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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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526 - 540 of 647
The review of the international voices on the responses of the worldwide school closures policy searching during Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sardjana Orba Manullang; Erwinsyah Satria

Published: September 2020   Journal: Jurnal Iqra'
This article was to determine the voice of the international community in responding to the challenges of school closure policies during the 2019 Covid-19 pandemic. In order to understand the impacts and challenges of school closure, a series of critical searches were under taken on various online sources, for instance news updates publications , practitioners, and school reactions to unplanned global policies to obligate students learning from home.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, school attendance
Reimagining parents' educational involvement during the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Doria Daniels

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This paper argues that under emergency conditions such as Covid-19, the strategies that the official educational establishment imposed to retain the formal curriculum are unjust. The abnormal educational circumstances require that education prioritise the well-being and safety of schoolchildren. Furthermore, the parental educational role needs to be reimagined for its value in advancing educational goals.
Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 134-147 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, parental guidance, parents education, remote learning | Countries: South Africa
School lessons from the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Taylor

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This article draws on recent literature spawned by the Covid-19 outbreak, together with related research studies and a survey of 16 South African families undertaken in April 2020 at the start of the national lockdown. A qualitative case study method was adopted and telephonic interviews conducted with the main caregiver and up to two children in each family in order to understand how learning at home might be promoted.
Every child is a national (playing) asset: a portrait of a Soweto boy's contradictory worlds of play and performance before and during the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Shafika Isaacs

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This paper deliberately places under a microscope, a township boychild named Kabelo, who is labelled in the formal education system as underperforming, learning-disabled and cognitively challenged. Kabelo epitomises the pattern of boy academic underperformance in South Africa and worldwide, particularly in reading and literacy. This pattern feeds a dominant narrative about systemic learning deficits that risks the stigmatisation of academically underperforming children whose lives intersect with stubborn structural inequality, and renders them invisible as capable, playful children.
Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 116-133 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, play, social inequality | Countries: South Africa
Pros and cons of e-learning by children in rural areas during lockdown situation and ways to empower it

AUTHOR(S)
Desam Sudhakar Reddy; L. S. R. C. V. Ramesh

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Innovative technology and Research
E-learning for children in rural and remote areas during lockdown is beyond reach for many where internet facilities are poor. Since, Primary Health care of rural students remains key concern, stress on e-learning becomes prerequisite during covid-19 lockdown.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 7-9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, e-learning, lockdown, rural families | Countries: India
The influence of classroom seating arrangement on children's cognitive processes in primary school: The role of individual variables

AUTHOR(S)
Valentina Tobia; Simona Sacchi; Veronica Cerina

Published: September 2020
To date, despite the great debate regarding the best seating arrangement for learning in classrooms, no empirical studies have examined the direct effects of different seating arrangements on children’s cognitive processes. This is particularly important nowadays that the COVID-19 measures include maintaining distance in the classroom. Aim of this study was experimentally investigating the effect of changing the seating arrangement (clusters vs. rows and columns), on logical reasoning, creativity and theory of mind, in children attending primary school. Furthermore, some individual characteristics (e.g., gender, loneliness, popularity) were analysed as potential moderators.
Sensory influences in children due to online classes in the COVID  Era

AUTHOR(S)
Raghu Nandhan; Mohan Kameswaran

Published: September 2020   Journal: Otolaryngology: Open Access
School education has undergone a drastic change in recent timesdue to the Covid-19 Pandemic. The global choice today is delivering remote virtual learning thanks to the availability of internet technology and this has evolved into a 'New Normal'. Both teachers and students are slowly adapting to the art of online classes and are finding ways to engage in learning activity akin to the erstwhile schooling.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, school attendance | Countries: India
COVID-19 and schools: guidelines of the French pediatric society

AUTHOR(S)
R. Cohen; C. Delacourt; C. Gras-Le Guen (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Archives de Pédiatrie
The educational and social benefits provided by school far outweigh the risks of a possible COVID-19 contamination of children in school environments or in daycare centers. Following summer break, the back-to-school period in France is taking place in the context of an increasing viral spread and requires strict adherence to health measures to limit the risk of outbreaks in communities. Based on a critical update of the role of children in the transmission of the infection, and of children's susceptibility to infection, the French Pediatric Society published practical guidelines for school re-entry and the management of COVID-19 infections in schools.
The new classmate: an exploration of how COVID-19 affected primary schools activities in Italy

