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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2806 - 2820 of 3759
Children experienced new or worsening tic issues when they were separated from their parents during the Italian COVID‐19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Danilo Buonsenso; Cristina De Rose; Paolo Mariotti

Published: November 2020   Journal: Acya Paediatrica
A systematic review and meta‐analysis covering the period up to 28 July 2020 suggested that the general impact of COVID‐19 on the physical health of children had been relatively mild up to that point.In fact, studies have suggested that children and adolescents have lower susceptibility to the virus than adults and play a lesser role in transmission, in marked contrast to influenza.However, they have indirectly suffered from the restrictions established to limit the spread of pandemic. These include the mental and social health consequences of social distancing measures, such as closing schools and stopping recreational activities, which are important for the cultural, social and psychological growth of children and adolescents. Some studies have reported that the impact of lockdown measures has caused more harm to them than the actual virus.
COVID‐19 and children: the mental & physical reverberations of the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Saad Arslan Iqbal; Namra Tayyab

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development
By now, a majority of the countries around the globe whether big or small and developed or developing have all been engulfed in a ‘global pandemic’ infamously known as the COVID‐19. To curtail the rapidly increasing transmission of the disease, the international community resorted to partial or nationwide lockdowns and isolation policies prompting closures of schools and other educational institutes. According to the UNICEF and United Nations, around 188 nations imposed country‐wide school closures affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Consequently, the physical distancing measures and school closures have had many implications on the mental and physical health and well-being of the children and their families.
The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Helen Cowie; Carrie‐Anne Myers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children & Society
The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. This discussion paper examines the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. It is written from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. The article discusses how these issues can be dealt with and sets out potential solutions as the world emerges from this global crisis.
SARS-CoV-2 transmission in an urban community: the role of children and household contacts

AUTHOR(S)
Chaya Pitman-Hunt; Jacqueline Leja; Zahra M. Jiwani

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
This is a single center US retrospective study of infection patterns among household sick contacts of children with confirmed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome – Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in an urban setting. A household sick contact (HHSC) was identified in fewer than half (42%) of patients and no child-to-adult transmission was identified.
Adolescent mental health, COVID-19, and the value of school-community partnerships

AUTHOR(S)
Marci F. Hertz; Lisa Cohen Barrios

Published: November 2020
Newly released 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC)’2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data Summary and Trends Report show that US adolescents continue to suffer from poor mental health and suicidality at alarming rates. These data alone would be cause for concern, but the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to further erode adolescent mental health, particularly for those whose mental health was poor prior to the pandemic. Given the status of adolescent mental health prior to COVID-19 and the impact of COVID-19, health professionals and schools must partner together now to mitigate potentially deleterious health, mental health and education impacts for children and adolescents.
Characteristics and considerations in the medical treatment of COVID‐19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Kazunori Imai; Asako Matsushima; Shinji Saitoh

Published: November 2020   Journal: Acute Medicine & Surgery
It is rare for children to be in serious condition or die from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS‐CoV‐2]) except for those with underlying diseases such as chronic lung disease (including asthma), cardiovascular disease, and immunosuppressive disease. Recently, patients with hyperinflammatory shock have been identified among children who are confirmed to have or are suspected of having SARS‐CoV‐2 infection. The presenting signs and symptoms are characterized by prolonged fever, abdominal pain, and cardiac involvement without any signs of pneumonia on chest computed tomography. However, it is uncertain at this time whether SARS‐CoV‐2 infection affects this syndrome. 
COVID-19 social isolation in Brazil: effects on the physical activity routine of families with children

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina dos Santos Cardoso De Sá; André Pombo; Carlos Luz (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Revista paulista de pediatria
This study aims to identify how Brazilian families with children aged under 13 years face the period of social isolation resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, especially regarding the time spent on physical activity (PA), intellectual activity, games, outdoor activities and screen. An anonymous online survey was launched on March 24, 2020 in Brazil to assess how families with children aged up to 12 years are adjusting their daily routines to this situation. In the survey, each family reported the daily time each child spent in sedentary activity (sum of intellectual activities, play time on screen, playing without PA) and PA (sum of playing with PA and PA).
Knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards COVID-19 among primary school students in Hubei Province, China

AUTHOR(S)
Qi Xue; Xinyan Xie; Qi Liu (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children and youth services review
This study was aimed to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) towards coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among school-aged children in the Hubei province when children were being confined to their homes. The questionnaire included questions of KAP about COVID-19, depressive and anxiety symptoms scales. Multivariable generalized linear regressions models were applied to estimate the unstandardized regression coefficients (β) of KAP.
Increased psychological distress during COVID-19 and quarantine in Ireland: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Tom Burke; Anna Berry; Laura K. Taylor

