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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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676 - 690 of 809
Flexibility in individual funding schemes: how well did Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme support remote learning for students with disability during COVID‐19?

AUTHOR(S)
Sophie Yates; Helen Dickinson; Catherine Smith

Published: November 2020   Journal: Social Policy & Administration

Individualized funding schemes are designed to offer people with disability greater choice and control over the services they receive. This research reports on a survey of over 700 families to explore how Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) supported children and young people and their families to learn remotely during COVID‐19. NDIS funding to support education during the first COVID‐19 lockdown period forms an important case study of the flexibility of individualized funding schemes.

Inequalities in children's experiences of home learning during the COVID‐19 lockdown in England

AUTHOR(S)
Alison Andrew; Sarah Cattan; Monica Costa Dias

Published: November 2020   Journal: Fiscal Studies
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home‐learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID‐19 lockdown with pre‐lockdown data from the UK Time Use Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown, and to gauge the extent to which changes in time use and learning practices during this period are likely to reinforce the already large gaps in educational attainment between children from poorer and better‐off families.
Factors associated with caregiver preferences for children's return to school during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Christine A. Limbers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of School Health

Amid the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is a need to understand caregiver preferences for their children's instructional format for the start of the 2020 to 2021 academic year. The purpose of the current study was to assess caregiver preferences for on‐campus versus virtual learning at home during the fall and factors associated with these preferences. Participants were caregivers of 4436 children and adolescents who were enrolled in pre‐kindergarten through high school at a large, public school district in Texas. Caregivers were asked to complete an anonymous, online survey about their initial preferences for their student's back to the school learning environment.

Modeling the impact of school reopening on SARS-CoV-2 transmission using contact structure data from Shanghai

AUTHOR(S)
Benjamin Lee; John P. Hanley; Sarah Nowak (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMC Public Health

Mathematical modeling studies have suggested that pre-emptive school closures alone have little overall impact on SARS-CoV-2 transmission, but reopening schools in the background of community contact reduction presents a unique scenario that has not been fully assessed. This study adapted a previously published model using contact information from Shanghai to model school reopening under various conditions. It investigated different strategies by combining the contact patterns observed between different age groups during both baseline and “lockdown” periods. It also tested the robustness of this strategy to the assumption of lower susceptibility to infection in children under age 15 years.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health policy, lockdown, public health, school attendance | Countries: China
COVID-19 social isolation in Brazil: effects on the physical activity routine of families with children

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina dos Santos Cardoso De Sá; André Pombo; Carlos Luz (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Revista paulista de pediatria
This study aims to identify how Brazilian families with children aged under 13 years face the period of social isolation resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, especially regarding the time spent on physical activity (PA), intellectual activity, games, outdoor activities and screen. An anonymous online survey was launched on March 24, 2020 in Brazil to assess how families with children aged up to 12 years are adjusting their daily routines to this situation. In the survey, each family reported the daily time each child spent in sedentary activity (sum of intellectual activities, play time on screen, playing without PA) and PA (sum of playing with PA and PA).
Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards COVID-19 among primary school students in Hubei Province, China

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Xue; Xinyan Xie; Qi Liu (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children and youth services review
This study was aimed to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among school-aged children in the Hubei province when children were being confined to their homes. The questionnaire included questions of KAP about COVID-19, depressive and anxiety symptoms scales. Multivariable generalized linear regressions models were applied to estimate the unstandardized regression coefficients (β) of KAP.
Bangladesh: iMMAP/DFS COVID-19: situation analysis
Institution: iMMAP
Published: November 2020
COVID-19 infection rates across Bangladesh are relatively stable and well below the peak in July/August; testing has also increased. Most national COVID-19 containment measures have been rescinded, but public health measures such as masks are still in place, and schools remain closed. In Cox's Bazar, COVID-19 infection rates have dropped significantly, but stringent protocols to prevent the virus's spread remain for humanitarian actors working in the camps.
School reopening during COVID-19 pandemic: considering students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Joline E. Brandenburg; Lainie K. Holman; Susan D. Apkon (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Over 80% of the children in the world have had their education impacted by COVID-19. For children with disabilities who receive special education services, access to in-person education and other resources at school is particularly important. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for students to attend school in person, without specifics for how children with disabilities can safely return to school. To appropriately plan and accommodate children with disabilities we must prioritize safety, allow for adherence to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and preserve essential school staff. The less cumbersome default of confining students with disabilities to home is not acceptable. This article provides an outline describing why Individual Education Plans and 504 plans are important, how they are related to the COVID-19 pandemic, and recommendations for measures to help with safe return to school for children with disabilities.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 13 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 425-431 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, disabled children, educational policy, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: United States
COVID-19 pandemic: increased risk for psychopathology in children and adolescents?

