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COVID-19, the Infodemic, & Fake News

What the Experts Say: Coronavirus & Children
(Past event)

Event type: Webinar

Related research: Global Kids Online

events12 November 2020
time15:00 - 16:00 CET

 

This golden age of innovation, with a flourishing of new technologies and online platforms, has created extraordinary opportunities for children and young people to enrich their knowledge and information, their social networks, and their solidarity and civic activism like never before. But those same technologies are used, abused and misused to promote fake messages and harm - leading to hate speech, racism, and hostility with often dangerous consequences to democracies, mental health and children and young people.

The infodemic that has spread at the same rate as the COVID pandemic has brought this into sharp relief. Why now, why has this exploded in 2020 with data being exploited at an unprecedented level?

How can children and young people develop the ability to decipher disinformation and misinformation?

 

 


Experts

Maria Ressa
Chief Executive Officer, Rappler
Guy Berger
Director of Freedom of Expression, UNESCO
Angus Thomson
Senior Social Scientist: Demand for Immunization, UNICEF
Claire Wardle
Strategic Direction and Research, First Draft
Sarah Crowe
Moderator
David Anthony
Moderator

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