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Clinical Medicine
The emergence of the coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) resulted in a global pandemic. The psychological impact of an epidemic is multifaceted and acute, with long-term consequences. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey-based design was employed, assessing the psychological impact of COVID-19 on members of the Irish public during the quarantine period of COVID-19 in Ireland. Participants were invited to complete the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) retrospectively (prior to quarantine) and during the quarantine period, as well as measures of illness perceptions, well-being, and a bespoke measure (the Effects of COVID Questionnaire, ECQ), which assessed perceptions of COVID-related stresses associated with personal concerns, caring for children, caring for aging parents, as well as gratitude.
Bangladesh: iMMAP/DFS COVID-19: situation analysis
Institution: iMMAP
Published: November 2020
COVID-19 infection rates across Bangladesh are relatively stable and well below the peak in July/August; testing has also increased. Most national COVID-19 containment measures have been rescinded, but public health measures such as masks are still in place, and schools remain closed. In Cox's Bazar, COVID-19 infection rates have dropped significantly, but stringent protocols to prevent the virus's spread remain for humanitarian actors working in the camps.
School reopening during COVID-19 pandemic: considering students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Joline E. Brandenburg; Lainie K. Holman; Susan D. Apkon (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Over 80% of the children in the world have had their education impacted by COVID-19. For children with disabilities who receive special education services, access to in-person education and other resources at school is particularly important. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for students to attend school in person, without specifics for how children with disabilities can safely return to school. To appropriately plan and accommodate children with disabilities we must prioritize safety, allow for adherence to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and preserve essential school staff. The less cumbersome default of confining students with disabilities to home is not acceptable. This article provides an outline describing why Individual Education Plans and 504 plans are important, how they are related to the COVID-19 pandemic, and recommendations for measures to help with safe return to school for children with disabilities.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 13 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 425-431 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, disabled children, educational policy, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: United States
Centring adolescent girls and young women in the HIV and COVID-19 responses

AUTHOR(S)
Ameena Goga; Linda Gail Bekker; Philippe Van de Perre

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Lancet
Adolescent girls (10–19 years) and young women (20–24 years) are a key part of the 1·8 billion people who live in fragile contexts. In 2019, adolescent girls and young women comprised an estimated 10% of the population in sub-Saharan Africa but accounted for 59% of new HIV infections. Adolescent girls and young women are disproportionally affected by HIV and COVID-19.
COVID-19 pandemic: increased risk for psychopathology in children and adolescents?

AUTHOR(S)
Esther Via; Xavier Estrada-Prat; Jordina Tor (et al.)

Published: November 2020
Abstract COVID-19 pandemic is prompting multiple stressors-including control strategies such as lockdown- which may impact child and adolescent mental health. 1,529 caregivers answered an online questionnaire about emotional and behavioral symptoms of youths (4-18 years old) using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC).
Strengthening the online education ecosystem in India

AUTHOR(S)
Rammohan Khanapurkar; Shalini Bhorkar; Ketan Dandare (et al.)

Published: November 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the formal schooling system in India, as it has across the globe, causing massive pressure on the online education sector. This paper analyses the state of digitalised education in India. It outlines current government guidelines on digital-mode schooling, and uses the case of Maharashtra’s five-year-old efforts at digitalising government schools to gauge preparedness for implementing the guidelines. It highlights systemic weaknesses in educators’ pedagogical capacities, critiques the assumption that the availability of digital tools is sufficient to cater to the requirements of online education, and calls for the creation of policies on online education that are context-specific.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 45 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: India | Publisher: Observer Research Foundation
Working from home vs learning from home: a critical investigation and analysis during the COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Afzal Sayed Munna; M. Sadeque Imam Shaikh

Published: November 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Education and Social Studies
The article aimed to make a critical investigation and analysis on working from home vs learning from home during the COVID-19. Small-scale research was conducted only targeting parents (having at least one school going child) to capture the view of how they deem the concept of working from home vs learning from home and whether there are any reservations among both concepts. The findings from the 36 respondents’ feedback suggest that parents often prefer working from home (wherever possible) but the same parent does not want their child to learn from home. The research shows that most parents believe remote working leads to higher productivity and leads to cost-effectiveness and remote learnings deteriorate creativity.
2806 - 2820 of 3759

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.