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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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3316 - 3330 of 3759
Baby steps: the gender division of childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Almudena Sevilla; Sarah Smith

Published: August 2020   Journal: Oxford Review of Economic Policy
The nature and scale of the shocks to the demand for, and the supply of, home childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic provide a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of the division of home labour and the determinants of specialization within the household. We collected real-time data on daily lives to document the impact of measures to control COVID-19 on UK families with children under the age of 12. We document that these families have been doing the equivalent of a working week in childcare, with mothers bearing most of the burden. The additional hours of childcare done by women are less sensitive to their employment than they are for men, leaving many women juggling work and (a lot more) childcare, with likely adverse effects on their mental health and future careers. However, some households, those in which men have not been working, have taken greater steps towards an equal allocation, offering the prospect of sharing the burden of childcare more equally in the future.
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID‐19 on children's physical and mental well‐being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
Prolonged school closures are one of the most disruptive forces in the COVID‐19 era. School closures have upended life for children and families, and educators have been forced to determine how to provide distance learning. Schools are also an essential source of nonacademic supports in the way of health and mental health services, food assistance, obesity prevention, and intervention in cases of homelessness and maltreatment. This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID‐19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
Covid-19 and education in Morocco as a potential model of concern for North Africa: a short commentary

AUTHOR(S)
Mohamed Abioui; Mohamed Dades; Yuriy Kostyuchenko (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of Ethics Education
The key problems and challenges connected with the Covid-19 pandemic in the field of education in sub-Saharan Africa are described in this paper. The study is based on the information collected from teachers and parents during the lockdown. The main problems connected with the organization of distance learning, such as the availability and accessibility of electricity and stable communications, were described. The main questions connected with the support of e-learning such as unequal access to distance education platforms and tools and readiness of teachers of public and private schools were described. Key social and demographic challenges and threats to sustainable e-learning, such as critical overload of teachers, child mobilization for domestic tasks, age, ethnic and gender-based harassment and violence were analyzed.
Management of hepatitis C in children and adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Pokorska-Śpiewak; Mateusz Śpiewak

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Journal of Hepatology
In recent years, significant progress in the antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been made due to the development of interferon-free therapies. Three different highly effective, oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens have been approved for use in adolescents with CHC between the ages of 12-years-old and 17-years-old in Europe. According to the current recommendations, all treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced children with CHC virus infection should be considered for DAA therapy to prevent the possible progression of hepatitis C virus-related liver disease and its complications. However, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, which was classified as a pandemic in March 2020, is currently spreading throughout the world, resulting in a disruption of the healthcare system. This disruption is having a negative impact on the care of patients with chronic diseases, including children with CHC. Thus, several efforts have to be made by pediatric hepatologists to prioritize patient care in children with CHC. These efforts include promoting telemedicine in the outpatient setting, using local laboratory testing for follow-up visits, and engaging in the home delivery of DAAs for patients under antiviral therapy whenever possible.
Child abuse and neglect prevention by public health nurses during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Chikako Honda; Kyoko Yoshioka‐Maeda; Riho Iwasaki‐Motegi (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Child abuse and neglect are high‐priority public health issues around the world, but it is known that early care for families with parenting anxiety and stress is essential for preventing abuse (World Health Organization, 2006). In Japan, the country has created a national campaign plan called The Second Term of Healthy Parents and Children 21 (2015‐2024) to address two prioritized agenda: (1) supporting parents with difficulties raising their children; and (2) preventing child abuse from pregnancy. Public health nurses (PHNs) play a crucial role in preventing child abuse and neglect by providing family healthcare in each municipality. In Japan, more than 70% of PHNs work for municipalities or prefectures covering people at various health stages from birth to old age, identifying health issues for infants and their parents before preschool through a variety of health checkups and home visits.
Emerging health challenges for children with physical disabilities and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic: the ECHO French survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marine Cacioppo; Sandra Bouvier; Rodolphe Bailly (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

The daily lives of children with physical disabilities and their families have been significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The children face health risks, especially mental, behavioral, social and physical risks. This study aimed to identify potential healthcare issues relating to the wellbeing of disabled children, continuity of rehabilitation and medical care, and parental concerns during the COVID-19 lockdown.

News coverage of child care during COVID-19: where are women and gender?