AUTHOR(S)
Ombretta Gaggi; Agnieszka Barbara Kolasinska; Silvia Mirri (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Among all the others, one of the groups of persons most affected by the restrictions applied to contrast Corona-Virus spread is surely represented by children. In particular, closing school has been an action applied by several countries (195 at the beginning of April 2020), involving 1,600,000,000 students all over the world. In Italy, distance learning activities have been adopted all over the country, at each educational stage, but with substantial differences (i.e., in terms of modalities and digital platforms). With the aim of investigating the most adopted technologies, didactic methodologies, as well as the impact on schools population, we have involved families of more than 1,000 Italian students, asking them to fill a survey. This paper presents the analysis of the results we have obtained, focusing on a delicate group of students: the ones attending primary schools, where kids learn fundamental knowledge and basic skills.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 36-41 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning, primary education, school attendance | Countries: Italy
Reintroduction of native centric education for children in COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Osobor Ikechukwu Monday

Published: September 2020   Journal: Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health
With the current effect of globalization on cultures,it is imperative to reawaken the indigenous ways of life during this lockdown. Local centric education is the preparation of children for life to avoid cultural dislocations. It is character-based ethics and native centred philosophy, aimed at teaching and learning the indigenous ways of life
Cite this research | Vol.: 49 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning, educational policy, indigenous children, school attendance
Parental perceptions of  COVID-19 pandemic: adherence to laid down containment measures

AUTHOR(S)
Osebor Ikechukwu Monday; Ezeonwu Bertilla; Joseph Ajanwaenyi Uzoma; Uwadia Omozele (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: American Journal of Pediatrics
This article aims to ascertain, the perceptions of caregivers of children on covid-19 containment measures, the need for adherence to the measures to understand the reasons for poor compliance. The interviewees expressed their difficulties and frustrations in maintaining the rigors of application of these measures but would that government should expedite action towards the discovery of Protective vaccines because of the effect these measures had on their economic means of livelihoods.
Cite this research | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 357-361 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning
Young children’s online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes

AUTHOR(S)
Chuanmei Dong; Simin Cao; Hui Lia

Published: September 2020   Journal: Children and youth services review
This study surveyed 3275 Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes around young children’s online learning during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most parents (92.7%) in the study reported that their children had online learning experiences during the pandemic, and many (84.6%) spent less than a half-hour each time. The parents generally had negative beliefs about the values and benefits of online learning and preferred traditional learning in early childhood settings. They tended to resist and even reject online learning for three key reasons: the shortcomings of online learning, young children’s inadequate self-regulation, and their lack of time and professional knowledge in supporting children’s online learning. The results suggested that the implementation of online learning during the pandemic has been problematic and challenging for families. The Chinese parents were neither trained nor ready to embrace online learning. The paper concluded with implications for policymakers and teacher education.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 118 | Issue: nov 2020 | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning, parents, school attendance | Countries: China
Evidence from Google Trends of a widening second-level digital divide in Brazil

AUTHOR(S)
Renato P. Dos Santos; M. Şahin Bülbül; Isadora Lemes

Published: September 2020   Journal: Acta scientiae

This study investigates the impact of the increasing home and mobile Internet access on the existing educational inequalities. This digital divide was critically exacerbated by the arrival of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the suspension of presential classes. Brazilian policymakers should concentrate efforts and resources in addressing this large-scale second-level digital divide, possibly by equipping educators and students with the knowledge and skills towards the educational, productive and responsible use of the Internet, as well as allowing mobile Internet access in school premises.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 22 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 121-153 | Language: Portuguese | Topics: Education | Tags: educational policy, internet | Countries: Brazil
‘People won’t die due to the disease; they will die due to hunger’: exploring the impacts of covid-19 on Rohingya and Bangladeshi adolescents in Cox’s Bazar

AUTHOR(S)
Silvia Guglielmi; Jennifer Seager; Khadija Mitu (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: August 2020
In order to inform the Bangladeshi government’s response and that of its humanitarian and development partners in Cox’s Bazar, it is essential to supplement the existing evidence base with a focus on adolescent girls and boys, given the likelihood that containment measures will have multidimensional effects on young people’s well-being in the short and medium term. This policy brief draws on virtual research findings carried out with adolescent girls and boys in May and June 2020 and also presents priority policy and programming implications.
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID‐19 on children's physical and mental well‐being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
Prolonged school closures are one of the most disruptive forces in the COVID‐19 era. School closures have upended life for children and families, and educators have been forced to determine how to provide distance learning. Schools are also an essential source of nonacademic supports in the way of health and mental health services, food assistance, obesity prevention, and intervention in cases of homelessness and maltreatment. This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID‐19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
526 - 540 of 647

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.