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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 183
Perceived family adaptability and cohesion and depressive symptoms: a comparison of adolescents and parents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Mengxue Li; Lili Li; Feng Wu (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

This study aimed to compare the differences of depressive symptoms and perceived family cohesion and adaptability between adolescents and parents during the pandemic; to explore the association between depressive symptoms and family cohesion and adaptability. A total of 8,940 adolescents (45.77% males; Mean age=15.31±0.018 years old) and their parents (24.34% males; Mean age=40.78±0.60 years old) from Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China, participated in the survey and completed several questionnaires online.

Addressing the clinical impact of COVID-19 on pediatric mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Bartek; Jessica L. Peck; Dawn Garzon (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Health Care
The novel coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic impacts the daily lives of families around the world. Sequelae are not limited to physical consequences of medical complications, but extend into social, emotional, spiritual, and psychological health. Interventions including mask wearing and physical distancing are intended to prevent viral spread but have an unintended negative effect on mental health and child development because of social isolation. Though it is too early to know the full impact of the pandemic on this generation of children, practicing pediatric clinicians are well positioned to help young people recover and thrive despite the challenges presented by the pandemic. The purpose of this article is to review emerging evidence on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in children, and to discuss practical steps and interventions that can be used in primary care to foster resilience in youth and their families.
Socio-demographic disparities in knowledge, practices, and ability to comply with COVID-19 public health measures in Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Gabrielle Brankston; Eric Merkley; David N. Fisman (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Canadian Journal of Public Health

The effectiveness of public health interventions for mitigation of the COVID-19 pandemic depends on individual attitudes, compliance, and the level of support available to allow for compliance with these measures. The aim of this study was to describe attitudes and behaviours towards the Canadian COVID-19 public health response, and identify risk-modifying behaviours based on socio-demographic characteristics. A cross-sectional online survey was administered in May 2020 to members of a paid panel representative of the Canadian population by age, gender, official language, and region of residence. A total of 4981 respondents provided responses for indicators of self-reported risk perceptions, attitudes, and behaviours towards COVID-19 public health measures

The impact of school closure and social isolation on children in vulnerable families during COVID-19: a focus on children’s reactions

AUTHOR(S)
Linda Larsen; Maren Sand Helland; Tonje Holt

Published: March 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
For children the consequences of the COVID-19 public health measures may have long-term efects into adulthood. By exploring children’s reactions more broadly, we are better placed to understanding the breadth of implications of home school and social isolation under COVID-19. The present study explored how COVID-19 related variables, namely, home school experience, child perceived family stress and instability, screen time use, missing friends and worry about virus infection are associated with children’s emotional, somatic/cognitive and worry reactions, respectively. A total of 442 children (M=11.43 years, SD=2.59) from the longitudinal FamilieForSK-study participated and a series of hierarchical linear regression models were applied controlling for background variables including children’s psychological vulnerability.
Understanding the perceived psychological distress and health outcomes of children during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gyanesh Kumar Tiwari; Ajit Kumar Singh; Priyanka Parihar

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Educational and Developmental Psychologist

The study explored the impacts of restrictions on the perceived psychological distress and health outcomes in children by their mothers who acted as their full-time caregivers during the pan-India lockdown after the outbreak of COVID-19. A narrative qualitative research design was used and a purposive heterogeneous sample of 20 mothers of children aged 9–11 years were chosen, who were in a full-time caregiving role. Data obtained through a telephonic semi-structured interview were analysed using Narrative Thematic Method.

Unpaid work and care during COVID-19: subjective experiences of same-sex couples and single mothers in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Lyn Craig; Brendan Churchill

Published: March 2021   Journal: Gender & Society
This paper draws on data from Work and Care During COVID-19, an online survey of Australians during pandemic lockdown in May 2020 (n = 2,722). It focuses on how sub-samples of lesbian, gay, and bisexual mothers and fathers in couples (n = 280) and single mothers (n = 480) subjectively experienced unpaid work and care during lockdown compared with heterosexual mothers and fathers in couples, and with partnered mothers, respectively. During the pandemic, non-heterosexual fathers’ subjective reports were less negative than those of their heterosexual counterparts, but differences between heterosexual and lesbian/bisexual mothers were more mixed. Unlike their partnered counterparts, more single mothers reported feeling satisfied than before with their balance of paid and unpaid work and how they spent their time overall during the pandemic, perhaps because they avoided partnership conflicts and particularly benefited from relaxed commuting and child care deadlines.
Gender, parenting, and the rise of remote work during the pandemic: implications for domestic inequality in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Allison Dunatchik; Kathleen Gerson; Jennifer Glass (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Gender & Society
This study examines how the shift to remote work altered responsibilities for domestic labor among partnered couples and single parents. The study draws on data from a nationally representative survey of 2,200 US adults, including 478 partnered parents and 151 single parents, in April 2020. The closing of schools and child care centers significantly increased demands on working parents in the United States, and in many circumstances reinforced an unequal domestic division of labor.
Adding salt to wounds”: parentification among children living with parents with mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic and the role of social workers

