth M. Westrupp; Mark A. Stokes; Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
This paper aimed to examine (1) the subjective wellbeing of Australian parents raising children and adolescents (0–18 years) during April 2020 ‘stage three’ COVID-19 restrictions, in comparison with parents assessed over 18-years prior to the pandemic; and (2) socio-demographic and COVID-19 predictors of subjective wellbeing during the pandemic.
Emergency remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic: parents experiences and perspectives

AUTHOR(S)
Ozge Misirli; Funda Ergulec

Published: March 2021   Journal: Education and Information Technologies
he coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused an emergency transform from traditional to distance learning at all levels of education, which is called emergency remote teaching. To explore parents’ views on students’ experiences of remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic, and their experience and perspectives toward remote teaching during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic, a questionnaire was developed and distributed to parents who have at least one child who had attended a face-to-face learning environment prior to school closures and started remote teaching during the pandemic. 983 parents participated in the study. The parents’ views on students’ experiences of remote teaching during the COVID19 pandemic, their experiences and perspectives toward remote teaching were discussed. The results suggested that the remote teaching process has been challenging for both students and parents.
A recipe for madness: parenthood in the era of Covid‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Laurel Elder; Steven Greene

Published: March 2021   Journal: Social Science Quarterly

This article seeks to understand the economic, mental health, and political impacts on American parents in the era of Covid‐19. It draws on survey data from a diverse national sample collected in September 2020 and employs multivariate analysis to explore how Covid‐19 has uniquely affected the attitudes and life experiences of American parents.

196 - 210 of 241

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.