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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2791 - 2805 of 3319
Acro-ischemic injuries in children-adolescents during CoViD-19 pandemic: from lifestyle changes due to lockdown to interferone

AUTHOR(S)
Federico Marchetti; Claudia Guiducci; Barbara Bigucci

Published: September 2020   Journal: Recenti Progressi in Medicina
This paper reports the descriptive experience of 14 cases of acro-ischemia in children and adolescents observed in the territorial area of Ravenna and Rimini. The cases were subjected to the nasopharyngeal swab and to the search for antibodies with ELISA method for CoViD-19 both with negative results.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 111 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 480-486 | Language: Italian | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, immunization | Countries: Italy
The effects of online homeschooling on children, parents, and teachers of grades 1-9 during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ying Zhao; Yong Guo; Yu Xiao (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Medical Science Monitor
Beginning in the 2020 spring semester, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all school-age children in China were homeschooled via live/recorded broadcasts, online group communication, and software-based homework submission. This study assessed the effects of and proper preparation for this educational approach.
Screening for economic hardship for child welfare-involved families during the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid partnership response

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Fallon; Rachael Lefebvre; Delphine Collin-Vézina (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Given the range of negative consequences related to the pandemic and the evolving supports available to families, child protection workers needed a clinical tool to guide and support work with families informed by an understanding of economic hardship. The objective of this paper is to report on the development and implementation strategy of a tool to be used for practice intervention during the pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: child care, child care services, family assistance, poverty | Countries: Canada
COVID-19 related anxiety in children and adolescents with severe obesity: a mixed-methods study

AUTHOR(S)
Ozair Abawi; Mila S. Welling; Emma van den Eynde (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Clinical Obesity
Recent studies report negative mental health effects of the COVID-19 related lockdown measures in general paediatric cohorts. Since obesity is a risk factor for  COVID-19 in adults, children (including adolescents) with obesity might perceive themselves to be vulnerable. Using a combined quantitative and qualitative approach,  this study explored COVID-19 related anxiety in paediatric patients with severe obesity in the Netherlands using semi-structured telephone interviews and the  Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) questionnaire, which had also been completed by the study population at baseline in the year prior to the COVID-19 outbreak.
The COVID-19 impact on childcare in agricultural populations

AUTHOR(S)
Marsha Salzwedel; Amy Liebman; Kate Kruse (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Agromedicine
The corona virus pandemic pulled back the curtain on rural America’s already fragile childcare system and shed light on the critical role that quality, affordable, accessible childcare plays in the lives of workers and families, as well as in the success of agricultural businesses. This commentary aims to describe how existing childcare problems were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, potentially impacting both the health and economics of farm households and farmworker families. For solutions to be successful, efforts will need to be collaborative, with federal interventions spurred on by childcare stakeholders. Successful collaborations will result in a better childcare system that nurtures children while their parents contribute to our nation’s production of agricultural products.
Rapid return of children in residential care to family as a result of COVID-19: scope, challenges, and recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Philip Goldman

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, some governments have mandated that residential care providers rapidly return children and youth to family. The goal of the present study was to better understand the scope and characteristics of rapid return, and to provide data-informed recommendations for service providers working with this population.

Coronavirus infections in children: from SARS and MERS to COVID-19, a narrative review of epidemiological and clinical features

AUTHOR(S)
Rosanna Iannarella; Claudia Lattanzi; Giulia Cannata (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Acta Biomedica
This narrative review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of epidemiological, pathogenic and clinical features, along with diagnosis and treatment, of the  ongoing epidemic of new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the pediatric population in comparison to the first two previous deadly coronavirus outbreaks,  SARS and MERS.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 91 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 14 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic
Young children's online learning during COVID-19 pandemic: Chinese parents' beliefs and attitudes

