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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 36
Screening of COVID-19 in outpatient children with cancer or solid organ transplantation: preliminary report

AUTHOR(S)
Thaís Lira Cleto-Yamane; Gustavo Rodrigues-Santos; Maria Clara de Magalhães-Barbosa

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
Clinical presentation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in pediatric immunosuppressed patients is unknown. Emerging data describe a milder or asymptomatic course in children compared with adults in this scenario. This paper presents the seroprevalence and clinical features of coronavirus disease 2019 in a prospective cohort of 114 immunosuppressed children and adolescents from three groups: kidney transplantation, liver transplantation, and cancer patients.
Increased risk of rhinovirus infection in children during the coronavirus disease‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Emi Takashita; Chiharu Kawakami ; Tomoko Momoki (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses

Coronavirus disease (COVID‐19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2), was first detected in Japan in January 2020 and has spread throughout the country. Previous studies have reported that viral interference among influenza virus, rhinovirus, and other respiratory viruses can affect viral infections at the host and population level. To investigate the impact of COVID‐19 on influenza and other respiratory virus infections, this study analyzed clinical specimens collected from 2244 patients in Japan with respiratory diseases between January 2018 and September 2020.

COVID-19 impacts on families of color and families of children with asthma

AUTHOR(S)
Ashley H. Clawson; Cara N. Nwankwo; Alexandra L. Blair (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
This cross-sectional study quantified differences in (a) social determinants of health (SDOH) and perceived changes in SDOH during the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and (b) COVID-19 psychosocial impacts across four groups: (a) non-Hispanic White (NHW) parents of children with asthma, (b) Black, Indigenous, or other People of Color (BIPOC) parents of healthy children, (c) BIPOC parents of children with asthma, and (d) NHW parents of healthy children (referent). The NIMHD Framework was used to identify SDOHs that may change for families during COVID-19.
COVID-19 management in pediatrics

AUTHOR(S)
Magalie L. Alcindor; FitzGerald Alcindor; Kristy E. Richard

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a deadly global pandemic, with scientific efforts improving our understanding of this novel coronavirus. No proven disease-specific therapies exist, although 2 vaccines have been recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration under emergency use authori-zation, and several others are in development or phase III clinical trial testing. COVID-19 presents in greater severity in the medically fragile, obese, elderly, and socially disadvantaged, and children in general are less affected. All children are at risk, but those with comorbidities and neonates are more susceptible. The multisystem inflammatory syndrome is a severe version which can present in any child with a recent COVID-19 infection. The face of the pandemic has been changing in the last few months, with recent increasing cases,virus mutations, and onset of vaccination. This article provides COVID-19 management for children and adolescents and implications for nursing and advanced practice providers.
School attendance, asthma risk, and COVID-19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Elissa M. Abrams; Marcus Shaker; Matthew Greenhawt (et al.)

Published: March 2021
In the face of tremendous uncertainty during the current pandemic, there is a need for clear and consistent recommendations and an understanding of the evidence in general, and for families of children with allergic conditions. A common concern of parents of children with asthma is the risk that in-person learning poses during the pandemic. This Rostrum examines the actual risk of in-person learning among children with asthma during novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the discrepancy between perceived and actual risk, the contributing factors to this discrepancy, and possible solutions to narrow this divide.
The impact of the lockdown and the re-opening of schools and day cares on the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections in children: a nationwide register study in Finland

AUTHOR(S)
Marjut Haapanen; Marjo Renko; Miia Artama (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Nationwide restrictions started in Finland in March to prevent the spread of COVID-19, leading to school and day care closures. The aim of this study is to describe the effect of closures and re-openings on the respiratory pathogen epidemiology. Laboratory-confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); influenza (A & B); parainfluenza-, adeno-, and rhinoviruses; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children were collected from the National Infectious Disease Register over the period of 2017–2020. Weekly incidences (weeks 1 to 35) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated per 100 000 children in 2020 and compared by incidence rate ratios (IRRs) to corresponding periods in 2017−2019.
Factors linked to severe outcomes in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) in the USA: a retrospective surveillance study

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph Y. Abrams; Matthew E. Oster; Shana E. Godfred-Cato (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a newly identified and serious health condition associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinical manifestations vary widely among patients with MIS-C, and the aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with severe outcomes.
The importance of advancing severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 vaccines in cildren