AUTHOR(S)
Esther Via; Xavier Estrada-Prat; Jordina Tor (et al.)

Published: November 2020
Abstract COVID-19 pandemic is prompting multiple stressors-including control strategies such as lockdown- which may impact child and adolescent mental health. 1,529 caregivers answered an online questionnaire about emotional and behavioral symptoms of youths (4-18 years old) using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC).
Strengthening the online education ecosystem in India

AUTHOR(S)
Rammohan Khanapurkar; Shalini Bhorkar; Ketan Dandare (et al.)

Published: November 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the formal schooling system in India, as it has across the globe, causing massive pressure on the online education sector. This paper analyses the state of digitalised education in India. It outlines current government guidelines on digital-mode schooling, and uses the case of Maharashtra’s five-year-old efforts at digitalising government schools to gauge preparedness for implementing the guidelines. It highlights systemic weaknesses in educators’ pedagogical capacities, critiques the assumption that the availability of digital tools is sufficient to cater to the requirements of online education, and calls for the creation of policies on online education that are context-specific.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 45 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: India | Publisher: Observer Research Foundation
COVID-19: a one-way ticket to a global childhood obesity crisis?

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Cuschieri; Stephan Grech

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders
Obesity is a global epidemic based on three major pillars of (i) genetic (ii) behavioural and (iii) environmental determinants. The latter two pillars have been challenged during the course of the COVID-19 pandemic across all population age groups including children. The closure of schools resulted in decreased organised physical activity, increase in sedentary lifestyle and screen time with the possibility of stress-induced indulgence in high calorie dense and sugary foods, resulting in higher susceptibility to weight gain. The uncertainty faced by many Northern Hemisphere governments as the new scholastic year looms closer whether to open schools again or not further enhances the stress on the children and their family.
Anxiety, depression and PTSD among children and their parent during 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China

AUTHOR(S)
Jinming Yue; Xueyan Zang; Yunying Le (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Current Psychology
Home quarantine may lead to families developing a variety of psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological status of children and their parent during 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China. Data were collected from children (n = 1360) and their parent (n = 1360) in China using online survey during February 2020. Demographic information, media exposure, and psychological status including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed using self-report measures.
Vulnerability and resilience in children during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Winnie W. Y. Tso; Rosa S. Wong; Keith T. S. Tung (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a profound impact on the health and development of children worldwide. There is limited evidence on the impact of COVID-19 and its related school closures and disease-containment measures on the psychosocial wellbeing of children; little research has been done on the characteristics of vulnerable groups and factors that promote resilience. This research conducted a large-scale cross-sectional population study of Hong Kong families with children aged 2–12 years.
Barriers and facilitators to changes in adolescent physical activity during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kwok Ng; Jemima Cooper; Fiona McHale

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
COVID-19 restrictions reduced adolescents’ opportunities for physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine how adolescent PA changed during school closures, to identify the key barriers and facilitators for these changes during lockdown and to use this information to understand how to manage future crises’ situations positively to prevent physical inactivity.
COVID-19 and children: how a global pandemic is changing the lives of children in Albania & Kosovo: a mixed method study
Institution: World Vision Albania
Published: November 2020
The disease was confirmed to have reached Albania on March 8 2020 (WHO, 2020d) and Kosovo on March 13 2020 (Ministry of Health, 2020) when the first case respectively was confirmed. The virus, known to its very fast spread ability, forced governments to take drastic measures in order to contain it. Lockdown measures were imposed and the lives of girls and boys, families and communities in Albania & Kosovo changed drastically as health systems buckled, borders closed, and schools and businesses shuttered under the pressure of the crisis of COVID 19. The most vulnerable families and their children was hardest hit in such crises. Due to pandemic suffering of those living in fragile contexts already facing difficulties from economic distress, conflict, instability or natural disaster and great injustices has further increased.
676 - 690 of 809

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.