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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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3061 - 3075 of 3759
Save our future: averting an education catastrophe for the world’s children
Institution: Save the Children
Published: October 2020

At the time of writing, the world is facing an education catastrophe. The measures taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19 has impacted education for children all over the world. Due to school closures, hundreds of millions of children are not learning or getting services that are vital for their development and well-being. Many of the world’s children were not learning even before the pandemic, and without rapid action, this learning crisis is likely to spread. This paper sets out seven priority action areas to deliver changes crucial to advert an education catastrophe for the world's children.

Learning losses in Pakistan due to COVID-19 school closures: a technical note on simulation results

AUTHOR(S)
Koen Geven; Amer Hasan

Published: October 2020
Pakistan was among the first countries in the world to institute widespread school closures as a result of Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). This note presents results from a series of simulations that aim to capture the impacts that school closures in Pakistan may have on the learning levels, enrollment, and future earnings of children and students. In this note, the authors present an overview of how these numbers are calculated and how to interpret them. This note draws on a simulation exercise for all countries on which data is available, including Pakistan, conducted by researchers at the World Bank.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, educational policy, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: Pakistan | Publisher: World Bank
Well-being of parents and children during the COVID-19 pandemic: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Stephen W. Patrick; Laura E. Henkhaus; Joseph S. Zickafoose (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Pediatrics

This national survey examines how the pandemic and mitigation efforts affected the physical and emotional well-being of parents and children in the United States. Since March 2020, 27% of parents reported worsening mental health for themselves, and 14% reported worsening behavioral health for their children. The proportion of families with moderate or severe food insecurity increased from 6% before March 2020 to 8% after, employer-sponsored insurance coverage of children decreased from 63% to 60%, and 24% of parents reported a loss of regular child care. Worsening mental health for parents occurred alongside worsening behavioral health for children in nearly 1 in 10 families, among whom 48% reported loss of regular child care, 16% reported change in insurance status, and 11% reported worsening food security. The study concludes that coronavirus disease pandemic has had a substantial tandem impact on parents and children in the United States. As policy makers consider additional measures to mitigate the health and economic effects of the pandemic, they should consider the unique needs of families with children.

 

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Research on violence against children during the COVID-19 pandemic
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: October 2020 UNICEF Publication
Research and data are important to draw attention to the experiences of children during the COVID-19 pandemic, to advocate for a range of protection services to be available during the crisis and beyond, and to inform the design of violence against children (VAC) prevention and response programmes. That said, the need for evidence must be balanced against the substantial risks to children, families and even researchers participating in violence-related research and data collection efforts. These risks are always present, but are likely to be amplified in the context of COVID-19, which may require rapid research, often via remote methods such as mobile phones or the Internet. This new UNICEF publication, Research on Violence against Children during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Guidance to inform ethical data collection and evidence generation, addresses key questions on generating VAC evidence that may arise during the pandemic and includes a decision tree (below) to guide those considering conducting research and data collection on VAC during COVID-19.

 
Neonatal management and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: an observation cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Christine M. Salvatore; Jin-Young Han; Karen P. Acker (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The risk of vertical and perinatal transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19), the most appropriate management, and the neonate's risk of developing COVID-19 during the perinatal period are unknown. This observational cohort study, conducted on neonates born to mothers positive for SARS-CoV-2 at delivery, aims to identify best practices in infection control within mother–newborn dyads, as well as potential risk factors associated with transmission. 
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 721-727 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child and maternal health, COVID-19, infectious disease | Countries: United States
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What have we learnt? Findings from a survey of ministries of education on national responses to COVID-19
Institution: UNESCO, *UNICEF, The World Bank
Published: October 2020 UNICEF Publication
According to this new report published by UNESCO, UNICEF and the World Bank, schoolchildren in low- and lower-middle-income countries have already lost nearly four months of schooling since the start of the pandemic, compared to an average of six weeks among high-income countries. Compiling data from surveys on national education responses to COVID-19 from 149 countries between July and October, the report also finds that schoolchildren in low- and lower-middle income countries were less likely to have access to remote learning or to be monitored on a day-to-day basis by teachers and were more likely to have delays in their schools reopening.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 51 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: COVID-19 response, education, government policy | Publisher: UNESCO, *UNICEF, The World Bank
The role of palliative care in caring for the families of patients with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Bakar; Elizabeth Capano; Melissa Patterson (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
This study examines the role of palliative care for families of patients with Covid-19 in hospital settings. Multicomponenet interdisciplinary interventions have been implemented to enhance the ability to create a therapeutic alliance with family members and facilitate the provision of goal concordant care to patients with COVID-19. Findings show that families and patients benefit from targeted psycho-social support through the difficult process of making complex medical and end-of-life decisions during this unprecedented time.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 37 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 866-868 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Mental Health | Tags: COVID-19 response, family assistance | Countries: United States | Publisher: World Health Organisation
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A neglected tragedy: The global burden of stillbirths 2020

There is a high risk that the COVID-19 pandemic may reverse decades-long progress on reducing child mortality and affect the number of stillbirths. This new release of the first-ever joint stillbirth estimates by the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME) presents the number of babies that are stillborn every year due to pregnancy and birth-related complications, the absence of health workers and basic services. The issue has become an essential part of global child survival initiatives. UNICEF calls on international organizations, governments and partners for increased and strong political will, sound policies and targeted investment along the continuum of care for every mother and child.

Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 90 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Child Protection | Tags: child mortality
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UNICEF’s social protection response to COVID-19
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: October 2020 UNICEF Publication
COVID-19 is having a devastating impact on children and their families, with current estimates suggesting that an additional 117 million children will be living in poverty by the end of 2020. Beyond income, the pandemic is deepening poverty across every dimension of a child’s life, including health, education, nutrition, housing, water and sanitation. Social protection is playing a crucial role in the response, with countries expanding their social protection coverage and expanding national cash transfer programmes. This report highlights UNICEF’s role in supporting governments with both the immediate social protection response and longer-term recovery. Our work encompasses 115 countries where UNICEF has supported governments in strengthening national systems reaching over 44 million households. The report outlines UNICEF’s key areas of expertise in social protection and country examples covering the range of our work across all regions.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 12 | Language: English | Topics: Child Poverty | Tags: social protection | Publisher: *UNICEF
Food insecurity in households with young children: a test of contextual congruence

AUTHOR(S)
Justin T. Denney; Mackenzie Brewer; Rachel Tolbert Kimbro

Published: October 2020   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
Household food insecurity, an inability to provide adequate nutrition for a healthy, active lifestyle, affects nearly 1 in 7 households with children in the United States. Though rates of food insecurity declined to pre-recession levels just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, they are now once again increasing. As a result, in one of the wealthiest countries in the world, millions of young children continue to grow up in households that struggle daily with a problem that is often associated with the developing world. The result is both immediate and long- term health and development deficits for children.
Child and adolescent psychiatry telemedicine: a Singaporean experience born in Covid-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ngar Yee Poon; Shirley Pat Fong; Shirley Pat Fong

Published: October 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Singapore was one of the first Asian countries to be affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. The article shares the experience of a consultation liaison psychiatry service within the largest women and children’s hospital in Singapore. The adoption of telepsychiatry has enabled continuous provision of care whilst reducing unnecessary exposure to COVID-19. This clinical case demonstrates the clinical utility of the telemedicine service for youth mental healthcare during the pandemic. 
Examining the impact of COVID-19 in ethnically diverse families with young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
C. Neece; L. L. McIntyre; R. Fenning

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
The present study sought to examine the impact of COVID-19 in 77 ethnically, linguistically and socioeconomically diverse families with young children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) in California and Oregon, who were participating in larger intervention studies. Results suggest that parents of young children with IDD report significant challenges at home during the pandemic. Professional support, especially during the reopening phases, will be critical to support family well‐being and child developmental outcomes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 64 | Issue: 10 | No. of pages: 739-749 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, disadvantaged groups, ethnic minority children, impact, social inequality | Countries: United States
Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of children in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Sabina Yeasmin; Rajon Banik; Sorif Hossain (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
This study aims to explore the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of children during the lockdown in Bangladesh. The paper demonstrates that large proportions of children suffered from mental health disturbances in Bangladesh during the period of lockdown. Implementation of psychological intervention strategies and improvement in house-hold financial conditions, literacy of parents, taking care of children, and job security may help in improving the psychological/mental status of children and the authors believe that the findings will be beneficial to accelerate the rate of achieving the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) linked to health status in Bangladesh.
Domestic violence and substance abuse during COVID19: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Carmita Abdo; Eduardo P. Miranda; Caroline Silva Santos (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
As COVID-19 develops around the world, numerous publications have described the psychiatric consequences of this pandemic. Although clinicians and healthcare systems are mainly focused on managing critically ill patients in an attempt to limit the number of casualties, psychiatric disease burden is increasing significantly. In this scenario, increased domestic violence and substance abuse have been recently reported. The objective of this study is to perform a systematic review of the literature regarding the consequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 infection in terms of domestic violence and substance abuse, and compare incidences found.
New briefs address inequities in education during COVID-19 and how education policy and schools can support marginalized children and youth
Institution: Society for Research in Child Development
Published: September 2020
A new volume of Statement of the Evidence briefs examines the impact of systemic racism and the potential exacerbating effects of COVID-19 on racial-ethnic minority and LGBTQ+ children and youth. The five 2-page briefs, written by child development experts, including members of SRCD caucuses, draw upon developmental science and recent data to focus on the experiences each community faces. They also provide guidance on evidence-informed educational policies and practices to address the needs of each community. Educational policymakers and leaders can draw upon each community’s strengths and implement these recommendations to address the unique needs of these children.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.