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Building Inclusive Education Systems for Refugees

Building Inclusive Education Systems for Refugees
(Past event)

Event type: Webinar

Related research: Children and migration: rights, resilience, and protection

events6 December 2023time14:00 - 15:00 UCT

Innocenti, in collaboration with the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE), UNESCO and UNHCR, delivered a webinar this week exploring cutting-edge research on effective strategies for the inclusion of refugees in national education systems. Drawing on Innocenti’s launch of it’s new report ‘Including Refugee Learners in National Education Systems’, and featuring insights from complementary research studies conducted by UNHCR and UNESCO, the panel presented promising practices to highlight the opportunities and challenges of effective inclusion. Beginning with a global overview of educational inclusion from a policy and data perspective, presenters then dove into regional-level insights on refugee inclusion in the West and Central African region and the Latin American and Caribbean regions. The event was well attended with more than 120 participants. Josiah Kaplan represented UNICEF Innocenti along with the lead co-authors of the report, Rachel Marcus, on behalf of the Overseas Development Institute.

 

Find out more about the event here.


Experts

Josiah Kaplan
Child Protection Specialist

UNICEF Innocenti

Related Content

Building Inclusive Education Systems  for Refugees
Publication

Building Inclusive Education Systems for Refugees

In line with the Agenda for Sustainable Development, and especially Sustainable Development Goal 4, access to quality education is essential for all children and youth, and offers refugee children and youth in particular a stable and safe environment within which to learn, grow and thrive. Globally, however, refugee children and youth struggle to reach the classroom – 48% of refugee children were estimated to be out of school in 2020- 21, with lower enrolment rates at secondary and tertiary levels (UNHCR 2022a; UNICEF 2022a).1 Low rates of educational engagement for refugee learners are heavily influenced by a lack of durable solutions and the lack of continuity across different educational pathways, with often limited access past primary school. This is all the more concerning as the number of refugee children worldwide has increased dramatically (UNHCR, 2023) by an estimated 116% in the period between 2010 and 2020 (UNICEF, 2022b). This brief advances knowledge on the current state of inclusion of refugee learners. It is based on several separate but complementary studies carried out by UNICEF Innocenti, UNHCR, and UNESCO, and was developed to share common inter-agency findings, gaps, and learnings. Taken together, these studies collectively seek to understand what has worked to promote inclusion in national education systems from multiple perspectives (e.g., policy and data), and to identify remaining barriers and challenges to effective inclusion for each.
Including Refugee Learners in National Education Systems
Publication

Including Refugee Learners in National Education Systems

Including Refugee Learners in National Education Systems identifies key factors that underpin effective inclusion of refugee learners in national education systems and outlines barriers to achieving this goal. Based on an in-depth review of global evidence and literature and interviews with key stakeholders in refugee education, the report highlights key findings, including the importance of: • Government leadership and coordination efforts • Effective international cooperation • Awareness of policies and guidance with education systems • Capacity to support refugee inclusion. The report presents in-depth country case studies from Ecuador and Rwanda, providing information on diverse regional and country frameworks relating to educational inclusion. The Rwanda case study suggests that refugee inclusion in education can be achieved with a broad orientation towards inclusion and non-discrimination, even in the absence of specific policies and strategies focused on refugees. The Ecuador case study emphasizes that positive policies do not always filter down to those with responsibility to implement them and highlights the importance of efforts to ensure that teachers, school administrators and district-level staff are aware of new policies and have the capacity to enact them.
Children and migration: rights, resilience, and protection
Project

Children and migration: rights, resilience, and protection

Children cross borders – within and between countries – in varying circumstances and for different reasons, both voluntary and involuntary.