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EventEvent

Ethics in Humanitarian Research: A Practical Discussion

(Past event)

Event type: Webinar

Related research: Ethical research and children

events20 - 12 May 2020
Please save the date for the next Humanitarian Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning (HuMEL) meeting on Wednesday, May 20!

About this Event

Humanitarian Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning (HuMEL) is an emergency M&E learning network centered around the increasingly complex humanitarian context. The purpose of the network is to share lessons learned, methodologies, and experiences between implementers, donors, and other stakeholders with the goal of improving programming.

Join us for a lively discussion on ethical reviews for humanitarian research and monitoring. The webinar will kick off with a panel presentation from several implementing organizations that have in-house ethical oversight processes and procedures including ERC/ERBs and other less centralized mechanisms for ensuring ethical research and MEAL. We will then break into small groups to discuss challenges and successful approaches for conducting ethics reviews for humanitarian research and monitoring. Topics for small-group discussion will include research ethics during COVID-19, balancing local and international IRB approval timelines and the humanitarian imperative for rapid implementation, the pros and cons of in-house ethics reviews, and a selection of other topics proposed by participants during registration.


Experts

Gabrielle Berman

UNICEF Innocenti

Contact

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