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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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61 - 75 of 121
Impact that the COVID-19 pandemic on routine childhood vaccinations and challenges ahead: a narrative review
Published: May 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aim to document the decline in vaccination coverage in the first months of 2020 as an indirect effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. A literature review in medical databases was performed. Overall, 143 articles were initially retrieved, out of which 48 were selected and included in the review.

Parents’ intention to get vaccinated and to have their child vaccinated against COVID-19: cross-sectional analyses using data from the KUNO-Kids health study

AUTHOR(S)
Susanne Brandstetter; Merle M. Böhmer; Maja Pawellek (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
A COVID-19 vaccine can be an important key for mitigating the spread of the pandemic, provided that it is accepted by a sufficient proportion of the population. This study investigated parents’ intention to get vaccinated and to have one’s child vaccinated against COVID-19. In May 2020, 612 parents participating with their child in the KUNO-Kids health study completed an online survey.
The Effects of the COVID 19 Pandemic on Vaccine Decisions in Pregnant Women

AUTHOR(S)
Hatice Gencer; Sevgi Özkan; Okan Vardar (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Women and Birth

Pregnancy is an important time for developing attitudes and beliefs about childhood vaccinations. Vaccinations are among the most effective way of preventing some infectious diseases. Discussions on vaccinations have increased due to the Covid-19 pandemic and there is an opportunity to give society correct information on vaccinations. The aim of the study was to determine the opinions of pregnant women on vaccinations in pregnancy and childhood and the effect of the Covid-19 pandemic on these views.

SARS-CoV-2 vaccination during pregnancy: a complex decision

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth Wenqian Wang; Jacqueline G. Parchem; Robert L. Atmar (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Open Forum Infectious Diseases
As the first severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines passed UK and US regulatory milestones in late 2020 and early 2021, multiple professional societies offered recommendations to assist pregnant and breastfeeding people as they choose whether to undergo vaccination. Despite such guidance, the lack of data describing vaccine safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in pregnant and breastfeeding people has made this decision challenging for many. However, even considering the paucity of data, the known risks of coronavirus disease 2019 during pregnancy likely outweigh the not yet fully elucidated risks of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, which have reassuring safety and efficacy profiles among nonpregnant people.
COVID-19 in children: clinical manifestations and pharmacological interventions including vaccine trials

AUTHOR(S)
Ramon Galindo; Heather Chow; Chokechai Rongkavilit

Published: May 2021   Journal: Pefiatric Clinics
Children usually present with milder symptoms of COVID-19 as compared with adults. Supportive care alone is appropriate for most children with COVID-19. Antiviral therapy may be required for those with severe or critical diseases. Currently there has been a rapid development of vaccines globally to prevent COVID-19 and several vaccines are being evaluated in children and adolescents. Currently, only Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA vaccine is approved for emergency authorization use in the pediatric population ages 16 years and older.
Changes in childhood vaccination during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Yuta Aizawa; Tomohiro Katsuta; Hiroshi Sakiyama (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Vaccine
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has greatly affected daily life. COVID-19 often causes asymptomatic or mild disease in children; however, delayed routine childhood immunization is a concern, as it could increase the risk of vaccine-preventable disease. No study has evaluated the status of childhood vaccinations in Japan during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health services, vaccination, vaccination policies | Countries: Japan
Exploration and ethical analysis of open-label pediatric vaccine trials in a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ian D. Wolfe; Angira Patel; Larry K. Kociolek (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Clinical Therapeutics
Young children will ultimately need to be vaccinated to stop the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Initial studies of vaccine were performed in adults. Randomized controlled trials are the gold standard. In the COVID-19 pandemic, many questions need to be answered about the ethics and feasibility of these trials. Given the harms of the COVID-19 pandemic and the now-known efficacy of the vaccines in adults and teens, the question of whether clinical equipoise exists for a placebo-controlled trial of vaccines in younger children remains. Parents may be reluctant to enroll children in these trials because they want their child to receive the vaccine or because they are worried about vaccines or clinical trials in general. One option for gathering data on tolerability and efficacy in children would be to use a nonrandomized trial to enroll parents willing to vaccinate their children and those who are hesitant. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such an open-label trial that could provide guidance for future pandemics.
COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among pregnant, breastfeeding and non-pregnant reproductive aged women

AUTHOR(S)
Desmond Sutton; Mary D'Alton; Yijia Zhang (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology MFM

Although mass vaccination against COVID-19 may prove to be the most efficacious end to this deadly pandemic, there remains concern and indecision among the public towards vaccination. As pregnant and reproductive-aged women account for a large proportion of the population with particular concerns regarding vaccination against COVID-19, this survey aims at investigating their current attitudes and beliefs within our own institution. To understand vaccine acceptability among pregnant, non-pregnant and breastfeeding respondents and elucidate factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance.

