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EventEvent

Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA) training

MODA training held for researchers in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
(Past event)

Event type: Workshop

Related research: Multidimensional child poverty

events08 - 10 July 2019
point map UNICEF Innocenti
via degli Alfani, 58
Florence, Italy 50121

11 July 2019 - How can we measure child poverty in the unique contexts of Eastern Europe and Central Asia? UNICEF Innocenti held a training course to introduce multidimensional child poverty measurement to national stakeholders and UNICEF country office specialists from the Europe and Central Asia region. Participants were introduced to measurement of child poverty and completed exercises using national statistics to develop nationally contextually appropriate indicators for measuring child poverty in their countries.

The three-day training course provided national statistical office representatives important conceptual and technical guidance needed to understand differences between monetary and non-monetary child poverty measurement and between the main approaches to multidimensional measurement, including UNICEF’s Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA) and Oxford University’s Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI). Training included lectures and group work explaining how MODA and the MPI work as well as the European Union Child Deprivation Index and exercises to help individuals use their own local survey data. Fourteen participants from five different countries including Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bulgaria, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan met from July 8-10, 2019 at UNICEF Innocenti in Florence, Italy.

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