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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1081 - 1095 of 1252
Child poverty, food insecurity, and respiratory health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ian P Sinha; Alice R Lee; Davara Bennett (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Lancet Respir Med
The eradication of poverty and hunger are the top sustainable development goals, adopted by UN Member States in 2015. Yet the World Food Programme estimates that, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, acute food insecurity could double from 135 to 265 million people worldwide. In the absence of mitigating policies, poverty leading to food insecurity will damage the respiratory health of a generation of children.
Children wait for a teacher in a classroom at Treichville Regional School, in the city of Abidjan. Although the school reopened after being closed for many years due to armed conflict, most teachers remain absent. (2011)
Framework for reopening schools
Global school closures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic present an unprecedented risk to children’s education, protection and well-being. Schools do much more than teach children how to read, write and count. They also provide nutrition, health and hygiene services; mental health and psychosocial support; and dramatically reduce the risk of violence, early pregnancy and more. And it’s the most vulnerable children who are the hardest hit by school closures, and we know from previous crises that the longer they are out of school, the less likely they are to return.When deciding whether to reopen schools, authorities should look at the benefits and risks across education, public health and socio-economic factors, in the local context, using the best available evidence. This policy brief aims to inform the decision-making process regarding school reopening, support national preparations and guide the implementation process, as part of overall public health and education planning processes. The guidelines outline six key priorities to assess the readiness of those schools and inform planning.
Impact of COVID-19 on children: special focus on the psychosocial aspect

AUTHOR(S)
Ritwik GHOSH Ghosh; Mahua J. Dubey; Subhankar Chatterje (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Minerva Pediatrica
Although medical literature shows that children are minimally susceptible to 2019-Corona virus disease (COVID-19), they are hit the hardest by psychosocial impact of this pandemic. Being quarantined in homes and institutions may impose greater psychological burden than the physical sufferings caused by the virus. School closure, lack of outdoor activity, aberrant dietary and sleeping habits are likely to disrupt children’s usual lifestyle and can potentially promote monoto- ny, distress, impatience, annoyance and varied neuropsychiatric manifestations. Incidences of domestic violence, child abuse, adulterated online contents are on the rise. Children of single parent and frontline workers suffer unique problems. The children from marginalized communities are particularly susceptible to the infection and may suffer from extended ill-consequences of this pandemic, such as child labor, child trafficking, child marriage, sexual exploitation and death etc. Parents, pediatricians, psychologists, social workers, hospital authorities, government and non-governmental organizations have important roles to play to mitigate the psychosocial ill-effects of COVID-19 on children and adolescents. To provide the basic amenities, social security, medical care, and to minimize the educational inequities among the children of the different strata of the society are foremost priorities.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 72 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 12 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health, Health | Tags: child psychology, psychology, pandemic, COVID-19 response, COVID-19, impact
Maintaining safety and service provision in human milk banking: a call to action in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Shenker

Published: June 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
When a mother's own milk is not available, WHO recommends pasteurised donor human milk as the first alternative.  Human milk banks screen and recruit donors, and have wide-ranging precautions to ensure the safety of donor milk. Screened donor milk principally feeds babies of very low birthweight, protecting them from a range of complications, as well as babies with congenital anomalies or neurological conditions. The benefits of a human milk diet highlight the importance of providing these infants with donor milk for short periods—with appropriate use in the context of optimal support for lactation, such provision can support mothers to establish their milk supply without the need for supplementation with infant formula milk. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is presenting many challenges to human milk banks worldwide and highlights a range of vulnerabilities in service provision and emergency preparedness. 
Promoting and supporting children’s health and healthcare during COVID-19 – International Paediatric Association Position Statement

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan D. Klein; Berthold Koletzko; Mortada H El-Shabrawi (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: BMJ
This paper provides recommendations from the International Pediatric Association for children’s health and healthcare during COVID-19. The IPA highlights the health needs of children and outlines priorities for preserving newborn, child and adolescent health during the COVID-19 crisis and beyond, where social distancing and lockdowns threaten access to routine care and preventive services.
O uso intensivo da internet por crianças e adolescentes no contexto da COVID-19 e os riscos para violências autoinflingidas

AUTHOR(S)
Suely Ferreira Deslandes; Tiago Coutinho

Published: June 2020   Journal: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
This article aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. We briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a “global fear” that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. We centered our debate on “recreational” practices, called “challenges” with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.
Risks to Bangladeshi children and young people during covid-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Sazedur Rahman; Zohra S. Lassi; Sheikh Mohammad Shariful Islam

Published: June 2020   Journal: BMJ

Children and young people are at higher risk of adverse health outcomes including obesity, neglect, and abuse by parents, and thus are more prone to mental health and chronic health issues during the covid-19 pandemic. The current lockdown situation has led children and young people into a sedentary lifestyle, which might increase the incidence of obesity 

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 369 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, lockdown | Countries: Bangladesh
Comment les enfants et adolescents avec le trouble déficit d’attention/hyperactivité (TDAH) vivent-ils le confinement durant la pandémie COVID-19 ?