Expecto patronum! Leveraging the positive force of COVID-19 vaccines for pregnant and lactating individuals

AUTHOR(S)
Ann Kinga Malinowski; Wendy Whittle; Kellie Murphy (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada
For over a year, the world has been gripped by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has had far-reaching effects on society. The integrity of national health care systems has also been challenged, owing to shifts in guidance and misinformation. While initial reports suggested that pregnant people were not at increased risk of severe COVID-19 disease, current data arising from the “third wave” paint a much more concerning picture. Additionally, pregnant and lactating people were excluded from vaccine trials, which has hindered the ability of health care professionals to provide evidence-based counselling regarding the safety and efficacy of the available vaccines in these populations. This commentary reviews the current data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in pregnancy. The evidence is clear that the risks of hospitalization and severe maternal and potentially fetal morbidity from COVID-19 in pregnancy far outweigh the very minimal risks of COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy.
Vaccinating children against SARS-CoV-2

AUTHOR(S)
Jennie S. Lavine; Ottar Bjornstad; Rustom Antia

Published: May 2021   Journal: BMJ
Following widespread vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 of older adults and other highly vulnerable groups, some high income countries are now considering vaccinating children; just days ago, the US Food and Drug Administration authorized the use of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in children 12-15 years of age. Young people have been largely spared from severe covid-19 so far, and the value of childhood vaccination against respiratory viruses in general remains an open question for three reasons: the limited benefits of protection in age groups that experience only mild disease; the limited effects on transmission because of the range of antigenic types and waning vaccine induced immunity; and the possibility of unintended consequences related to differences in vaccine induced and infection induced immunity. Each issue is discussed in turn.
Acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine and associated factors among pregnant women in China: a multi-center cross-sectional study based on health belief model

AUTHOR(S)
Liyuan Tao; Ruitong Wang; Na Han (et al.)

Published: May 2021

Vaccine hesitancy has been recognized as an urgent public health issue. This study aimed to explore the acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine and related factors among pregnant women, a vulnerable population for vaccine-preventable diseases. A multi-center cross-sectional study among pregnant women was conducted in five provinces of mainland China from November 13 to 27, 2020.

The role of trauma in mothers' COVID-19 vaccine beliefs and intentions

AUTHOR(S)
Stephanie Milan; Ana Luısa B. T. Dau

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Research on COVID-19 vaccine beliefs has focused primarily on adults’ intentions to vaccinate themselves; however, many parents will also face decisions about vaccinating their children. This study examines how maternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and trauma history relate to mothers’ beliefs and intentions about the COVID-19 vaccine for themselves and their children
Childhood and adolescent vaccination in alternative settings

AUTHOR(S)
Annika M. Hofstetter; Stanley Schaffer

Published: May 2021   Journal: Academic Pediatrics
Although pediatric and adolescent vaccination rates are generally high in the United States, delayed and under-vaccination exist within certain patient populations and communities, leaving them vulnerable to vaccine-preventable diseases. One strategy for addressing this major public health concern is to offer vaccinations in nonprimary care settings such as schools, emergency rooms, hospitals, and pharmacies. This article reviews the unique advantages, challenges, and experiences regarding vaccine delivery in each alternative setting.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 21 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 7 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, immunization, immunization programmes, vaccination, vaccination policies | Countries: United States
Pediatric infectious disease group (GPIP) position paper on the immune debt of the COVID-19 pandemic in childhood, how can we fill the immunity gap?

AUTHOR(S)
Robert Cohen; Marion Ashman; Muhamed-Kheir Taha (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Infectious Diseases Now
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, reduced incidence of many viral and bacterial infections has been reported in children: bronchiolitis, varicella, measles, pertussis, pneumococcal and meningococcal invasive diseases. The purpose of this opinion paper is to discuss various situations that could lead to larger epidemics when the non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI) imposed by the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic will no longer be necessary.
Older adolescents and young adults willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine: implications for informing public health strategies

AUTHOR(S)
Tracie O. Afifi; Samantha Salmon; Tamara Taillieu (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Vaccine

The success in ending the COVID-19 pandemic rests partly on the mass uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. Little work has been done to understand vaccine willingness among older adolescents and young adults. This is important since this age group may be less likely to adhere to public health guidelines.This article aims to understand willingness of getting a vaccine and reasons for vaccine hesitancy among a sample of older adolescents and young adults.

61 - 75 of 121

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.