AUTHOR(S)
Ebenezer Cudjoe; Debora Daisy Kwabia; Marcus Yu Lung Chiu (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
Children living with a parent with mental illness experience challenges as some may take on the roles of their parents. Physical distancing restrictions introduced because of the COVID-19 pandemic means that many children will spend more time at home which could heighten the impact of parental mental illness. For many of these children, engaging in activities with peers provides them a sort of normal life outside their family environment. However, face-to-face interactions with others outside the family may be limited under existing public health protocols. Moreover, services for children in families where there is parental mental illness may also be limited considering limitations placed on people’s movements to reduce the rate of COVID-19 infections.
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child health and the provision of Care in Paediatric Emergency Departments: a qualitative study of frontline emergency care staff

AUTHOR(S)
Ciara Conlon; Thérèse McDonnell; Michael Barrett (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Health Services Research
The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent public health guidance to reduce the spread of the disease have wide-reaching implications for children’s health and wellbeing. Furthermore, paediatric emergency departments (EDs) have rapidly adapted provision of care in response to the pandemic. This qualitative study utilized insight from multidisciplinary frontline staff to understand 1) the changes in paediatric emergency healthcare utilization during COVID-19 2) the experiences of working within the restructured health system.
Families with children with neurodevelopmental disorders during COVID-19: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Shefaly Shorey; Lydia Siew Tiang Lau; Jia Xuan Tan (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Prolonged home isolation may lead to long-term negative consequences for both children and caregivers’ psychological wellbeing, especially in families with children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, a scoping review was conducted to identify challenges faced by caregivers of children with neurodevelopmental disorders during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to consolidate parenting interventions and guidelines.
Using mHealth Apps in health education of schoolchildren with chronic disease during COVID-19 pandemic era

AUTHOR(S)
Abdulaziz Mansoor Al Raimi; Chan Mei Chong; Li Yoong Tang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Emerging Technologies During the Era of COVID-19 Pandemic
COVID-19 significantly affects all our normal life daily especially health care services, so it’s important to find and implement innovative approaches to help individuals at a high risk to resume normal life daily. The usage of digital technologies and social networking has grown rapidly over the last decades, and these technologies are increasingly being incorporated into health education. In this study, we discussed the importance of using the mHealth technology for schoolchildren with chronic disease during the COVID-19 era, and we have used Social Learning Theory and Technology Acceptance Model from the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) as the theoretical framework for the present study. The previous study concluded the mobile device being studied is a reliable way of helping schoolchildren increase awareness their disease, but further research efforts should assess the impact of application usage on disease outcomes over a more extended follow-up period as compared to traditional care.
SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission in primary schools in England in June–December, 2020 (sKIDs): an active, prospective surveillance study

AUTHOR(S)
Shamez N. Ladhani; Frances Baawuah; Joanne Beckmann (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Little is known about the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission in educational settings. Public Health England initiated a study, COVID-19 Surveillance in School KIDs (sKIDs), in primary schools when they partially reopened from June 1, 2020, after the first national lockdown in England to estimate the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection, seroprevalence, and seroconversion in staff and students.
The impact of the lockdown and the re-opening of schools and day cares on the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections in children: a nationwide register study in Finland

AUTHOR(S)
Marjut Haapanen; Marjo Renko; Miia Artama (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Nationwide restrictions started in Finland in March to prevent the spread of COVID-19, leading to school and day care closures. The aim of this study is to describe the effect of closures and re-openings on the respiratory pathogen epidemiology. Laboratory-confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); influenza (A & B); parainfluenza-, adeno-, and rhinoviruses; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children were collected from the National Infectious Disease Register over the period of 2017–2020. Weekly incidences (weeks 1 to 35) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated per 100 000 children in 2020 and compared by incidence rate ratios (IRRs) to corresponding periods in 2017−2019.
Depression and anxiety symptoms associated with internet gaming disorder before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a longitudinal study

AUTHOR(S)
Zhaojun Teng; Halley M. Pontes; Qian Nie (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of behavioral addictions
The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has profoundly impacted aspects of human life globally. Playing videogames has been encouraged by several organizations to help individuals cope with the COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictive measures. This longitudinal study was the first to examine gaming in the context of the pandemic and its association with depressive and anxiety symptoms. The sample comprised 1,778 children and adolescents (50.7% male) who were part of the Project of School Mental Health in Southwest China.
Prevalence of COVID-19 in adolescents and youth compared with older adults in states experiencing surges

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Rumain; Moshe Schneiderman; Allan Geliebter

Published: March 2021   Journal: Plos One
There has been considerable controversy regarding susceptibility of adolescents (10–19 years) and youth (15–24 years) to COVID-19. However, a number of studies have reported that adolescents are significantly less susceptible than older adults. Summer 2020 provided an opportunity to examine data on prevalence since after months of lockdowns, with the easing of restrictions, people were mingling, leading to surges in cases. This study examined data from Departments of Health websites in six U.S. states experiencing surges in cases to determine prevalence of COVID-19, and two prevalence-related measures, in adolescents and youth as compared to older adults
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.