AUTHOR(S)
Chuanmei Dong; Simin Cao; Hui Li

Published: September 2020
This study surveyed 3275 Chinese parents’ beliefs and attitudes around young children’s online learning during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most parents (92.7%) in the study reported that their children had online learning experiences during the pandemic, and many (84.6%) spent less than a half-hour each time. The parents generally had negative beliefs about the values and benefits of online learning and preferred traditional learning in early childhood settings.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 118 | No. of pages: 9 | Topics: Education | Tags: e-learning, lockdown, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: China
A plea for the sustained implementation of digital interventions for young people with mental health problems in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Michael Kaess; Markus Moessner; Julian Koenig (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and the consequent global lockdown posed a particular challenge for youths with mental health problems. Crucial interference with their everyday lives likely increased psychological distress while accessibility of conventional mental health care was limited. Ongoing online trials offer a unique opportunity to analyse mental health status and help-seeking behaviour of adolescents during the pandemic.
Women's and men's work, housework and childcare, before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Del Boca; Noemi Oggero; Paola Profeta (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
Using new survey data collected in April 2020 from a representative sample of Italian women, we analyse the effects of working arrangements due to COVID-19 on housework, childcare and home schooling among couples where both partners work. Our results show that most of the additional housework and childcare associated to COVID-19 falls on women while childcare activities are more equally shared within the couple than housework activities.
Should we mandate a COVID-19 vaccine for children?

AUTHOR(S)
Douglas J. Opel; Douglas S. Diekema; Lainie Friedman Ross (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics

The zeal to develop and implement a vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection has been exceptional. Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration's proposal, seeks to produce hundreds of millions of doses of a vaccine by January 2021. Recent polls show as many as 70% of adults in the United States plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. And thousands of adults have registered to participate as volunteers in human challenge trills to speed up the development of a new vaccine. We anticipate that this fervor will eventually lead to discussions about making a COVID-19 vaccine mandatory. An obvious group to target for mandatory vaccination is children. Not only do we already mandate several vaccines for them to attend school, but strategies to reopen schools or keep them open may be predicated on it.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, health care, vaccination policies | Countries: United States
Vulnerability and resilience to pandemic-related stress among U.S. women pregnant at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Heidi Preis; Brittain Mahaffey; Cassandra Heiselman (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
Women pregnant during the  COVID-19 pandemic are  experiencing moderate to  high levels of emotional distress, which has  previously been shown to  be  attributable to  two  types of  pandemic-related pregnancy stress: stress associated with feeling unprepared for  birth due  to  the  pandemic (Preparedness Stress) and stress related to fears of perinatal COVID-19 infection (Perinatal Infection Stress). Objective. Given the well-documented harms associated with elevated prenatal stress and  the  critical importance of  developing appropriately targeted interventions, we investigated factors predictive of pandemic-related pregnancy stress.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 266 | No. of pages: 4 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: pregnant women, psychological distress, resiliency, women's health | Countries: United States
Is the COVID-19 regulation that prohibits parental visits to their children who are patients in hospital invalid in terms of the Constitution? What should hospitals do?

AUTHOR(S)
D. J. McQuoid-Mason

Published: September 2020   Journal: South African Medical Journal
This article deals with whether the COVID-19 regulation that prohibits parental visits to their children who are patients in hospital is
invalid in terms of the Constitution of South Africa. The article contends that the ban on visits by parents to their children in hospital is
a violation of the children’s rights provisions of the Constitution regarding the ‘best interests of the child’, and the ‘best interests standard’
in the Children’s Act 38 of 2005. The article also points out that the regulations are not saved by the limitations clause of the Constitution,
because the restriction is not ‘reasonable and justifiable’ and a ‘less restrictive means’ can be used to achieve the same purpose of preventing
the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The article concludes that the relevant regulation is legally invalid, and hospitals would be fully justified
in allowing parental visits to child patients provided proper precautions are taken to contain the virus.
Covid-19 and behavioural changes in students' learning patterns and efficiency

AUTHOR(S)
Jiang Yucheng; Jiao Bohan; Wang Nanzhi (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Educational Research
This research is aimed to investigate this change in Chinese high school students’ studying behavior and their learning efficiency. Previous researches have revealed that the COVID-19 outbreak already brought mental and emotional stress to college students and young teenagers, which might cause their learning behaviors to change. However, as there were no researches that are based on a population of high school students, we aimed to fill this gap in previous research and examine the changes in high school students’ studying efficiencies.
Sleep and screen time among adolescents during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kelly Janssens

Published: September 2020
The purpose of this study was to understand how both sleeping habits and smartphone use changed among adolescents between January 2020 to July 2020.
2791 - 2805 of 3319

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.