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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1681 - 1695 of 1845
Implementing group parent training in telepsychology: lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jason M. Fogler; Sébastien Normand; Nicole O’Dea (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
This article examines telepsychology delivery to meet families’ needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. The review describes how to use treatment fidelity as a guiding principle to orient adaptations for telepsychology, as well as preliminary findings and early lessons learned in the implementation.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 45 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 983–989 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, family assistance, mental health services, parents, psychological counselling
Minding our minds during COVID-19: helping school going children manage their mental health
Institution: UNESCO - New Delhi Office
Published: October 2020
In India, due to the closure of all schools, colleges and other learning institutions, more than 320 million students have been affected1. Out of these students, 247 million are enrolled in elementary and secondary education, while 28 million had been attending pre-school education. In addition to these numbers, more than  6 million girls and boys were already out of school before the advent of COVID-19. This guide is designed for principals, head teachers, teachers and parents to help school-going children maintain their mental health and wellness during these difficult times.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 70 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Mental Health | Tags: adolescents, education, mental stress | Countries: India | Publisher: UNESCO - New Delhi Office
The potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child growth and development: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Liubiana Arantes de Araújo; Cássio Frederico Veloso; Matheus de Campos Souza (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Jornal de Pediatria
This systematic review examines the impact of social restriction on mental and developmental health in parents and children/adolescents. Findings indicate that the tools used to mitigate the threat of a pandemic such as COVID-19 may very well threaten child growth and development. These tools — such as social restrictions, shutdowns, and school closures — contribute to stress in parents and children and can become risk factors that threaten child growth and development. Adverse childhood experiences increase the risk of developmental delays and health problems in adulthood, such as cognitive impairment, substance abuse, depression, and non-communicable diseases.
Information about the impact of epidemics on parents and children is relevant to policy makers to aid them in developing strategies to help families cope with epidemic/pandemic-driven adversity and ensure their children’s healthy development.
Impact of COVID-19 outbreak on mental health and perceived strain among caregivers tending children with special needs

AUTHOR(S)
Sapna Dhiman; Pradeep Kumar Sahu; William R. Reed (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

While COVID-19 outbreak has had adverse psychological effects in children with special needs, the mental state and burden on their caregivers during this pandemic has yet to be reported. The COVID-19 outbreak has had a significant impact on caregiver strain compared to perceived strain before the pandemic. Prevalence of depressive symptoms is high among caregivers of children with special needs. Negative perception of homecare therapy is associated with higher perceived strain and poor mental health. Not using tele-rehabilitation and perception of it being a poor medium for rehabilitation pose greater mental health risks.

When adolescents are in school during COVID-19: coordination between school-based health centers and education is key

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Anderson; Simon Haeder; Kelli Caseman (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Schools and School-based Health Centers (SBHC) play complementary roles in adolescent’s lives. The intersection between health care, notably SBHCs, and education has never seemed as pronounced as during the COVID-19 pandemic. Amidst the rapidly changing landscapes for both education and healthcare lie ample opportunities for better alignment of strategies to ensure that, once children return to the classroom (whether in person or virtual), all have access to a comprehensive, culturally appropriate, affordable healthcare delivery systems. This study provides recommendations related to SBHCs that could benefit adolescent health during the return to school. 
Mental health and its correlates among children and adolescents during COVID-19 school closure: the importance of parent-child discussion

AUTHOR(S)
Suqin Tang; Mi Xiang; Teris Cheung (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
 School closures due to the COVID-19 outbreak have affected 87% of the world’s students physically, socially, and psychologically, yet rigorous investigation into their mental health during this period is still lacking. This is a  cross-sectional  online  survey  of  4,342  primary  and  secondary  school  students  from Shanghai,  China ,  conducted  during  March  13–23,  2020. Besides  demographic  information, psychological distress (including depression, anxiety, and stress), life satisfaction, perceived impact of home quarantine, and parent-child discussions on COVID-19 were assessed.
The effect of the Coronavirus (Covid -19) pandemic on health-related quality of life in children

AUTHOR(S)
Derya Adıbelli; Adem Sümen

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The study was conducted to examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on health-related quality of life in children. The study was conducted with 597 children aged 7–13 and their parents using the online data collection tool via social media.
Implications of COVID19-induced nation-wide lockdown on children's behavior in Punjab, India