AUTHOR(S)
E. Bobo; L. Lin; E. Acquaviva (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: L'Encéphale
During the COVID-19 pandemic, the French government has decided a general lockdown. This unprecedented situation has raised concerns about children's and adolescent's mental health. Children and adolescents diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find this context of restrained activity particularly tricky. The objectives of our study are to gather information about the well-being and global life conditions of children and adolescents with ADHD during the COVID-19 outbreak in France.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 46 | Issue: 3, Supplement | No. of pages: 585-592 | Language: French | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, COVID-19, lockdown
Should Coronavirus Disease 2019–Associated Inflammatory Syndromes in Children Affect Social Reintegration?

AUTHOR(S)
Michael Portman; Rolando Cimaz

Published: June 2020   Journal: JAMA Pediatrics
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) appears to induce this new condition, which has been called pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome (PIMS) or pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) and described in detail by investigators in Europe and New York, New York. Pediatric inflammatory syndromes presumably triggered by SARS-CoV-2 exposure deserve heightened awareness because they have critical and potentially life-altering outcomes on affected children. However, unless a substantial increase in case numbers occurs over the coming months, these syndromes remain rare and should not be used to substantially change decisions affecting millions of schoolchildren, given the negative outcomes of delaying school reopenings. These include adverse outcomes on child mental health and learning. Additionally, school delays will produce further societal inequities.
Paediatrics is a big player of COVID-19 in Hong Kong

AUTHOR(S)
K.L. Hon; Karen K.Y. Leung

Published: June 2020   Journal: Hong Kong Medical Journal
As of 23 April 2020, there have been 104 confirmed paediatric cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hong Kong. Fortunately, all cases were mild or asymptomatic with no fatalities. The proportion of patients with COVID-19 who are aged <19 years is 14.1% in Hong Kong, which is higher than other countries . This may be attributable to high numbers of overseas students returning to Hong Kong; even those who are asymptomatic are tested as part of the current border controls. Mortality for patients aged <19 years is very low, with less than 10 reported cases, mostly teenagers.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 265-266 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 | Countries: Hong Kong
Why children avoid the worst coronavirus complications might lie in their arteries

AUTHOR(S)
David Cyranoski

Published: June 2020   Journal: Nature
Evidence is mounting that healthy blood vessels protect children from serious effects of COVID-19, such as stroke.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 582 | No. of pages: 324-325 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19
Coronavirus (COVID‐19) pandemic: personal view to a new model of paediatric practice

AUTHOR(S)
Zakaria Barsoum

Published: June 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health
Virtual consultations minimise the risk of COVID‐19 transmission, promote public protection and reduce the backlog of waiting lists during this time of testing. Although clinical confidence and appropriateness of use may vary in various aspects of clinical care, the author's experience in paediatric allergy is satisfactory.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care, COVID-19
Child abuse: a hidden crisis during COVID-19 quarantine

AUTHOR(S)
Maximilian Andreas Storz

Published: June 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health

According to the WHO, children and their mothers living in abusive relationships are now more likely to be exposed to violence. Family members spend more time in close contact, and families have to cope with additional stress and potential economic or job losses. We must not forget about these children.

Domestic violence during COVID-19: the GP role.

AUTHOR(S)
Jeremy Gibson

Published: June 2020   Journal: British Journal of General Practice

Threatened by COVID-19, the world has been on lockdown. But within the walls of their own homes many women face an enemy more terrifying than COVID-19. The domestic abuse charity Refuge reported a 700% increase in calls in a single day.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 70 | Issue: 696 | No. of pages: 340 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: domestic violence, COVID-19
Will COVID-19 pandemic-associated lockdown increase myopia in Indian children?

AUTHOR(S)
Muthu Sumitha; Srinivasan Sunjay; Vasudha Kemmanu (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Ophtalmology
Like most other Asian countries, India has also seen a gradual increase in the incidence and prevalence of myopia. Increased screen‑time, prolonged near work, reduced outdoor activities are some of the important risk factors for myopia according to various studies. Countries like China, where schools have replaced books with tablets and computers, evidently have a higher incidence of myopia.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 68 | Issue: 7 | No. of pages: 1496 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19 | Countries: India
1081 - 1095 of 1252

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.