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca Wallace; Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant

Published: August 2020   Journal: Politics & Gender
Research has long observed the absence of gender in child care policy, media, and elections. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has invoked critical questions about child care and its importance to states’ economic recoveries around the world. In this research note, news coverage of child care in major Canadian daily newspapers is analyzed to explore whether and how news narratives regarding child care are shifting in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children with COVID-19 in Mumbai, India

AUTHOR(S)
Shreepal Jain; Supratim Sen; Srinivas Lakshmivenkateshiah (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Indian pediatrics

This is an observational study about the presentation, treatment and outcome of children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome with COVID-19 (MIS-C) in Mumbai metropolitan area in India, and it is conducted at four tertiary hospitals in Mumbai. Parameters including demographics, symptomatology, laboratory markers, medications and outcome were obtained from patient hospital records and analyzed in patients treated for MIS-C (as per WHO criteria) from 1 May, 2020 to 15 July, 2020.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 57 | No. of pages: 1015-1019 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, hospitalization, respiratory diseases | Countries: India
Factors affecting the anxiety levels of adolescents in home‐quarantine during COVID‐19 pandemic in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Senay Kılınçel; Oğuzhan Kılınçel; Gürkan Muratdağı (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry

The long‐term closing of schools and home‐quarantine during the COVID‐19 pandemic cause negative effects on the physical and mental health of young people. Studies evaluating the mental health of adolescents during the pandemic are limited in the literature. This study is aimed to determine the results of home‐quarantine measures taken for adolescents during the pandemic and the affecting factors.

Ethics of COVID-19-related school closures

AUTHOR(S)
Michael Silverman; Robert Sibbald; Saverio Stranges

Published: August 2020   Journal: Canadian Journal of Public Health
COVID-19 mitigation strategies have led to widespread school closures around the world. Initially, these were undertaken based on data from influenza outbreaks in which children were highly susceptible and important in community-wide transmission. An argument was made that school closures were necessary to prevent harm to vulnerable adults, especially the elderly. Although data are still accumulating, the recently described complication, pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome, is extremely rare and children remain remarkably unaffected by COVID-19. We also do not have evidence that children are epidemiologically important in community-wide viral spread. Previous studies have shown long-term educational, social, and medical harms from school exclusion, with very young children and those from marginalized groups such as immigrants and racialized minorities most affected. The policy and ethical implications of ongoing mandatory school closures, in order to protect others, need urgent reassessment in light of the very limited data of public health benefit.
La juventud opina sobre violencia durante la pandemia de la COVID-19 (U-Report)
Published: August 2020

Results of a survey recently carried out by UNICEF show that thousands of young people in Latin America and the Caribbean believe that tensions at home have increased because of COVID-19. Opinions were collected through U-Report, UNICEF's secure, free and confidential mobile empowerment platform that gives young people a voice on the big issues that affect them.

Youth call to take action against COVID-19 in Latin America and the Caribbean (U-Report)

AUTHOR(S)
Juan Pablo Arguello Yepez; Alfonso Fernández Reca

Published: August 2020

U-Report poll of 10,500 young people in 31 countries suggests most youth believe action is needed to combat COVID-19, but many still need safe and clear information.

Youth speak up about violence during COVID-19 (U-Report)
Published: August 2020

Results of a survey recently carried out by UNICEF show that thousands of young people in Latin America and the Caribbean believe that tensions at home have increased because of COVID-19. Opinions were collected through U-Report, UNICEF's secure, free and confidential mobile empowerment platform that gives young people a voice on the big issues that affect them.

Periods in a pandemic
Institution: Plan International
Published: August 2020

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) are the first line of defence against COVID-19. It’s widely recognised that access to clean, running water and soap for handwashing is a critical need that must be met in  our global response to the pandemic, however there are other essential aspects of WASH that should not be forgotten at this time.  On any single day during this health emergency, 800 million diverse women and girls are menstruating and grappling with the unique challenges of doing so in a global pandemic. This report looks at how the current implications of COVID-19 is exacerbating key challenges for people who menstruate around the world and  provides recommendations on how to include menstrual hygiene management (MHM) within  a COVID-19 response. 

African girls in the Covid-19 pandemic
Institution: Plan International
Published: August 2020

As countries across Africa experience the impact of COVID-19 across health systems, economies and communities, progress made in the last decade in achieving the rights of adolescent girls’ risks being lost. African governments must act in urgency to address this “invisible crisis" and protect the important gains made to protect, and empower girls over the last decade.COVID-19, an unfolding global health crisis, is revealing a grim impact on millions of adolescent girls across Africa. Along with rising infection rates across countries in the continent, the disease is compounding challenges to girls’ agency, protection, learning and leadership. The African response to the pandemic will – if unchecked - roll back important gains made in ensuring African girls’ access and enjoyment of human rights. COVID-19 is emerging as not only a health crisis but a significant protection crisis for adolescent girls across the continent.

3316 - 3330 of 3759

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.