AUTHOR(S)
Carol M. Kao; Walter A. Orenstein; Evan J. Anderson

Published: February 2021   Journal: Clinical Infectious Diseases
While the role of children in the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains to be defined, children likely play an important role based on our knowledge of other respiratory viruses. Children are more likely to be asymptomatic or have milder symptoms and less likely to present for healthcare and be tested for SARS-CoV-2. Thus, our current estimates are likely under-representative of the true burden of SARS-CoV-2 in children. Given the potential direct benefit of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in children and the substantial indirect benefit through community protection, or “herd immunity,” this study argues that planning and implementation of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines should include children.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 72 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 515-518 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: disease transmission, respiratory diseases, vaccination, vaccination policies, infectious disease, COVID-19
Differences in immune responses between children and adults with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Yuan; Qiu-peng Wang; Dan Sun (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Current Medical Science
Over 85 590 000 individuals have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Although there have been an increasing number of reports on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it is unclear why infected children show milder symptoms than adults. A retrospective case study was performed at two designated hospitals for COVID-19. Patients (56 children and 63 adults) with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and mild pneumonia were randomly enrolled in this study. The median age of the children was 7.0 years, and 51.79% of them were boys. The median age of the adults was 57 years, and 47.62% were men. The most common symptoms were fever, cough, sputum and diarrhoea. There were no significant differences in symptoms between children and adult patients.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 58-61 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, immunization, respiratory diseases, infectious disease, COVID-19 | Countries: China
Update on SARS-CoV-2 infection in children

AUTHOR(S)
Marlos Melo Martins; Arnaldo Prata-Barbosa; Antônio José Ledo Alves da Cunha (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Paediatrics and International Child Health
Despite the worldwide spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19), knowledge of the different clinical presentations, ways of transmission, severity and prognosis in children and adolescents is limited. An increasing number of reports describe some of these characteristics in this age range. A non-systematic review was undertaken using MEDLINE (PubMed), LILACS (VHL), Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane and CAPES Portal databases from 1 January until 30 September 2020 with the search terms SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, child, children, youth, adolescent and newborn to identify the more recent clinical aspects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children.
‘Stay at home’: is it good or not for house dust mite sensitized children with respiratory allergies?

AUTHOR(S)
Esra Yucel; Ayse Suleyman; Zeynep Hizli Demirkale

Published: February 2021   Journal: PAI : Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Lockdown was imposed for children for 75 days in Turkey to limit the spread of COVID‐19. During this period children have to stay indoors, which might probably increase their exposures to indoor allergens and pollutants. Besides, reduced exposures to respiratory tract infections and outdoor pollutants might be favorable outcomes of this lockdown period. This study evaluated the effects of the lockdown on house dust mite (HDM) sensitized children with respiratory allergies.
Childhood asthma outcomes during the COVID‐19 pandemic: findings from the PeARL multi‐national cohort

AUTHOR(S)
Nikolaos G. Papadopoulos; Alexander G. Mathioudakis; Adnan Custovic (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Allergy
The interplay between COVID‐19 pandemic and asthma in children is still unclear. This article evaluated the impact of COVID‐19 pandemic on childhood asthma outcomes.
Comparison of acute pneumonia caused by SARS-COV-2 and other respiratory viruses in children: a retrospective multi-center cohort study during COVID-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Guang-Li Ren; Xian-Feng Wang; Jun Xu (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Military Medical Research
Until January 18, 2021, coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has infected more than 93 million individuals and has caused a certain degree of panic. Viral pneumonia caused by common viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus, and parainfluenza viruses have been more common in children. However, the incidence of COVID-19 in children was significantly lower than that in adults. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical manifestations, treatment and outcomes of COVID-19 in children compared with those of other sources of viral pneumonia diagnosed during the COVID-19 outbreak.
Serious infectious events and ibuprofen administration in pediatrics: a narrative review in the era of COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Lucia Quaglietta; Massimo Martinelli; Annamaria Staiano

Published: January 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Despite its recognized efficacy and tolerability profile, during the last decade a rise of adverse events following ibuprofen administration in children has been reported, including a possible role in worsening the clinical course of infections. Our aim was to critically evaluate the safety of ibuprofen during the course of pediatric infectious disease in order to promote its appropriate use in children.
Distinct antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in children and adults across the COVID-19 clinical spectrum

AUTHOR(S)
Stuart P. Weisberg; Thomas J. Connors; Yun Zhu (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Nature Immunology
Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 caused by the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are associated with age. Adults develop respiratory symptoms, which can progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the most severe form, while children are largely spared from respiratory illness but can develop a life-threatening multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Here, we show distinct antibody responses in children and adults after SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.