AUTHOR(S)
Bhupinder Kaur Sama; Palakpreet Kaur; Parteek Singh Thind (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child: care, health and development
Lockdown is one of the prevalent tools that are used to control the spread of COVID-19 virus in India. Under the circumstances created during lockdown period, children are deprived from the social interaction and companionship; because of which, they are susceptible to psychiatric disorders. Therefore, in this questionnaire-based study, efforts were to understand the impacts of lockdown on the mental status of the children of India and their specific causes.
Parenting activities and the transition to home-based education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Shawna J. Lee; Kaitlin P. Ward; Olivia D. Chang (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
This study reports on parent-child dynamics following COVID-19 related school closures, based on cross-sectional analyses of a survey that utilized a convenience sampling approach. Data were collected approximately five weeks after the World Health Organization declared that the Coronavirus was a pandemic. Participants (N = 405) were adults recruited throughout the U.S. This study examines data from parents (69% mothers and 31% fathers) with at least one child 0-12 years of age.
COVID-19 in children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Matthew D. Snape; Russell M. Viner

Published: October 2020   Journal: Science
Children have a low risk of COVID-19 and are disproportionately harmed by precautions. Maintaining young people’s education and wellbeing must remain an important priority for society in the COVID-19 era.
War on two fronts: experience of children with cancer and their family during COVID-19 pandemic in Iran

AUTHOR(S)
Jila Mirlashari; Fatemeh Ebrahimpour; Waliu Jawula Salisu

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
The COVID-19 pandemic affects all age groups and presents differently in children from adults. Children who contract the virus while suffering from cancer may face unique health challenges than their counterparts. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of children with cancer and their family in this era of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this qualitative study, a total of 21 participants were interviewed. They include five children, thirteen mothers, a father and three pediatric oncology nurses. The study setting was a Pediatric Hospital in Tehran, Iran.Three main themes were identified through thematic analysis. 1) Swinging on the path of fear to adaptation, 2) Left-alone at emotional distances, 3) Care system confusion, and decreased quality of care.
Association between physical activity and mood states of children and adolescents in social isolation during the COVID-19 epidemic

AUTHOR(S)
Xinxin Zhang; Wenfei Zhu; Sifan Kang (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
This study can help policymakers and healthcare professionals understand physical activity and mood states of Chinese children and adolescents during the epidemic. We should pay attention to the changes in physical activity levels and mood states of children and adolescents.
The impacts of home confinement due to Coronavirus (COVID-19) on children: a cross sectional survey study, Mediclinic City Hospital, Dubai, UAE

AUTHOR(S)
Sam Hassan; Mary Saviour; Sanjay Perkar (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: American Journal of Pediatrics
This is a cross sectional parental survey, to assess the impacts of home confinement on children in the cosmopolitan city of Dubai, UAE. Children included were from 3 years until 16 years old who were in schools or pre-school placements before COVID-19 started. Total number of children included in the survey was 658 of which 327 were boys and 331 girls. We found that the impact of the home confinement on children was significant and directly affected their quality of life that may extend beyond the lockdown for longtime. This study will help relevant authorities and organizations to understand the negative impacts brought by the COVID-19 confinement on children and to adopt appropriate strategies to help children and their parents tackle these impacts and get them back to normal life and school again. This study also paved the way for future studies in the identification and management of children’s behavior, attention, education, and other factors that play active roles in quality of life and normal development. Moreover, this study may help in embracing early preventative and management plans by schools and authorities in future similar pandemics, infections, disasters or school outbreaks. We also discuss strategies for school reopening and flexibility when an outbreak happens again in a school or community.
Cite this research | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 408-420 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, COVID-19 response, lockdown, parent-child relationship, parents, school attendance | Countries: United Arab Emirates
Parenting-related exhaustion during the Italian COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Marchetti; Lilybeth Fontanesi; Cristina Mazza (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Worldwide, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has generated significant worry, uncertainty, anxiety, sadness, and loneliness. In Italy, these effects have been particularly pronounced. While research on the COVID-19 outbreak has mainly focused on the clinical features of infected patients and the psychological impact on the general population and health professionals, no investigation has yet assessed the psychological impact of the pandemic on parents. The present research is a web-based survey of Italian parents to examine the prevalence of parenting-related exhaustion—and to identify its associated risk and protective factors—4 weeks into the lockdown.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 45 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 1114-1123 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, lockdown, mental health, parent-child relationship, parents, psychological distress | Countries: Italy
High levels of stress due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic among parents of children with and without chronic conditions across the USA

AUTHOR(S)
Miranda A. L. van Tilburg; Emily Edlynn; Marina Maddaloni (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children
The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unprecedented levels of stress for parents, especially those of children with chronic conditions. Mental health effects are expected to continue for months/years and preparation is needed to meet an increasing demand for mental health care.
1681 - 1695 of 1845

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

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The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.